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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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June 07, 2017

The Definitive Guide to Keto

By Mark Sisson
157 Comments

ketogenic diet, 3D rendering, text on metalI use my Los Angeles surroundings as a barometer for changes in the mainstream approach to health, and it holds up quite well. Silicon Valley can claim to be the cradle of technology, but L.A. is definitely the cradle of diet and fitness trends; and the latest is most definitely keto. At the local cafe where every species of Malibu fitness enthusiast gathers to gossip and fuel up, I’m seeing fewer gels and energy bars, and way more butter coffees and discarded packets of the new powdered ketone supplement products.

Sure enough, keto is entering into mainstream health consciousness everywhere. Google searches for “ketogenic diet” are at an all-time high. The stream of keto-related email queries and comments I receive has seen a major uptick. And early this year, a major publisher approached me with a keto book proposal, which I accepted. I dove headlong into a total Small_Keto Reset Diet by Mark Sissonimmersion/participatory journalism experience where I walked my talk, and pricked my finger for blood tests enough times to get a little scar tissue going, for the past several months. The book is called The Keto Reset Diet and it’s coming out October 3rd. This is a comprehensive presentation to educate you on the science and benefits of ketone burning and to give you step-by-step guidance to go keto the right away, avoiding the common setbacks that happen when many adopt an ill-advised approach to something as delicate and rigorous as nutritional ketosis. You can pre-order a copy from major retailers right now. We are also filming a comprehensive online multimedia educational course to give you a guided immersion experience that will be available in 2018.

Meanwhile, it’s definitely time to do a Definitive Guide….

To understand ketogenic diets, you must understand the conditions that promote ketosis. And to do that, you must understand how our bodies beta-oxidize fatty acids for energy.

  1. Fatty acids are broken down into acetyl-CoA.
  2. Acetyl-CoA combines with oxaloacetate.
  3. The acetyl-CoA/oxaloacetate duo starts the Krebs cycle.
  4. The Krebs cycle produces ATP, the body’s energy currency.
  5. Congratulations. You’ve just turned fat into energy.

Where does ketosis come in?

If the supply of acetyl-CoA exceeds the supply of oxaloacetate, the liver converts any excess acetyl-CoA into ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are an “alternative” energy source for the brain and body. 

Both carbohydrates and protein provide oxaloacetate to the liver, so both carbohydrates and protein can prevent ketone production or knock you out of ketosis. Carbohydrates also elevate insulin, which blocks the release of body fat and reduces the amount of fatty acids making their way to the liver for conversion into ketones. A ketogenic diet, then, is one that limits carbohydrate and, to a lesser extent, protein.

Ketosis occurs in certain instances without any dietary change at all:

  • Extreme physical exertion that depletes liver glycogen (total around 100 grams) and depletes around half of stored muscle glycogen (total around 400-500 grams)
  • Fasting for significant time period (at least 24 hours for most people)
  • Starvation or significant restriction in total calories for a signification time period

In all of these conditions, there’s a common ketogenic thread: liberation of body fat in excess of that which we can beta-oxidize. Any fat that isn’t beta-oxidized for energy will convert to ketones.

In one sense, ketosis is a stop-gap solution for situations where you’re burning huge amounts of body fat, like during a famine. Why would I want to mimic abject starvation if there’s all this food around?

Grocery stores are an evolutionary aberration. The constant drip of glucose into our blood is a modern luxury. For most of human history, if we wanted carbs, we had to climb a tree and extricate a bee’s nest, spend hours digging tubers, or wait around for the wild fruit to ripen. We are adapted to periods of low food availability, and, especially, low glucose availability.

Plus, humans are remarkably good at slipping into ketosis. Whereas for most other animals ketosis is difficult to achieve, a human will be mildly ketotic just waking up from a full night’s sleep. Heck, breastfed babies spend much of their time in ketosis despite drinking nutritionally balanced breastmilk. We’re clearly meant to produce and utilize ketones from time to time, and it’s safe to assume that mimicking this ancestral milieu provides adaptive benefits.

Let’s go over some of the major ones.

Adaptive Benefits of Ketosis

Treatment for Major Disease States

The ketogenic diet first emerged as a tool for clinicians to treat their patients with epilepsy. It was—and remains—the only thing with the consistent ability to prevent seizures. Whether it’s Thai kids with intractable epilepsyScandinavian kids with therapy-resistant epilepsy, or adults with refractory epilepsy, ketogenic diets just work.

Ketosis improves epilepsy via several mechanisms.

It increases conversion of glutamate into glutamine into GABA, reducing neuronal excitability.

It increases antioxidant status in the neuronal mitochondria, improving their function.

It reduces free radical formation in neurons, a likely cause of seizures.

These effects on neuronal function and health, along with the ability of aging or degenerating brains to accept and utilize ketone bodies, also have implications for other brain conditions, like Parkinson’sAlzheimer’sbipolar disorder, and many psychiatric disorders.

Ketogenic diets aren’t just beneficial for brain disorders, though.

A Spanish ketogenic diet (keto with wine, basically) cured people of the metabolic syndrome and improved health markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Over 92% of subjects improved their liver health; 21% resolved it entirely.

In cancer patients, a keto diet preserves lean mass and causes fat loss. Many researchers are exploring the use of ketogenic diets in preventing and treating cancer, although results are very preliminary.

Cognitive Function

Since ketosis can help with major brain disorders, many have wondered whether it can improve cognitive function in otherwise healthy people. Unfortunately, researchers haven’t studied the nootropic effects of ketogenic diets in healthy people—yet. They have looked at people with “milder” cognitive deficits, though, finding some promising effects.

In mild cognitive decline, a ketogenic diet improves memory.

In type 1 diabetics who experience reduced cognitive function when their blood sugar is low, increasing ketone production via medium chain triglycerides (found in coconut oilrestores it.

In adults with bad memory, adding ketones improves cognition. The higher the serum ketones, the better the scores.

In older adults, a very low-carb diet improves memory. Again, higher ketones predicts bigger improvements.

Anecdotes abound of people with intact cognitive function going on ketogenic diets and experiencing huge benefits to their mental performance. I’ve been experimenting with more protracted ketosis for some time now, and I can add my hat to the pile. What could be going on?

It may clear up brain fog, that enemy of clear thinking, by clearing ammonia from the brain and upregulating conversion of glutamate into GABA.

It definitely increases brain energy production by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis in the brain. More mitochondria, more energy production.

It tends to produce a sense of euphoria. If you can parlay that into productivity instead of getting caught up in the sensation, your mental output will increase. A cup of strong coffee helps here.

Physical Performance

Being keto-adapted has several advantages for anyone interested in physical performance.

It increases energy efficiency. At any given intensity, a keto-adapted athlete burns more fat and less glycogen than a sugar-burning athlete. Long-term elite keto athletes can burn up to 2.3 times more fat at peak oxidation and 59% more fat overall than non-keto athletes, and they do it at higher intensities. They remain in the predominantly fat-burning zone at 70% of VO2max, whereas non-keto athletes switch over from predominantly fat burning to a spike in sugar-burning at 54.9% VO2max.

It spares glycogen. Glycogen is high-octane fuel for intense efforts. We store it in the muscles and liver, but only about 2400 calories-worth—enough for a couple hours of intense activity at most. Once it’s gone, we have to carb up to replenish it. Keto-adaptation allows us to do more work using fat and ketones for fuel, thereby saving glycogen for when we really need it. Since even the leanest among us carry tens of thousands of calories of body fat, our energy stores become virtually limitless on a ketogenic diet.

It builds mitochondria. Mitochondria are the power plants of our cells, transforming incoming nutrients into ATP. The more mitochondria we have, the more energy we can utilize and extract from the food we eat—and the more performance we can wring out of our bodies. Ketosis places new demands on our mitochondria, who adapt to the new energy environment by increasing in number.

Fat Loss

Although keto is not a classical weight loss diet, it can certainly help a person lose body fat. After all, to generate ketones without eating ketogenic precursors, you have to liberate stored body fat.

But that’s not the main mechanism for ketogenic fat loss. Ketosis isn’t “magic”—it doesn’t melt body fat away. Instead, it works for many of the same reasons a standard low-carb Primal way of eating works: by reducing insulin, increasing mobilization of stored body fat, and decreasing appetite.

Ketosis suppressing appetite may be the most important feature. The overriding drive to eat more food is the biggest impediment to weight loss, and it’s the reason why most diets fail. When people attempt to eat less food despite wanting more, they butt up against their own physiology. Few win that battle.

Ketogenic dieting avoids this issue altogether, suppressing the increase in hunger hormones that normally occurs after weight loss.

Ketogenic diets are especially effective for massive weight loss. If you have a ton of weight to lose, aiming for ketosis could help you lose body fat. Again, not because of any inherent fat-burning quality of the ketones, but because in order to make ketones you must liberate stored body fat.

Many diets work in the short-term and fail in the long run. Weight loss isn’t worth anything if you can’t keep it off. Ketogenic diets appear to be good for long-term maintenance of weight loss, at least compared to low-fat diets.

How to Do It Right

I’ll have more details in The Keto Reset Diet book, but there are right ways and wrong ways to do keto. What’s wrong or right is contextual, of course. It depends on several factors.

If you’re part of a small group that uses keto to keep seizures at bay, or treat serious neurological diseases, you’ll want to diligently maintain high blood ketone levels. That means sticking to very-low-carb (5-10% of calories) and low/moderate protein (10-15% of calories). But even then, modified ketogenic diets with slightly higher carbs and relaxed protein intakes are also effective against epilepsy.

If you’re doing keto for general health or weight loss, you can handle more protein and still remain in ketosis. Protein will help stave off the muscle loss, and, because calories are reduced, you can handle a bit more protein without interfering with ketosis. An older ketogenic diet study in obese subjects shows that 50% protein diets are highly ketogenic as long as calories are kept low. And in another study, subjects eating a weight-maintaining ketogenic diet ate up to 129 grams of protein without leaving ketosis (129 grams is fairly high).

If you’re trying to lose weight, artificially boosting ketones won’t accelerate the process. Higher ketones do not enhance fat loss, but they may indicate it’s taking place.

How to Make Keto Work

Ketogenic dieting is a big jump for some people. You’re literally switching over to a new metabolic substrate. That can take some getting used to. Make sure you are well-prepared with a Primal-aligned eating pattern in place for ideally several months before you ponder a journey into nutritional ketosis.

Make a minimum commitment to six weeks of nutritional ketosis. The first three weeks will be the most difficult as you transition to new fuel sources, but then you can expect breakthroughs. Some serious athletes may experience a temporary performance dip in the early weeks, but then will come back strong after 4 weeks and beyond. Once you get to the six-week mark, the metabolic machinery is in place, and it’s hard to reverse the adaptation. Extra mitochondria don’t just disappear.

Get plenty of electrolytes. You’ll want lots of sodium, magnesium, and potassium. Try 4.5 grams sodium (about 2 teaspoons of fine salt or a little under 3 teaspoons of kosher salt), 300-400 mg magnesium, and 1-2 grams of potassium each day on top of your normal food. Going keto really flushes out water weight, and tons of electrolytes leave with it.

Eat fat, but don’t be crazy about it. Just because a ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet doesn’t mean you should eat ungodly amounts of fat. Being ketogenic is more about not eating carbohydrates than it is eating as much fat as you possibly can.

Eating extra fat in the first 4-7 days can accelerate keto-adaptation by increasing AMPK signaling. Dial it down after.

Lift heavy things. A common criticism of ketogenic diets is that they cause loss of lean mass. This isn’t totally unfounded. If your ketogenic diet reduces appetite so much that you undereat, you might lose muscle. If you’re on a super-low-protein ketogenic diet, you might lose muscle. Lifting weights prevents these issues by sending an anabolic signal to your muscles and allowing the consumption of more protein without hampering ketosis. 

Do lots of low level aerobic activity. Walk, hike, jog, cycle, row. Keep things in the aerobic HR zone (under 180 minus age in heart beats per minute), and you’ll increase your utilization of body fat, which will speed up ketone production and adaptation.

Eat vegetables. The vast majority of vegetables are keto-friendly. Not only do they provide important micronutrients and phytonutrients, they provide negligible amounts of carbohydrates.

Eat berries. Raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, and blueberries are all quite low in glycemic load and extremely high in phytonutrients. While eating a flat of strawberries isn’t very ketogenic, a large bowlful won’t knock you out.

Eat fiber. Many people on ketogenic diets tend to ignore or malign fiber. That’s a mistake. First, fiber doesn’t digest into glucose. It doesn’t “count.” Second, fiber feeds your gut biome, providing fermentable substrate for your gut bacteria to turn into beneficial short chain fatty acids and to provide support to your immune system.

How to Know if You’re Ketogenic

You can test your blood, urine, or breath ketones. There are drawbacks to each, and unless you have a medical condition necessitating a specific level of ketones, obsessive testing may be unnecessary/unwise/expensive. Forget the inexpensive urine strips, as they measure only what you excrete, not what you are making and burning.

Once you’re keto-adapted and naturally good at burning fat, the ketone measuring devices might not put up impressive numbers. That’s because, after weeks in ketosis, you have built enough metabolic machinery in your muscles that they run extremely well on free fatty acids and don’t require much additional fuel from glucose or ketones. You’re still making ketones, since your brain can’t run on fatty acids and needs them to offset the glucose that isn’t coming, but your muscles no longer require them. Many people who have been in long term ketosis can get by quite nicely on 20-30 net grams of carbs a day and might only show .4 or .7 millimolar ketones on a blood test, but they have plenty of energy from burning free fatty acids and maintain muscle mass on relatively fewer calories than when they were dependent on carbs. Few people understand this, but it’s a major benefit of keto-adaptation. You might even say that ketogenic diets are ultimately about becoming free fatty acid-adapted.

Instead of objective numbers, I prefer to go by symptoms and signs. Since you’re trying to divine what works best for you, relying on the subjective signs and symptoms you experience is perfectly legitimate. These include:

Reduced urge to snack: Being ketone-adapted means you’re less reliant on outside calories.

Steady energy: When I’m feeling full of relaxed energy, calm but not sleepy, I know I’m in ketosis.

You may have heard talk about the dreaded ketone breath, caused by the presence of the metabolite acetone (the breakdown product of the ketone bodies acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate). A sweet and fruity odor to your exhalations is a reliable indicator that you are in a state of ketosis, but it’s also a likely indicator that you are not yet super efficient at burning ketones. Don’t worry, that will come in short order.

So, are carbs out forever? What if you want to incorporate carbs for high intensity performance while maintaining the benefits of ketosis?

First of all, it may not make much of a difference if you’re just strength training. A series of recent studies looked at the effects of introducing carbs into a ketogenic diet in resistance trained adults, finding little to no benefit.

Carbs likely will help certain populations, namely CrossFitters, sprinters, and anyone else engaged in intense glycolytic work. But even then, being keto-adapted reduces the amount of glycogen you’ll use for a given intensity —so err on the side of fewer carbs and eat only as many as you actually earn.

There are two basic ways to construct a ketogenic diet that includes carbs: with one big weekly carb load (the classic CKD) or multiple smaller carb loads adjacent to training sessions (often called the targeted ketogenic diet, or TKD).

On a CKD, you spend the majority of the week and your workouts in ketosis and devote a day or a pair of days to eat lots of carbs. You might be ketogenic Monday through Friday, exercising all the while and capping the work week off with a really intense glycogen-depleting training session, then go high-carb, low-fat Saturday through Sunday to refill your depleted and newly-insulin sensitive muscle glycogen stores.

On a TKD, you spend the majority of your time in ketosis but selectively eat carbohydrate before, during, and/or after your workouts. Most people seem to benefit most from pre- and peri-workout carbs. These aren’t large carb loads — 15-30 grams of relatively fast-absorbing, simple carbs. If you don’t want to opt for dextrose or other powders, a baked potato works well.

Whatever option you choose, you’ll need to deplete glycogen if you want to include carbs in a ketogenic diet. As long as you have a glycogen debt, any carbs you eat will go toward restoring those glycogen stores and won’t interfere with ketone production.

Final Thoughts…

Also: Ketosis doesn’t have to be for life.

Going ketogenic can be refreshing. You’re not hungry like before. You’re euphoric. You have steady, even energy levels. Your brain works better. You’re leaner. You start thinking: Why not do this all the time?

A recent study of long-term (5 years) ketogenic dieting in patients with glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome found no apparent downsides. Bone mineral density, which can be a problem for growing kids on long term ketogenic diets for epilepsy, was unaffected.

Yet, I’ll admit to being a bit leery of long-term, protracted ketosis in people who aren’t treating a medical condition. It just doesn’t seem necessary. After all, while humans are unique in our ability to slip into ketosis and there are clear evolutionary precedents for being in ketosis, Grok wasn’t starving all the time. He wasn’t living through famine after famine.

Not everyone needs to be on a ketogenic diet. Even fewer need to be on a ketogenic diet for life. But I do think that everyone should try it for a few or (even better) six weeks, build and install some new mitochondria, remain long enough to get really good at burning free fatty acids in your muscles, and then return to a ketogenic state on a regular basis to keep your capacities topped up.

That’s it for me today. Have you recently tried keto, or are you hoping to? Maybe you’ve done it for a while. I’d love to hear your tips and questions. Thanks for stopping by, and have a great week, everyone.

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157 Comments on "The Definitive Guide to Keto"

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Jackson
Jackson
2 months 11 days ago

I got a very important question. In terms of standard, not ketogenic, low/moderate carb diets I’ve read where you shouldn’t count low calorie green veggies considering most of their glucose is burned during the digestion process. This method has worked for me very well, when I count carbs I think of fruits, tubers, berries, honey, etc., not broccoli and kale. But if I were wanting to experiment with ketosis should I count broccoli, kale, spinach, and other green veggies? Or does the same method apply in ketosis?

Liver King
2 months 11 days ago

Hi Jackson, I’ve been doing keto for 5+ years… I too have scar tissue on finger tips from daily (sometimes hourly) finger sticks to test ketones… To say the least, I’m obsessed with ketosis.

I’d say that the green veggies won’t make much of a difference… they’re just too high in fiber and way too low in carbs to impact ketosis. So I’d suggest to keep doing what you’re doing… include the green leafy veggies and broccoli… you probably won’t get more than a few net carbs out of them.

Ross
Ross
2 months 11 days ago

That’s a really good question.

I’ve always counted the carbs in my greens. I figure it can do no harm to add them in, and after a while the mental addition is automatic. Last night I had salmon + 300gms green cabbage (9 net carbs) + 300gms pumpkin (18 net carbs) = 27 carbs. The difference hardly seems to matter but if you’re trying to stay safely below an upper limit, say 50, it could give you peace of mind to know your position with more exactness. As I said, pretty soon the calculation becomes automatic anyway.

Pineapple Deficiency
2 months 11 days ago
Never heard of this diet before Its very interesting what got me confused was that I have always read that making your body in a ”starving feel” if i’m understanding right it’s basically the purpose of this diet your body lowers your metabolism as your body is scared that there is no food. But this diet is saying it helps you lose weight which contradicts with what i just said. I am no nutrition expert by all means if anyone could explain to me if what I said is basically a myth or why this diet works different I would… Read more »
Shary
Shary
2 months 11 days ago

I’m not understanding your reasoning, but a severe ketogenic diet (that mimics starvation) will definitely cause weight loss unless you eat enough fat to counter that effect.

jacob
jacob
2 months 11 days ago
it’s basically a myth. your body will go into starvation mode if you don’t EAT. not if you don’t eat carbs ( which keto is based on – very few carbs ). Besides, going into “starvation mode” after a a week doesn’t make evolutionary sense – if we went into that after a few days of low calorie intake and got tired, low metabolism, sleepy – we wouldn’t make the effort to go out and find food. we’d go to sleep and starve to death. This is why Americas Biggest Loser contestants put on all weight or more once they… Read more »
Patrick
2 months 11 days ago
The key element in this concept is that you must already be “fat adapted” before you start on the whole keto thing. Mark explains this in the article and it means you must already be using fat as your primary fuel rather than carbs. We all have the ability to use both but most people have lost the ability to use fat because of the constant carb consumption. This is where most nutritionists are clueless because they are scared of healthy fats. Fat is a much healthier and cleaner fuel for our bodies to run on and stops all the… Read more »
Shanna
Shanna
2 months 11 days ago
Well, because you aren’t starving. Keto reduces hunger and cravings, so you will most likely eat less. Which is to say, not an over abundance like many do. You still eat enough calories depending on your goal – more for bulking, less for cutting – but not to the extent of “starvation”. Your metabolism will slow if you go down to 500 calories, but being keto isn’t about that. You still eat enough calories for your body depending on weight, gender, etc. but it is consumed in fats and proteins instead of carbs. So your body still has plenty of… Read more »
Sharon Burress
Sharon Burress
2 months 11 days ago

Keeping the protein optimal prevents the lowered metabolism associated with so many low calorie diets. Phinney and Volek, 2 experienced researchers in ketogenic diets, recommend 0.7 g – 1.5 g protein per pound of one’s ideal or recommended weight for sex, height, and frame. Extreme athletes, body builders, pregnant or lactating women, the elderly, and those recuperating from serious injury, surgery, or illness, needing to ingest amounts closer to the higher end. They say that puts most adults needing between 90-125 grams protein per day.

Pineapple Deficiency
2 months 10 days ago

Cheers for all the replies guys know I understand why it works 😀

Monika
Monika
2 months 9 days ago

Just because you lower carbs in a keto diet, does not mean you are lowering calories as well. If you eat less carbs you up your fat intake. And don’t forget the protein you’ll eat too. It is not a calorie restricted diet at all.

Mike Torres
2 months 11 days ago

This is great to see – I’m excited to read it. Congrats!

One thing that I think is important to cover, and just about every resource on keto seems to omit, is who keto does NOT work for. Speaking personally, the simple act of adding a Bulletproof coffee several times per week spikes my lipids in an extremely bad way. So would be great to cover that somehow – how to know when keto and/or moderate to high-fat diets are just not in the cards for you.

Michael
Michael
2 months 11 days ago

I’d love to hear more on this as well. As someone who has at least one APOe4 gene, I’m a bit concerned about increasing my fat intake.

Laura
2 months 10 days ago

Yes, I agree. Although I saw the link for Alzheimer’s benefiting from a Keto diet in the article, I’ve always read that people with APOe4 would do worse on this type of diet. I’d love an explanation or some clarification. Thanks, Mark!

Clay
Clay
2 months 11 days ago
I would guess that your bullet proof coffee is made with saturated fat (butter or coconut oil). For me, lots of saturated fat takes my already high (well above above 100) HDL and pushes it sky high. That’s good,. However, it takes my LDL scary high as well – and not proportionally high. However, a high fat, lower saturated fat diet doesn’t do that and I get the HDL benefit with out the LDL issues. I’m probably a saturated fat hyper-responder, So no more gobbling fatty meats daily, pounding dark chocolate and spoon fulls of coconut oil. Keep my fat… Read more »
barry
barry
2 months 11 days ago
Interesting, I was discussing saturated fat hyper responders last Saturday day during our seminar (local WAPF chapter). It seems you’re doing the best thing. Did you noticed if your triglycerides went up substantially as well? For hyper responders and/or people with pre-existing heart disease we usually recommend more omega 3 fatty acids. Instead of fish 2 or 3 times a week we recommend 5 times a week. This lowers the triglycerides and c-reactive proteins thus negating any inflammatory response which might cause LDL oxidation. Also getting either wild game or grass fed ruminant meat will give you more stearic acid.… Read more »
HealthyHombre
HealthyHombre
2 months 10 days ago

Giving up dark chocolate would be tough for me Clay. 🙂

David
David
2 months 8 days ago

Clay,
Check out Dave Feldman’s N=1 experiments as a hyper responder. He clearly shows that as a hyper responder, his blood lipid results are inversely correlated with the amount of fat consumed in the five days prior to the test. Others have followed his protocol and gotten the same inverse correlation results.
Makes you wonder why Big Pharma recommends blood lipid results be measured while one is fasted
(Google Dave Feldman cholesterol)

Robert
Robert
2 months 11 days ago

Thank you for this information. For many of the health benefits you list, I’d like to get into ketosis for a time. But I do NOT want to lose weight. I don’t have any pounds to spare. The past couple of times I’ve tried this diet it was hard for me to maintain my weight. I have no fear of healthy fats like lard, butter, heavy cream, etc, but it was still hard to eat enough. Any advice for us skinny guys and gals who want to get into ketosis without losing weight?

Shary
Shary
2 months 11 days ago
Eat a lot more healthy fats. My son was on a ketogenic diet for seizure control years ago. He was losing too much weight very rapidly and was put on “ice cream” three times a day. I made this with oil, heavy cream, and a non-sugar sweetener–all weighed and measured according to a custom-formulated medical “recipe.” It worked like a charm. Contrary to a popular internet meme, fat will absolutely make you fat if you eat enough of it. In the case of maintaining ketosis, sufficient fat will likewise stop unwanted weight loss. Experiment to find out what amount is… Read more »
Tom
Tom
2 months 11 days ago
if you eat enough protein, like the article states, you will keep your muscles. which is what you don’t want to lose. unless you want to keep body fat? 100 grams of fat is 900 calories so you need perhaps 150-200 grams of fat which should be pretty easy if you cook veggies in fat and go for fatty cuts of meat and perhaps a bullet proof coffee, 100 grams of protein ( 400 calories ) and 50 grams of carbs ( 200 calories ) which ads up to around 2000-2300 calories which should be enough for a male. a… Read more »
Mark Simons
Mark Simons
2 months 9 days ago

Tom, too much protein will knock you out of ketosis.

Tom
Tom
2 months 8 days ago
Mark, 100 grams of protein is definitely not too much for a male that works out. He wanted to keep his weight intact and I assume he meant muscle mass, not fat. Depends on his height, current weight etc. I think general rule is 0.5 – 1 gram per kg of body weight. a 200 gram steak for dinner, some cheese, a few eggs and that gives you enough protein. I went keto and am quite fit with little body fat. Added dinner to dinner fasts twice a week and my DEXA scan showed i still lost 2kg of fat… Read more »
Grant
Grant
2 months 11 days ago

I agree that very few people need to be in ketosis permanently or even for long, extended periods.

That first month or so to adapt is such a huge benefit, though. You can freely shift in and out of ketosis and enjoy both sides once you have that set.

As long as you remain primal of course 🙂

Susanne
2 months 11 days ago

I am attracted by the benefits of keto, but if it depletes water and electrolytes that much, I probably shouldn’t do it. I have Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, and I already have to supplement with water and electrolytes to increase my blood volume (and keep at bay fatigue, lightheadedness, dyspnea, tachycardia, and a few other symptoms). Keto might be a bad idea for me. Any POTSies here who have ever tried keto?

Alaina
Alaina
2 months 11 days ago
My mom for 35+ years has been working with all the heavy hitters in POTS research at Mayo Clinic so I asked her your question 🙂 Now I am not a physician, and this is not a prescription or medical advice, I’m just sharing with you her opinion: Her response: “If you have POTS and you “Get plenty of electrolytes, sodium, magnesium, and potassium at 4.5 grams sodium (about 2 teaspoons of fine salt or a little under 3 teaspoons of kosher salt), 300-400 mg magnesium, and 1-2 grams of potassium each day on top of your normal food,” there… Read more »
Alaina
Alaina
2 months 11 days ago

*25+ years* TOTAL typo. sorry

anonymous
anonymous
2 months 11 days ago

I’ve had great results going keto, but one thing concerns me: I’ve heard that ketogenic diets can cause false positives on drunk driving breathalyzers. Anyone have any information on this?

Starmice
Starmice
2 months 11 days ago

I had heard that too and had heard to insist that they take you down to the station for a blood test rather than a breathalyzer test.

Marissa
Marissa
2 months 10 days ago

This is only true for very old breathalyzers but you can always request a blood test.

Richard
2 months 11 days ago

This is all new to me Mark and I love learning new things! Going to start dropping hints to the kids now that I’d love the Keto reset diet book for Father’s Day! 😉

Venita
Venita
2 months 11 days ago

I have started using a keto diet to help combat dibilitating migraines. I am about 20 pounds over weight so I am hoping it helps there and with my insulin sensitivity as well. This is great info I can trust! Thanks Mark!

Investigator
Investigator
2 months 11 days ago

I stopped getting migraines when I cut out wheat, dairy, preservatives, sulfites, and nightshade vegetables. Everybody’s different, but Ketosis doesn’t make a difference for me. Just my 2c.

Jess
Jess
2 months 10 days ago
It worked for me and was the reason I started Primal, then Keto many years ago. After too many of those migraine buggers, it was a god-send. The only downside was, as Mark wrote about, that I became too adapted, too satiated and got to a point where I ate too few total calories and didn’t keep an eye on my loss of muscle mass. Never having done that, nor had an issue with eating, I was blind to it and the pendulum swung too far the other way. You will really likely love the benefits to your migraines and… Read more »
Jenn
Jenn
2 months 11 days ago

I did keto for about 6 months, I saw NO increase in energy or clearer thinking. I am 46, hashimoto’s, non classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, most likely pre menopausal.

Ion Freeman
Ion Freeman
2 months 11 days ago

OK, I’ll do it. I’ll be more strict about the Primal Blueprint until July 4th, then try keto for six weeks. I am training for the Chicago Marathon on October 8th, though. Is there a conflict between keto and endurance training?

Mathieu
Mathieu
2 months 11 days ago

If you want to fail at your marathon, go keto 🙂
Seriously for high performance in sport, especially endurance, it’s a no go. If utltra endurance athlete are usually low carbs, but not keto on a daily basis.
Moderate your carbs during training, do some workout fasted / with glycogen stores depleted, and you’ll get all the metabolic benefits. And load up on carbs before the race.
That is, if you want to perform at your best.
Eat good quality carbs though 😉

Tom
Tom
2 months 11 days ago

I’m assuming you haven’t read Marks book Primal Endurance?

Shanna
Shanna
2 months 11 days ago

Carlos Dones – ultra marathon runner. Ran 170 miles keto. Like Mark said, when doing crossfit or sprints, you’re more likely to want a small carb boost. Not endurance.

Mathieu
Mathieu
2 months 11 days ago

You can run for a long time sure, but you wont run fast 😉
No world class athletes are keto. If you want to perform at your best, you need carbs.

Ion Freeman
Ion Freeman
2 months 11 days ago

I do not want to run fast

Mathieu
Mathieu
2 months 10 days ago

By “fast”, I mean “at your best”. So it all depends if you want to optimize your race and set a personal record.

Shanna
Shanna
2 months 11 days ago
Not really! Many endurance runners use nut butters, coconut oil packets and/or salt capsules to keep energy and electrolytes up, but you’re body has roughly 40,000 calories stored in fat at any given time, where glucose is about 2,400. So you won’t hit that “wall” when your glucose stores run out and your body switches to burning fat. You may see a decrease in performance the first few weeks, when your body is adjusting to a new fuel source. That is where you’ll want to take it a little lighter on workouts, and increase back to your normal routine after… Read more »
Ion Freeman
2 months 11 days ago
It’ll actually be the following Monday, after my brother-in-law’s wedding. I can squeeze six weeks in before the total solar eclipse, which I expect to involve a lot of carbohydrates. It’ll give me another six weeks before the marathon itself, @Mathieu, so I’m not currently planning on doing the event keto unless the experience sways me. @Tom, I’m about halfway through. I’ve been that far through for a while, training with the H7. It’s time to explore the remainder of the book. @Shanna, after reading Mark’s “Cognitive Effects” post (linked), I’m interested in foul-tasting Esthers during a long run. What… Read more »
Angela
Angela
2 months 11 days ago

I would like to have more examples of what a day in the life would be for ketogenic diet. Grams and percentages make it hard to visualize what a person actually eats. Walk us through actual meal examples for different people (Male/Female, Maintain/Lose weight, etc.)

Also, for someone who can’t tolerate dairy, what are other examples of fats to include besides coconut oil?

Michael
Michael
2 months 11 days ago

Can you tolerate Ghee? Regardless, I’d recommend Avocado Oil or Beef tallow/ Duck fat as well.

Elizabeth Resnick
2 months 11 days ago
Hey Angela, I consider myself to be “borderline” keto. I don’t measure anything, but feel amazing and energized and find it really keeps cravings at bay. Here is a typical day…I am up super early (5 am) and have coffee blended with unsalted butter and mct oil. Sometimes add collagen for the skin benefits, but think I get hungry sooner with the added protein. Later in the am I’ll have another coffee made the same way, usually decaf. I might not get hungry till 12 or 1. Lunch is usually something like sardines or grass fed burger and veggies, plenty… Read more »
Jennifer
Jennifer
2 months 11 days ago

But Elizabeth, you are the collagen queen! If not in your morning coffee, when do you recommend to consume collagen? (Thanks for the real life food examples!)

Liver King
2 months 11 days ago
TYPICAL 1ST MEAL IS A DELICIOUS SHAKE AND IT LOOKS LIKE THIS… -Wallaby Organic / Grass fed yogurt (2 cups or 150g) -NOW Brand MCT oil (1-2 tablespoons; up to 30g- dose to tolerability) -Organic raw virgin coconut oil (2 to 3 tablespoons or 30 to 45g) -Organic almond butter (2 tablespoons or 30g) -Organic unrefined red palm oil (1 tablespoon or 15g) -Grassfed Collagen / Gelatin (10-20g) -Himalayan sea salt — 1/4 tsp (2g) -Organic cinnamon — 2g -Organic / Grassfed vanilla protein powder (1 scoop) -Organic banana (optional) -Organic / Pasture raised raw eggs (4 to 6 large… Read more »
Shary
Shary
2 months 10 days ago
Angela, a ketogenic diet isn’t necessarily full of weird components. Just stick with meat/fish protein, eggs, low-glycemic veggies, and healthy fats. Macadamia nuts are okay in moderation. Skip grain products, legumes, sugars, and starchy veggies. Limit or temporarily eliminate most fruit. A strict keto diet often limits portion sizes as well, although hunger is seldom a problem. Ketogenic diets are currently “in.” However, a true keto diet is a fairly drastic departure from normal eating patterns and therefore not easy to stick with. Unless you have a specific reason (such as a medical condition or needing to lose a lot… Read more »
Starmice
Starmice
2 months 11 days ago

I was fairly keto for a lot of last year and lost quite a bit of weight pretty easily. I tend to do well for a couple of months and then offroad a bit. I’d been supplementing with exogenous ketones when I go on vacation or drink alcohol, figuring that my brain could still use the exegenous ones even if I temporarily stopped making my own. Seems to work but not sure if this is healthy or not.

Alex
Alex
2 months 11 days ago

Is there any evidence to indicate that being keto long term has any harm? I’m currently about 10 months into a ketogenic life and have dropped from 265 to 175. I’m past most cravings for carbohydrates and sweeteners so I don’t foresee any trouble eating this way for the indefinite future. However, I am intrigued to see if there are any adverse effects to long term ketosis that have been reported in studies.

Shanna
Shanna
2 months 11 days ago

I just read a new study about obese patients going keto for 24 months. That’s the longest I’ve seen a study done. They found no adverse effects within those 24 weeks. There is anecdotal evidence of people being on a Ketogenic diet for well over 10 years with no negative effects, but there aren’t scientific studies that long term yet.

Sharon Burress
Sharon Burress
2 months 11 days ago
Yay! You’ve done your homework! An excellent article. I’ve been on a ketogenic diet for 9 months and have lost 119 pounds so far. I have only 35 pounds to go to be at the weight I was in my 30s. I am turning 75 this summer. I am not hungry! Every other time I have been this close to goal, I started hungering and craving and just like a spring released, burst back into weight gain far faster than it was ever lost. Not this time. This is my way of eating for life! I will possibly add back… Read more »
Wendy Hall
2 months 11 days ago
Hi Mark, I have several of your books (the last I bought was Primal Endurance since I am a marathoner) and loved eating Paleo for years. I run into the ketogenic diet this past January and decided to try it. I used the recipes from another author’s book on ketogenic cleanse and I’ve never felt so fantastic after the 3rd week. The euphoria is real! I finally was able to wean myself off from ADHD medication that caused my HR to stay too high. As a full time college student, mom and wife I needed an alternative to stay focused… Read more »
Heather B
Heather B
2 months 11 days ago
Mark – I’m happy to read about your book. Will it deal with the (relatively uncommon but horrible) “keto rash”? There is at least one website devoted to this phenomenon: theketorash.com. Andreas Eenfeldt (the Diet Doctor) also addresses it briefly on his website. I’ve attempted ketogenic diets many times, in part for Type 1 diabetes blood sugar control. In the couple of weeks before the rash kicks in, I enjoy normal blood sugar levels, almost 24/7 (as measured by a continuous glucose monitor). The rash, which comes on quickly and covers most of my torso — a typical pattern —… Read more »
Susan
Susan
2 months 11 days ago

I have tried a keto diet and I was always hungry. I followed the guidelines set forth by Marie Emmerich and Jimmy Moore (I admire both of them very much)–it just wasn’t for me. I have found what works for me now and I’m sticking with it.

jim
2 months 11 days ago
Mark, I been reading about keto on web, from diabetic consultants on line, books , for a while. It seems to point to extreme low carb ( 20-30 g. daily) and moderate protein, and high fat consumption for most energy. Those that study it, eating all the saturated fat, what are they saying that does to the lipids, the cholesterol and triglycerides in blood stream? If we take Lipitor to lower cholesterol and then we begin to eat more and more saturated fat , is that shown to be not increasing lipids too high in blood stream of those who… Read more »
Melanie
Melanie
2 months 6 days ago
Hi Jim, a ketogenic diet can actually improved blood lipids significantly. Check out the following study from Jeff Volek’s group: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/132/7/1879.long While the participants saw a small increase in LDL, the LDL particle size increased favorably, HDL increased more dramatically, and triglycerides decreased. Overall a very favorable change in blood lipids, and the participants were not even in full-on ketosis for most of the time (as evidenced by their b-HB levels of 0.28 mM at the end of the study), and it was a short study as well. Anecdotally, most people have beautiful blood lipid profiles on a strict ketogenic… Read more »
jim
2 months 11 days ago
Mark, an added question. After reading this for some time, on pro keto, I have an e-mail from diatribe.org to desire to provide medical oversight of a keto diet, but charge around $400 a month, I am guessing without going back to look again. There is a wellness doctor in my community that wants to charge $7000 , no insurance help in most cases, for help on keto diet for 6 months of oversight, and I got an e-mail yesterday from a diabetic consultant who has done on web diabetic web presentations, His cost was as I recall, lower than… Read more »
Shary
Shary
2 months 10 days ago
I’m not Mark, but I suggest you shop around if you want help with a keto diet. $7000 is pretty much highway robbery. So is $400/mo. There are always going to be unscrupulous people willing to take advantage of the latest diet trend. Avoid them!! Yes, you can do the diet yourself but you need some nutritional knowledge. Learn as much as you can about it, including what kinds of foods you can and can’t eat. If that seems insurmountable, find a doctor who treats T2D using dietary changes or a qualified dietitian. Buy a package of keto sticks to… Read more »
jim
2 months 10 days ago
Shary. the 3rd pay me for service offer is from a health education who has a functional medicine certification. he wants $250 a month for 10 months of keto oversight, and I am doubting his service does any lab work., might tell you to get some lab work done. Its all by internet with a few phone calls. So I have seen $7K, $400 a month, and $250/ month for 10 months. Looks like folks , making use of some level of keto diet, earn money telling you how to improve your type II diabetes. I guess that is not… Read more »
Mark Simons
Mark Simons
2 months 9 days ago

You could check out Intensive Dietary Management. They don’t give medical advise, unless you are a Canadian living in Ontario, but they work with you to give dietary/keto/fasting advise. It’s 1000 Canadian dollars (about 700 USD) yearly.

Fox1
Fox1
2 months 11 days ago

I’m so glad you finally made a post like this. I’ve done keto on and off for awhile now and had great success. You always bring a moderate, intelligent view to topics and you always back it with research.

Elizabeth Resnick
2 months 11 days ago

I consider myself to be borderline keto these days. Def higher fat/lower carbs. I am way too lazy to track anything, but having more fat keeps me extremely focused and energized. I’m a pretty positive person to begin with, but I think it even affects my mood (in a good way!)

Grokalicious
Grokalicious
2 months 11 days ago

Keto is absolutely what got me in the best shape yet. I started with your Primal Blueprint and segued easily and effortlessly into Keto. I am leaner than ever, have tons of endless energy and have never looked better. This, at 59 years young.

Thanks for all you do for us!

Mike
Mike
2 months 11 days ago

Would anyone like to comment on Dr. Mercola’s most recent book Fat For Fuel. Would it contain similar ideas as are being discussed here?

Steve A
Steve A
2 months 11 days ago

I liked the book. Lots of good information, although it is geared toward medical intervention.

Dana Leigh Lyons
2 months 11 days ago

Thrilled about your coming book! Though keto definitely isn’t for everyone, I thrive on a very low-carb, sometimes-keto eating plan. So too do many of my clients (when that aligns with their individual needs and goals).

After my “past life” as a sugar/carb junkie dependent on regular infusions of white stuff, eating this way is so freeing. My mind is clearer, my energy is sustained, and I don’t have any need or desire to snack between meals – to name but a few of the many benefits!

Marissa
Marissa
2 months 11 days ago

You’ve touched on it before and here again but for most who do not *need* keto do you encourage cyclical ketosis as in not 24/7/365. In my opinion and experience and just thinking from an evolutionary and physiologic (maintain insulin sensitivity and reduce physiological insulin resistance of keto, gut microniome, nutrients) standpoint it makes sense that most would benefit from non constant ketosis. Any thoughts?

AK8
AK8
2 months 11 days ago

Hi – Does anyone have resources on the effect of the keto diet has on kidneys? My dad got a heart transplant 5+ years ago and unfortunately the immunosuppressants they put him on destroyed his kidneys over time. He’s now close to needing dialysis. I’ve read keto can help prevent further degeneration, but would love to get your guys’ input. Thanks!

Dan
Dan
2 months 11 days ago
After reading “Primal Endurance” I decided to give keto eating a try. Today, 6/72017 is day 3 of week 12. I’ve experienced essentially all the symptoms you describe in the book. My goal was/is fat loss and I’m getting leaner by the day. I use nutritional software to closely monitor my eating. I’m keeping my carb intake less than 10 grams/day. I’m also incorporating I.F. to help things along. I fast from 6 p.m. to 12 noon the next day every day. I’m surprised that I’m not more hungry than I am. Even after fasting for 18 hours I’m not… Read more »
Alex
Alex
2 months 11 days ago

So what is the difference between keto and primal?

Steve A
Steve A
2 months 11 days ago

Mainly lower carb. Look up the Carbohydrate Curve in The Primal Blueprint. Keto is the area of lowest carbs: 50g or less

Mark
Mark
2 months 9 days ago

Most keto advocates would say 20-30g carbs max per day.

Mike
Mike
2 months 11 days ago

Great tips on electrolytes. Possibly the number one mistake newbies to keto make is insufficient electrolytes especially sodium. Easy sodium fix is a nice warm cup of bouillon or an all in one electrolytes supplement like this one:

https://www.ketoshop.com/products/keto-lytes-electrolyte-and-keto-flu-support

Jarrett
Jarrett
2 months 11 days ago
Thanks for posting this. I’ve been loosely following the Primal Blueprint for sometime, but went keto (CKD I learned today) at the end of 2016. I’ve been hoping to hear your thoughts on this diet. I’m really enjoying the benefits so far. When I started keto, I was plateaued having lost about 115lbs and couldn’t get past it. Now after a few months on the keto diet, I’m down another 32 lbs making it 147 lbs total lost now. I’m also leaner, have very consistent energy and no longer need sugar on longer bike rides as I once did. I… Read more »
Steve A
Steve A
2 months 11 days ago

I started eating very low carb when I started testing fasted blood sugar and found it regularly over 100. Two years later I’ve been I ketosis a few times and blood sugar averages about 97, but I’d like to see it in optimal 80-90 range. Anyone know if strict Keto for 6 weeks as Mark suggests will do the trick? I’ve also read in Fat For Fuel and The Blood Code that sometimes you need some more carbs to get a drop, but hasn’t worked for me, just makes it bounce around more.

David
David
2 months 8 days ago

Steve
Measure your HOMA-IR to see if you’re insulin resistant or sensitive. When you’re very low carb or keto, your fasting blood sugar may be high because your muscles are fueling from fat, refusing glucose to spare it for your brain.

Grant Ross
Grant Ross
2 months 11 days ago

In typical Mark fashion, this is one of the best summaries of keto that I’ve ever read. I’ve noticed over the years how many of the success stories mention people dipping into keto as a tool yet keeping Primal Blueprint as their base “go-back-to” lifestyle diet. This book is both timely and was just a matter of time. Totally looking forward to it!

Linda
Linda
2 months 11 days ago

Always a plethora of information.
I’ll look forward to reading your book!!

Taylor
Taylor
2 months 11 days ago

How long do I need to worry about pushing electrolytes? All the time or just as I start out and my body is equalizing by peeing a lot?

Becky Sodon
Becky Sodon
2 months 11 days ago

A few questions:
1) How do you know if you have depleted your glycogen? Is it that “can’t do much more” feeling in your muscles?
2) If you are eating carbs to replace glycogen, will you stay in ketosis?
3) Going along with the question, who shouldn’t be in ketosis, I have read on Paleomom that those with autoimmune should not do a ketogenic diet. What can you say to that? (though type 1 diabetes is autoimmune and you say it helped that)

Fitforme
Fitforme
2 months 11 days ago

Do sugar alcohols in sugar free gum affect ketosis!? I sometimes chew a lot of gum while at work and worried it may be affecting my body going into Keto: thank you for any insights.

HealthyHombre
HealthyHombre
2 months 10 days ago

I’m going to focus on eating primal, exercising and getting more sleep … but best wishes to everyone who is doing this.

Jean
Jean
2 months 10 days ago

Thank you for this article. I’m in the UK and about to start chemotherapy for 6 months. My oncologist, quite enlightened for the NHS, mentioned a ‘high protein diet’ when I asked for advice which I took to mean low sugar. I am going to try to stay in keto while in treatment as I have read this supports your own cells while stressing the cancer cells. Looking forward to finding out as much as possible.

Sheila G
Sheila G
2 months 10 days ago

Good luck with your chemo Jean and I hope all goes well for you. regards Sheila G in Edinburgh

Jean
Jean
2 months 10 days ago

Thank you, Sheila

Lina
Lina
2 months 10 days ago
Jean, I’ve been reading up a lot on this recently. You’ve probably come across these but in case not: Tripping Over the Truth Optimal Terrain Consulting (Nasha Winters I think is the main person behind it. She was just interviewed recently on the Two Keto Dudes Podcast) Dom D’Agostino has 3 episodes on Tim Ferriss’ podcast, and cancer + keto are recurring themes. From everything I’ve read, yes, keto is a fantastic adjunct to traditional therapies, and outright fasting (not too hard if you’re already keto-adapted) before chemo greatly mitigates the side effects of the chemo, plus further weakens the… Read more »
Lina
Lina
2 months 10 days ago

The formatting in my first reply makes it look like one long string of info! Sorry about that. Hopefully this is more clear: Tripping Over the Truth is a book about the metabolic theory of cancer. It’s interesting and well-written. Optimal Terrain is a consulting company and they probably have a ton of leads on their website. Dom D’Agostino is a researcher who has appeared on a number of podcasts in recent years.

Lina
Lina
2 months 10 days ago

Jean – Actually my first reply has disappeared, so I’m trying again with this portion:

From everything I’ve read, yes, keto is a fantastic adjunct to traditional therapies, and outright fasting (not too hard if you’re already keto-adapted) for several days before chemo greatly mitigates the side effects of the chemo, plus further weakens the cancer cells b/c they’re glucose dependent.

Good luck to you!

Jean
Jean
2 months 9 days ago

Thank you, Lina, for taking all that trouble. I have ‘Tripping Over The Truth’. It is a useful book.I will look for the interviews you mention. Fasting may suit me better than strong keto as I have been unlucky with ‘keto rash’ in the past but I will try both. If nothing else it turns me from a passive ‘patient’ into an active participant in my treatment.

Lina
Lina
2 months 8 days ago

oh, I’m happy to see this! I was hoping you would see the responses to your post. Active participant sounds great 🙂
There’s a new thread in the forums on cancer. I listed a bit more there and there will likely be some more interesting additions to the thread over the next few days.
I’ve actually found it kind of frustrating to have found all these amazing resources and know that most cancer patients won’t ever come across them!

Jean
Jean
2 months 7 days ago

I hadn’t thought of looking at the forum but I have now – thanks!

Kate
Kate
2 months 10 days ago

While we’re waiting for Mark’s book, those in search of some answers or just more info might like to Google Maria Emmerich. She has a very informative site (though a little confusing to navigate, I find) and it has a search function, too. Plus recipes, life stories, etc. Like Mark, she has a scientific approach, not a woo-woo one!

Lilianne Mujica-Parodi
2 months 10 days ago

Just wanted to mention that it’s not quite true that there’s no research on the effects of ketosis on neural/cognitive functioning of healthy individuals. Our laboratory is currently conducting research on this topic at Massachusetts General Hospital. Preliminary results appear promising and we hope to publish in the near future.

Dave
Dave
2 months 10 days ago

Zero carb is what I do. It’s not keto. The human species did not evolve tracking macros. The feral human species evolved as nomadic tribes tracking, and following herds, such as mastodons, and other herding animals, eating as much as they wanted, as often as they wanted. A domesticated member of the human species might track macros. I prefer to be feral, by eating meat, and drinking water instinctively.

Mtngirl4ever
Mtngirl4ever
2 months 10 days ago

I really hate the word diet. I like to refer to this as a lifestyle choice just as Primal is a lifestyle, not a diet. When people hear the word “diet” they automatically think weightloss and forget the health/nutrition aspect of it. So Mark, can you drop the “diet” from the title and maybe add “life” ?

Sheryl, PHC
Sheryl, PHC
2 months 10 days ago

Hi, Mark!
Great meeting you at PFX!
Is ketosis in women the same as in men? Should women cycle through more carbs or utilize a specific style of ketosis to prevent any thyroid issues? I’ve heard some women say that ketosis has helped thyroid issues and others claim that it has slowed theirs down. (I don’t know which style they were using, just “ketosis.”)
Many thanks,
Sheryl Janosky, PHC

Matt
Matt
2 months 10 days ago
I ran keto (shooting for 50g carb max, some call that modified keto, sometimes a bit higher but quite often 30-40g and a lot of that was fiber) straight for 8 weeks. During that time frame: I lost ~21lbs, had absolutely ZERO cravings for carbs and especially sugars, had steady energy all day, appetite was virtually always low, and overall felt pretty great. First week were a bit hard, but very doable, I was also taking in exogenous ketones at that time and I do think it helped get me over that initial hump faster. The one thing though that… Read more »
Alexander
2 months 9 days ago

I tried Keto for a number of months but was basically forced to give it up due to my gf and our two kids. It’s was just getting too much of a pain to not eat together as a family and with all the carbs in the house I was cheating too much. Would love to hear about some science-based info on keto and kids and how to do keto in a family with non-keto family members.

Betcie
Betcie
2 months 8 days ago

Congrats on this new book! I can’t wait and am VERY interested in it – especially as a hardcore dancer (daily training) 53 year old perimenopausal woman. I’ve experimented with what I understood Ketogenic diet to be and found the effort not difficult during my ‘2-month rest periodization’ window but am confused about how to remain Keto and even Primal now that I’m back into intense training window. I seem to need more carbs…Will continue with Primal until book comes out and hope for clarity then!

David
David
2 months 8 days ago

I was beginning to think your comment board was completely ambushed by menopausal hypothyroid women. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that)

Ignacio Martialay
Ignacio Martialay
2 months 6 days ago

Hi! I have a question regarding what you say about fiber “not counting” as carbs. I live in Spain, so I will write things in grams, sorry for the trouble…

Let’s say I check a nutrition label on a bag of almonds. It says (for example) that it contains 6g of carbohydrates per 100g of almonds, out of which 2g are fiber.

Does that mean that if I eat 100g of those almonds only 4g of the carbohydrates which they include count towards my 40-50g daily carbohydrates?

Thanks in advance

Rita
Rita
2 months 5 days ago
After 3 years of partial ketosis (3-4 days/wk) I have developed hypothyroidism. I didn’t need to lose weight, just went on HFLC diet—about 70% fat, 15% carb, and 15% protein for health and longevity, to get off sweets roller-coaster, and to avoid going back into metabolic syndrome. I’m just wondering whether increasing net carbs from my usual 30-60/day would be beneficial or if using no iodized sodium for 3 years has caused it. I used only himalayan pink salt the first 2 yrs, and mix ½ himalayan and ½ celtic sea salt for the past year. I also have eaten… Read more »
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