Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Mark's Daily Apple

29 Sep

Dear Mark: Alcohol and Training; Sitting and Standing; A Useful Workout

snatchFor today’s edition of Dear Mark, we’ve got a three-parter. First up, I explain how alcohol consumption can affect muscle protein synthesis in a competitive weightlifter. Even what seems like a moderate dose can still affect how we recover from our workouts. Second, what should a person do if they really can’t stand standing at work? If the chair is looking really attractive after a morning workout, should we give in to our desire to sit or try to tough it out? The answer may surprise you. And finally, a friend of the blog writes in with a perfect example of a meaningful workout session that I just had to share with you guys.

Let’s go:

Keep reading…

28 Sep

Weekend Link Love – Edition 315

weekend link love2Several weeks ago, Leslie Klenke appeared on KCRA in Sacramento to give a Primal cooking demo. This time, she’s showing a group of teens how to exercise Primally. Check it out!

Research of the Week

All it takes is a millisecond of light to disrupt your circadian rhythm during sleep.

In women, getting 7.6 hours of sleep is linked to fewer sick days. In men, it’s 7.8.

Is there any other pursuit that people willingly engage in and proclaim to be supremely healthy where total body shutdown is highly probable and accepted? I’ve witnessed this happening numerous times in extreme endurance events.

Keep reading…

27 Sep

Hot and Sour Soup

HotSourSoupHot and sour soup, with its bracing spicy and sour flavor, tastes intuitively like food that will give your immune system a boost. At the very least, it’ll warm your belly and provide a satisfying meal, and with this recipe, no take-out menu is needed.

You can choose to seek out authentic ingredients (like lily buds and cloud ear fungus) or simply go with dried shiitake mushrooms. Likewise, ingredients like soy sauce, sugar and red rice vinegar can be replaced with coconut aminos and plain rice vinegar. This recipe also nixes tofu and cornstarch, resulting in a soup that isn’t traditional but delicious nonetheless.

Keep reading…

26 Sep

Primal Living at Any Age: One Stubborn Senior’s Testimonial

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

real life stories stories 1 2In addition to asking about whether Primal is useful for seniors, MDA members often ask about how to get stubborn senior fathers, grandfathers, husbands, etc. to go Primal. Since I am old (71) and was fairly stubborn when I started Primal, my story may be of interest. (I am sharing what I know from personal experience, but what I have to say may still be relevant if you’re younger and/or female.)

Four years ago, I had been faithfully following most conventional health care wisdom, aside from always refusing statins. However, I had given up gluten many years before. In the past, I had done Atkins, vegetarianism, veganism and Macrobiotics. It was then that Mark spoke to my running group, which I had joined to successfully walk a half marathon. What he said made sense, but I stubbornly refused to completely give up daily white rice, white potatoes, corn tortillas, dairy, or beans. And I sure wasn’t going to fast when there was food available. But I did take some advice.

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25 Sep

How to Succeed with a Growth Mindset

dontquitA couple decades ago a Stanford University psychologist by the name of Carol Dweck became famous when she suggested parents praise their children’s efforts instead of compliment them on their “inherent” intelligence (“Joey, you’re such a smart boy! “Suzy, how’s Mama’s smart girl?”). The descriptive accolades telling kids how intelligent they are, her research demonstrated, actually undermined children’s self-confidence and willingness to venture new tasks or unfamiliar material. On the opposite side of the spectrum, acknowledgement of children’s engagement and perseverance resulted in their aiming for bigger challenges.

The research, Dweck claimed, identified what she called a differentiation of “mindset.”  When we’re operating from a “fixed” mindset, for example, we believe our talents and abilities are somehow set or predetermined. We’re either innately good at something or we’re not. When we accept a “growth mindset,” however, we view achievement through the lens of effort. We believe we have the power to develop our skills regardless of initial capacity. Clearly, we grown-ups can glean something essential from this concept. What could a “growth mindset” do for our health endeavors? For losing weight? For becoming fit? For changing our eating habits? For our happiness and success in general? And how would it change our self-talk and motivational strategy?

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