Category: Motivation

Dear Mark: Common Stumbling Blocks

Dear Mark,

As a newbie to MDA I’m interested in doing the Primal Challenge for the year. I’m sold on the idea of PB and understand how it should work. The problem is I’ve had one failure after another when it comes to diets, and I’m a little gun-shy going in. The PB is definitely different than diets I’ve tried in the past. I just want to feel prepared this time for the stumbling blocks and know what to look out for. I’d love to hear your advice and tips!

I’ve been hearing from a lot of new folks since the New Year’s Primal Challenge. Thanks for your comments and questions. I’m thrilled you’ve all joined us!

Read More

Top 10 Reasons to Stay Healthy

We know by now that we need to work out, need to eat the right foods and do stuff that is “healthy for us,” but sometimes when we’re waking up at 5 am to hit the treadmill before work or shunning the donuts at the breakfast meeting, its easy to lose sight of what we’re doing this all for.

So here’s the quick & dirty, Mark’s Daily Apple top 10 reasons why you need and want to stay healthy. Stick this list up on your fridge, tuck it in your workout bag, heck, have it tattooed on your forehead… whatever it takes to keep you motivated to lead that healthy lifestyle!

Read More

Research Suggests Exercise Motivation Associated with Body Weight

New research conducted by researchers at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, Canada suggests that thinner people are more motivated to exercise than their heavier peers.

In a study initially devised to determine how much rats are willing to pay for an opportunity to exercise, the researchers found that slimmer rats were more motivated to work out than their larger peers. In addition, the more weight the rat lost, the more motivated it was to hop on the wheel, so much so that some of the rats in the study quite literally exercised and starved themselves to death (a phenomenon that also occurs in our society in the form of activity- or exercise-anorexia).

Read More

How Our Eyes Deceive Our Appetites

Your Gut Is All in Your Head (Sort of)

One of this year’s Ig Nobel awards goes to a researcher who has gotten to the bottom, if you will, of insatiable appetites. (The Ig Nobel awards go to science that is entertaining or odd, though typically the research is still of value.) Brian Wansik, a nutrition professor and the author of “Mindless Eating”, won the award for his explorations into the murky world of soup. Though diet guides often recommend starting a meal with a light soup to help reduce overall calorie consumption while still feeling sated, Dr. Wansik has found that this is not always the case. As it turns out, size matters: it all comes down to the dish in which the soup is served.

Dr. Wansik found that people who were given a secret “bottomless bowl” ate 75% more soup than those eating from standard bowls. Our appetites are dependent upon visual cues, such as how much food is left in the dish, rather than on how full we actually feel.

Read More

Latest Posts