Weekly Link Love — Edition 90

Research of the Week

Animal protein beats plant protein for seniors who want to retain strength and daily functionality.

Workouts make music sound better.

Mineral water rich in magnesium sulfate can help against constipation.

Kids and teens with depression should definitely be exercising.

Low-dose alcohol is beneficial for mice.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

Episode 434: Brett Lloyd: Host Elle Russ chats with Brett Lloyd, a carnivore coach who fixed a ton of health issues by going meat-only.

Primal Health Coach Radio, Episode 69: Laura and Erin chat with Dr. Stephen Cabral about how genes are not your destiny.

Media, Schmedia

This is rather tragic. Are we heading in this direction?

South Africa bans alcohol to reduce alcohol-related hospitalizations and free up space for COVID-19 patients.

Interesting Blog Posts

Smaller farms, more biodiversity.

A Navy SEAL’s take on MovNat.

Social Notes

Friendship.

Everything Else

See? Pork heals.

The changing role of livestock in agriculture.

It’s not just sugar.

Things I’m Up to and Interested In

Phrase I liked: “Feral grapevines.”

Interesting important article: Have we been thinking about pain all wrong?

Sad to see: The rise of “broken heart” syndrome.

A topic that’s endlessly fascinating: What happens right before and after you die?

Scenario I’m imagining: Crafting and relying on bone tools for basic daily life.

Good news: It’s much harder to catch the coronavirus from inanimate objects than previously thought. And in gyms.

Question I’m Asking

Read that article on Korean loneliness culture. Do you think that’ll be the trend for the rest of the world?

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Jul 11 – Jul 17)

Comment of the Week

“The guy I buy my beef from has cattle that live their entire life on his ranch, and eat only grass and hay except for some silage in winter that he also grows organically on his ranch. He plays music for his cattle in the barn, and when he takes them to slaughter takes them two at a time in his trailer, playing the same music as in the barn. When he arrives at the small processor, he drops his cattle himself as he’d never entrust that to anyone else.
I buy a quarter of a cow for about $900, or I think about $8.50 a pound.
Small processors abound and more and more of us are seeking them out.
We grow many of our own vegetables and everything else we buy local whenever possible. I have a masticating juicer and drink intense amounts of greens, of course along with my well-designed supplement regimen.
At age 69 I have been low carb for almost 23 years and keto for almost 3 years. Yesterday morning I did a 41 mile road bike ride in Colorado where I live, fully fasting. I hadn’t eaten for 16 hours at the start of the ride, and averaged 16.5 computer average speed, riding alone in heavy breezes.
I don’t even think about food on rides. Even at 10% bodyfat I have plenty of fat to burn.
Keto rocks.”

Greg’s doing things right.

About the Author

Mark Sisson is the founder of Mark’s Daily Apple, godfather to the Primal food and lifestyle movement, and the New York Times bestselling author of The Keto Reset Diet. His latest book is Keto for Life, where he discusses how he combines the keto diet with a Primal lifestyle for optimal health and longevity. Mark is the author of numerous other books as well, including The Primal Blueprint, which was credited with turbocharging the growth of the primal/paleo movement back in 2009. After spending three decades researching and educating folks on why food is the key component to achieving and maintaining optimal wellness, Mark launched Primal Kitchen, a real-food company that creates Primal/paleo, keto, and Whole30-friendly kitchen staples.

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39 thoughts on “Weekly Link Love — Edition 90”

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  1. It’s pretty easy to become overwhelmed in today’s world, particularly for people who struggle with self-esteem problems or various other handicapping issues. Society makes few allowances for people who don’t “measure up”, and it isn’t just happening in South Korea.
    I have a mildly disabled relative whom I’ve watched with a heavy heart over the years. He can’t make it in a high-tech world, and he knows it. He and many others like him have little option other than to opt out of a society where they aren’t wanted or needed.
    It’s human nature to seek the level at which one can live in peace. Often that can mean a life spent mostly alone. However, being alone isn’t the same thing as being lonely. Introverts have long been hassled and criticized for preferring their own company to that of other people. The same is likely true of those who deliberately opt out of a situation they can’t cope with.

  2. I tried to access the Brett Lloyd podcast, but the Jon Venus podcast from last week came up.

  3. I’ve never been truly depressed before, so I have no idea what its like. But I have known people in the past that cannot even bring themselves TO exercise. Almost like they need to be dragged out of their dark bedroom and thrust out onto the sidewalk for a walk around the block. But I do agree 100% that any funk I’ve been in or self esteem issues or lumpy attitude is directly correlated with a lack of exercise phase.

    The endorphins immediately after a workout are such a great high. They don’t last forever but over time fat gets lost, muscles builds, movement is easier and the newly fortified confidence and self-esteem truly do lift you up. I would equate the feeling with Steve Martin in The Jerk when he finally gets to see his name in the phone book.

      1. Well, yeah I’ve been depressed. But not long-term, crippling, this-is-never-gonna-get-better depression. I think it’s different for everyone.

  4. I don’t think you’ll be out of a job based on that app Mark. I find your posts very insightful.
    On feelings – I agree that it’s wrong to invalidate the emotions of others, and oneself. Emotions are there to show what is needed and we need to listen to them.
    Many thanks – have a good Sunday.

  5. That stuff about feelings (Sunday with Sisson) is some of your best ever.

  6. I have told my children and some of their friends if you have extreme romantic feelings about someone but everyone around you is telling you that person is a terrible person, listen to them. This advice probably would not be taken but a mom’s gotta try.

    1. It is unfortunate that I didn’t listen to those comments years ago. Maybe if you ask questions to make the person think and reflect, it would have a better chance at making them realise it’s not a healthy relationship.

  7. Yes, my name is really KAREN. And for the first time in my almost 60 years of life I truly feel bewildered. I have always tried to see the bright side of everything and everyone and I believe I’ve been pretty good with that. And I have chose to be accepting of every persons choices they make in their lives. After all, it is their life to live, not mine to tell them how.
    Why is there so much negativity now? What happened to our excitement about being alive and wanting to work hard to accomplish great things for ourselves, our families and our communities and our county?
    Mark, please share more pearls of wisdom as you did today about emotion. Reading those words this morning was very refreshing. Thanks!!!!

  8. Emotions are physical. They are our bodies way of helping us stay alive and healthy. Ex: anger tells us that someone is trying to mess with us. Joy tells us we are doing something good for us.

  9. I’m going to take it easy on the neural net tool and only print one of the less absurd replies I got:

    for “arctic” the tweetout was: “Antarctica is the only known land on which you can sail south in the morning and in the afternoon be sailing north.”

    You should try some of the other words I used: vegan, soviet, segregation, shinto, kava

    I seem to have guessed their weaknesses.

  10. Re: Cold hard facts don’t matter, and reality is relative (Sunday w/ Sisson).

    Dale Carnegie’s brilliant book How to Win Friends & Influence People convinced me of this. It also proves to me that there is nothing new under the sun, we humanoids have always been the same.

    Positive reinforcement & bridging your own POV with others is hands down more effective persuasion than logical appeals or pugnaciousness.

  11. Re Sunday with Sission – July 19, 2020

    You totally nailed the piece on feelings. I hate it when people tell me I shouldn’t feel the way I’m feeling, and exactly as you say, logic has nothing to do with what I’m feeling.

    What I would add is that reflection can help us understand how and why we came to be feeling that feeling, and in some cases help us learn to avoid that feeling in the future. But sometimes, like with grief, you just gotta feel it, and the only thing you can do to support someone in those times is hold their hand.

  12. One of my besties was just ‘dumped’ by his boyfriend. He has prostate cancer and is about to go into treatment, he cares for his disabled elderly dad and is out of work due to the Covid thing. Feelings. I have many of them and he is having a TON of them. I keep telling him to roll with it. They, feelings, are real, and we have to accept them, then deal with them. Thank you for sharing this today. Stopped me from crying about his situation for a moment.

  13. I found this post fun and interesting! I did try the link though – the one with “word” and several of your customized ones – none would go through – the link was “protected”, basically broken. FYI. Anyway, loved how some of your choices were interpreted!

  14. I immediately posted your emotions piece on Facebook (with credit, of course!). It resonated with me and felt others might benefit from it, too. Thanks Mark! I look forward to your Sunday emails!

  15. Hi Mark! Love your columns. On the subject of emotions, I agree to a point. Having recently lost my husband, I found/find myself offended when someone, anyone tells me how I feel. More importantly, I find it offensive when they say: “Don’t worry, it’s going to get ‘better’.” How ignorant. How can life without my best friend and partner in life possibly get better? That said, the reason I am still standing is because my parents taught me that though emotions are real – you don’t have to be ruled by them. This is the biggest problem I see with generations that followed mine. Emotions have to be tempered with reason and logic and critical thinking skills. We have generations who think that every emotion requires a safe space, crying room, puppy, or public tantrum space to be expressed. I believe that’s one of the reasons we have the current chaos going on. Learning young to deal with emotions; how to handle them, which ones are valid of a good cry or a foot stomp and what to do with those feelings that doesn’t hurt yourself or others is blatantly missing in our world. I could curl up in a ball and die from how much I miss my husband, but should I give in to that? That’s what my emotions tell me to do. Instead, I acknowledge those feelings, wish they didn’t exist, and get out of bed (most days), and try to finding meaning in why I’m still here. The worse I feel, the more productive I try to be – maybe it’s cleaning out a closet, finding a friend who needs help with something, or starting a project – small or large. Today is a bad day, but I’m up. I’m watching a favorite episode of GOT’s that my husband and I loved. I’m drinking coffee and telling myself I need to get outside for some sunlight and a walk. I hope giving in to my emotions don’t prevent me from doing that. Reason and logic tells me it’s a better choice.

    1. Kim, I’m so sorry for the loss of your beloved husband. I admire the way you’re dealing with it. My sympathies.

  16. By marginalizing my reason and logic with fact-free emotion, I feel invalidated and hurt.

    Actually, I don’t care. But we’ve had to endure the destruction of society the last few months while being endlessly hectored. Hurting feelings isn’t really on the top of my concern list right now.

  17. The emotion piece I can relate to, it’s law of attraction at its finest really. Same goes for online dating, most profiles tell you who they “feel” they are, not necessarily actual, not a lie or twisting of reality, more an illusion. In some cases maybe delusion? Lol

  18. Mark, I read your Sunday with Sisson email. I’d rather read your writing than a bot’s any day! I’ve been to hundreds of health-related blogs and yours is by far my favorite one to read. I started reading your blog almost 10 years ago when I was in high school and you were the one that convinced me to follow the primal lifestyle. I feel so much better when I strictly follow this diet and lifestyle and I’m never going to go back to my whole grain-loving days. I have so much more energy and never feel tired anymore. Before I started doing this I’d need to take a nap every day just to feel normal! Also I LOVE your Primal Kitchen condiments! I could literally drink your ketchup, haha! Thanks for making this world better for me, and so many others! ?

  19. I really enjoyed your Sunday post this week. It was a great reminder for a mother to acknowledge and honour the feelings of her teenage son, who, like many other teenagers are experiencing a strange new isolated world. I heard someone call them the lost generation the other day. I bloody hope not. But again, thank you. I do enjoy your Sunday emails.

  20. Mark, I’ve been reading your stuff forever and this is the first time I’ve been moved to comment. I enjoyed learning the neural net tweets, but I really wanted to speak to the emotions piece. I’ve been thinking and writing about this for quite some time, and I completely agree with you. I spent years trying to logic away my own feelings because I didn’t think they were justified. But the truth is that feelings are a real response to an experience and fighting them only leads to unhealthy repression. Moving through them, poking them a bit, interrogating them and feeling them helps you validate your experience and, by extension, yourself.

  21. Access denied in the thoughts.sushant-kumar.com/word Neural Network app.

  22. I was unable to access thoughts.sushant-kumar.com. Disappointing.

  23. Well, based on the samples you gave above, I would say you job is quite safe. Blogs generated by some kind of AR is about as reliable as writing your question on a public chalkboard and coming back later to see if someone put an answer down.

  24. Mark, dont ever think your comments can be replaced by a computer-generated one. The artificial ones may be clever or even amusing but computers dont have the capacity to feel or care about people like you do. You are a big hero to me and I hope you never stop trying to guide people to health and joy of life.

  25. Thanks Mark for all you have done with your site. I have been following since around 2009 and have really enjoyed your approach and knowledge sharing. I like the article on feelings with a teenaged daughter, find everything you stated to be very true. I hope you and your family are well if you are still in the Miami area. Thanks again for changing my outlook on. Nutrition and always giving me something to think about. Also if you happen to have the old school primal blueprint poster That I could get signed, I would happily make a donation to your favorite charity. Would love to frame it and hang it in my office.

  26. Loved the “successful business and carbs” and “MegaDose of Natural Calm” comments.

    Great advice on feelings. This is a great reminder to be compassionate.

    Thanks!

  27. “Stop invalidating people’s emotions.” – Yes, absolutely, I agree.
    “This is one area where “cold hard facts” don’t matter. ” – What, then, should be our response to fear, either our own or other’s? Fear so often leads to hate and/or a restriction of freedom – either self-imposed or imposed on others or imposed by others.
    If facts and reason are not the antidote to fear, what is?

  28. Mark, please don’t stop writing! I don’t believe an autogenerator could ever do a respectable job replacing a human brain, especially yours. Your voice is one I continually look to for wisdom, truth, expertise, and a grounded dose of reality. Thank you for forging forward for all of our sake!

  29. I think America and potentially other places are already full of people like those loners in Korea, even before corona. We have fairly low levels of stigma surrounding lifestyle choices here. In my opinion it is newsworthy in Korea merely as an artifact of the formation of a labeled tribe to legitimize their choices.

  30. The content you have shared on this blog is awesome, the images inside are also awesome. In the coming future, please share more for everyone to refer to. Thank you very much