Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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October 15 2017

Weekend Link Love — Edition 473

By Mark Sisson
12 Comments

weekend_linklove in-lineResearch of the Week

Magic mushrooms reset the brains of depressed patients.

Broccoli improves leaky gut.

“High levels of NQ [Neanderthal quotient, or the amount of Neanderthal genetic introgression a person has] tend to correspond to social fear, autistic tendencies, and depressive tendencies.”

Easter Islanders likely reached South America before Europeans.

A nice paper summarizing how and why modern people have lost their metabolic flexibility.

Dietary potassium is a big determinant of arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

Episode 190: Lynne McTaggart: Host Elle Russ chats with Lynne McTaggart, one of the most influential figures in the consciousness and spirituality movements.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

Interesting Blog Posts

I don’t know about anyone else, but I still consider coffee to be a mystical sacrament.

Roundup is killing soil bacteria.

Media, Schmedia

Beef is looking better than ever.

Everything Else

Baltimore Ravens running back Alex Collins uses Irish dancing to improve his footwork on the field.

Sorry, vegans: Those lentils you love so much are the engines of social inequality.

Another example of human and dog co-evolution.

Things I’m Up to and Interested In

Study that doesn’t surprise me: Replacing saturated fat with monounsaturated fat or carbohydrate fails to improve inflammatory or atherosclerotic markers, and in the case of carbohydrate worsens them.

I’m glad: Gene therapy for blindness appears to work well.

An excellent offer that I hope people accept: Erwan Le Corre offers to train and certify all U.S. PE teachers who want to learn the MovNat method. Just imagine the quality of our athletes (and everyone else) in twenty years’ time.

Article I found interesting: What are the evolutionary explanations for female infidelity?

If you miss PrimalCon (so do I), you’ll love: Bee-Fest, a glamping wellness retreat in the Northern California redwoods led by former PrimalCon presenters Adam and Vanessa Lambert of Bee the Wellness. Use code PRIMAL at checkout for 10% off.

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Oct 15 – Oct 21)

Comment of the Week

The Ministry of Silly Walks strikes again, with the mid-foot, of course.

– I can’t ignore a Monty Python reference, His Dudeness.

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12 thoughts on “Weekend Link Love — Edition 473”

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  1. I’ve eaten so much broccoli that I can’t believe it. I’ve been steaming it almost daily since the early 90s.

    1. Me too Bob, I sometime wonder if I eat TOO much broccoli LOL. There is conflicting information out there if the thiocyanates affect the thyroid or not. – George

  2. The chicken article was a great reminder of why I buy pastured chicken (and eggs) from a local farmer. The taste is completely different and spoils you for regular chicken from the grocery store. Especially when you are doing something simple like just roasting it. And yes, totally agree…in my mind coffee is still a mystical sacrament. My morning coffee time, journal in hand, is one of my favorite parts of the day:)

  3. When I look up top food sources of potassium the list includes fish (I do eat clean sources of salmon and sardines) but the rest of the list does not look very primal … beans, dried fruit, bananas, yogurt (I don’t do dairy but I guess butter etc is considered primal). I’m wondering if a primal diet is potassium deficient? Anyone feel free to “edumacate” me. 🙂

    1. Those things are all primal, if individually tolerated, and in one’s individual carb allowance, as are potatoes. Use nosalt for supplemental K.

    2. Good point; based on Cronometer it is, whether I use the Paleo model or various keto models, so I started to supplement with 1/8 tsp (0.7 grams) of potassium chloride powder, as I can’t eat potatoes and if I do eat bananas, they are mostly green…. However, one should be careful when supplementing if having kidney issues.

      The article on the rotisserie chicken in Paris, makes me want to hope on a Plane and rush over to sample it (only 5 hr away). Growing up, we had excess to free range chicken. Now, it’s all industrialized and tasteless, even thought hormone and antibiotic free (must be the food they’re getting) and at the asking price for truly organic, I’d rather eat red meat.

  4. Hmm. the article actually suggests that DNA tests on Easter Islanders bones (pre-Eurpoean arrival) indicate that they did NOT reach the mainland of South America. Which is surprising considering how far they’d traveled to reach the Island in the first place.

    Still, samples from just 5 individuals, and some uncertainty about where in the timeline from 1000 to 1722 they came from makes the finding less than difinitive.

  5. I love the carrot recipe. I eat carrots everyday, love them.

  6. Interesting article about female infidelity. Actually, there are probably dozens of reasons that are as diverse as women themselves. Whereas for men there’s usually only one reason..

  7. I’m predisposed to disagreeing with David Buss, and that holds true here as well. Mate-switching, as explained, does have its merit, and it doesn’t seem wrong as such.

    One of my problems with the article is that he doesn’t mention cooperative breeding. Also, Buss writes as if life partner and sexual encounter are the same thing and calls it mate. Thence, he doesn’t account for the influence of tribal living with tribal provisioning on promiscuity.

    How about this instead: Humans (women also) come with evolved tendencies for falling in love and for aprreciation of sex and novelty (also wrt. partners). When they’re in an envionment where they can safely allow themselves to indulge in the expression of these tendencies, they might. That also explains swingers better.

  8. A nice paper summarizing … metabolic flexibility: The abstract is like something out of Primal Blueprint. And the two diagrams are very informative, a different perspective on primal versus modern life.

  9. I am disappointed that you promote Lynne McTaggart I was just saying to someone that I trust this website because it is so science-based.