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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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July 30 2017

Weekend Link Love – Edition 462

By Mark Sisson
20 Comments

weekend_linklove in-lineRESEARCH OF THE WEEK

The sperm count in men from North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand has declined by 50% over the last 40 years.

Sperm quality is down in dogs, too.

Birthday wishes do come true, as long as you wish to increase the cake’s bacterial levels by 1500%.

Another study shows that wearing blue blocking goggles at night boosts melatonin levels, even when you use your smartphone.

Watching TV for a few hours a week might not be so bad (and may even be good) for a kid’s brain development as long as they watch and discuss it with a caretaker.

Hip thrusts are great but don’t seem to increase sprint performance.

Turns out the Canaanites weren’t killed off.

High brain iron may precipitate Alzheimer’s.

NEW PRIMAL BLUEPRINT PODCASTS

Episode 179: Thor Conklin: Host Elle Russ chats with Thor Conklin, an entrepreneur who credits his healthy paleo lifestyle as a critical co-factor in his success.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

INTERESTING BLOG POSTS

How to lower your cholesterol, if you’re into that sort of thing.

This isn’t fake news.

MEDIA, SCHMEDIA

Why Wim Hof explicitly cautions against doing his breathing techniques in or around water.

Homo erectus may have displayed human-like thinking at least 1.8 million years ago.

EVERYTHING ELSE

The overwhelming importance of conscientiousness.

DNA evidence is changing everything we thought we knew about plant and animal domestication.

How is the poke craze affecting yellowfin populations?

The first human embryos were just edited in the US using CRISPR.

It’s always nice to see a success story.

THINGS I’M UP TO AND INTERESTED IN

Nice take on the AHA/coconut oil controversy: From Nina Teicholz.

I hope they used avocado oil: Bob Dylan potato chips are all the rage in China.

I would have liked this guy: Japanese longevity expert who recently died at 105 had great advice for long life.

I’m glad I never got into playing football: 110/111 NFL brains were found to have evidence of CTE, the neurodegenerative disease caused by trauma.

I just did the same thing last week: Man thinks cubed butternut squash is cubed cheese, tries to return it.

RECIPE CORNER

TIME CAPSULE

One year ago (Jul 30– Aug 5)

COMMENT OF THE WEEK

Good stuff as always Mark I just beg you to never publish a link to an article that states eating a couple of bites of 85% chocolate every day is bad for me. ?

– Even if such a study were to come out, I’d suppress the findings with every ounce of my being, HealthyHombre.

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20 thoughts on “Weekend Link Love – Edition 462”

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  1. It will be interesting to see how the football/CTE link plays out over time. My stats prof noted that it takes about two decades for important information to get out to the public. In the case of football, so many dollars are attached to its existence that the simple truth that it’s probably dangerous to play might take a longer time to reach people. (I intuitively knew this at age 5 or so, recognizing that getting bashed was not something I wanted.) My best guess is that over the next decade or so wealthy communities (with more avenues to financial success in the form or career and college scholarships) will abandon football, and players will increasingly be drawn from impoverished communities.

    My other prediction is that there will be frantic efforts to show that new headgear prevents CTE, and some will be swayed by this. However, the most startling aspect of the research was that lineman, receiving persistent, low-level hits, appeared to be as vulnerable as those getting hit hard (like receivers), so I have doubts that CTE rates will decrease.

  2. Taking shoes off and running around barefoot is great. Good for the kid. What I object to is cutting off foreskins and running numbed for life. Bad for the kid.

  3. Dave Feldman’s work on dietary changes in cholesterol is the elephant in the (exam) room.

  4. As one who is very high in creativity and very low in conscientiousness I can agree the fallout is lifelong. Creative people break rules and tradition and expectations and that irritates everyone. Details are chains that bind, procedures are locked boxes… a planned vacation isn’t one. In time it also can lead to you not giving a damn what other people think because they are only repeated what creative people thought first, did first, or made first. Living echo cambers. Better to be creative and alone than trapped in a crowd of very conscientious followers. That is the living dead.

    1. That is so true. Brilliant people break the rules because rules are made for average results, and who wants average?

    2. You’re right when you say “creative” people irritate everyone. I know several self-described creatives and they are generally flaky and unreliable. And because they try to reject rules even to the point of disregarding the laws of cause-and-effect they never end up actually creating anything because they have no follow-through.
      Brunel was a creative genius but he was an engineer who followed the rules of physics and look at what he created.

  5. There’s a great documentary called “the Disappearing Male” that came out years ago… they reported the same finding regarding sperm count. In part, this is why our tribe doesn’t wear petro chemicals (synthetic fabrics), nor eat nor drink from plastics, and avoid wifi, xeno and phyto estrogens and other non-native toxicants. The list goes on and on and on…

    Oh yeah, under MEDIA, SCHMEDIA I think that you meant to type Wim Hof though Wif Hof may be another person all together 🙂

    1. The sperm count has also fallen almost perfectly in line with the rise of feminism – could the two be related ?

      I also heard that basically our whole water system is polluted with estrogen hormones due to the rise of the use of the pill – basically the user are peeing out high levels of these excess hormones in to the system, which finds its way back to drinking water.

      1. Mark, I object to this user’s comment and respectfully ask you to moderate it. “tribal” is blaming women for men’s health problems. That’s ridiculous and offensive to your female primal community.

        1. Paula, I understand your concern. I prefer to encourage discussion and reasonable disagreement whenever possible. Personally, I can say that I believe there’s ample evidence that the changes we’re seeing are rooted to increasing toxin exposure.

          1. Mark, I do not believe that “The sperm count has also fallen almost perfectly in line with the rise of feminism – could the two be related ? ” falls into the line of ‘reasonable’ disagreement. I do not believe it is reasonable to blame women wanting to be treated as equal human beings as causing health problems for men. Again I respectfully ask you respect women and to moderate this user.

          2. Paula, Mark’s article from 8/14 went further into this. Unfortunately instead of moderating Tribal’s comments he again ignored the main fault in Tribal’s comment about blaming feminism, and instead quoted a later comment Tribal made again blaming birth control. I’m glad he (sort of) debunked the ridiculous theory, but find it rather appalling he gave Tribal the spotlight in order to answer it. The article could have been written without quoting a clear sexist.

      2. How does feminism relate to the pill? And the addition of hormones in ALL of our food, is that feminism too? The hormones in the water would not be specifically from women using birth control, there are PLENTY other sources of hormones too, including said food. Which if you are on a paleo website I am shocked you don’t already understand that. It’s true its ridiculous how much hormonal birth control is pushed on women, they are horrible for women and luckily there are better options out there. When they tried to make a hormonal birth control for men the studies were stopped when just five percent of men felt onset of depression. That happens to over fifty percent of women and doctors don’t seem to care. If there was more feminism maybe those doctors would care about women and not put them on hormonal birth control. If they won’t hurt men with it why hurt women with it? Oh because they don’t care. Blame the pharmaceutical industry and food industry for the supposed hormones in the water system… blaming feminism is just ridiculous.

  6. Wow, Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara was indeed an inspirational person. Note to self as I fall short of this ideal … a life of service to others seems to be key to happiness and a long life.

  7. Conscientiousness definitely seems like a lost art form, especially here in Canada. I am not sure if it is because of the times we live in, or the rapidly shift demographics here but its getting more and more rare these days for people to say “thank you” after holding open a door.

  8. I have totally jumped on the poke bandwagon lately…and I’ve been ordering mine with no rice, extra tuna. Feeling a little guilty now! And lol to Healthy Hombre’s comment about chocolate. If loving dark chocolate is wrong, I don’t want to be right!

  9. Mark thank you SO much for highlighting the story on Dr. Shigeaki. So many great little nuggets to remember not only about health but LIFE itself 🙂

  10. Much more worried about the huge amounts of sugar than a few extra bacteria on the birthday cake