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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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November 20 2011

Weekend Link Love – Edition 165

By Mark Sisson
33 Comments

“The fact is, unless you’re buying from a beekeeper, you’re at risk.” Most honey isn’t actually honey, a new test of commercial honey (or should that be “honey”?) has revealed.

Tweeting from the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, anthropologist John Hawks notes that “Great apes have no reduction of bone mineral density with aging in vertebral column.” I wonder if we’re actually destined to wither away after all.

A Colorado charter school has gone vegetarian. Parents, don’t trip over yourselves trying to submit your child’s application.

Last year, I linked to a Big Blue Test workout done by MDA reader Ryan to commemorate World Diabetes Day and show the power of exercise over blood sugar control. He’s back at it again. Go check it out.

From Julianne’s Paleo and Zone Nutrition Blog comes a handy (and let’s face it, rather dandy) guide to the omega-6 fatty acid content of various nuts, meats, fish, fats, and oils. It’s probably the best go-to resource on the subject I’ve seen.

Paleolithic cave paintings, with some informed speculation about the artists who painted them. I particularly like the first one of all the hand prints. Haunting.

Eurozone bans airport X-ray scanners (the same ones used in US airports) amid cancer concerns. So much for “totally harmless and safe,” eh?

Gobble. Gobble. Use promo code “turkeyday” at Primal Pacs this weekend and get free shipping.

For those of you having trouble making my “eating more vegetables” tips work, just eat some pizza and call it a day.

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Nov 15 – Nov 21)

Comment of the Week

I’m not a vegetarian because I love animals. I’m a vegetarian because I hate plants.

– The initial reaction of reader Dr. Biscuits to this week’s post on how to eat more vegetables. I like it.

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33 thoughts on “Weekend Link Love – Edition 165”

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  1. That artwork is pretty cook, and I’m in agreeance that the hands is kinda haunting.

  2. Thanksgiving stuff hushpuppies – sounds good. Or did you mean Primal Hushpuppies by Vibram? Eat a bunch of hushpuppies and then go walk them off? 🙂

  3. That initial quote about honey is pretty misleading, since the study found that all honey tested at health food stores and even Trader Joes were all real honey, with the correct amounts of pollen.

    1. i think the “real” meant not watered down, highly heated, ultra filtered and then in many cases chock full of chemicals and drugs (processed until it is no longer the natural substance any longer)… stone composite has “real” stone in it, but I would hardly call it “REAL” stone…

  4. I love the cave paintings!!! Creativity is such an important part of being alive!

  5. I love how Pizza is a vegetable now, despite the fact that tomatoes aren’t vegetables to begin with.

    1. Today I saw ads for Pizza Hut’s new Dinner Box: two pizzas, eight wings and five breadsticks (picture is plastered at PH’s website.) You can’t get any LESS primal than that!!

  6. For the love of Mike, honey. Is there anything these bastards won’t adulterate? My current remains from pre-primal are from Argentina or the US, crystallized anyway so out it goes.

    I don’t use much but will buy a jar at the farmers market (comb in and opaque like candle wax) just to support a local producer.

    1. dont forget, honey that crystalizes is still fine. just heat it gently until it becomes a liquid again…

  7. I’m a bit appalled at the vegetarian school, especially since they’re local to me here in Denver. I think I’m going to write a letter, need to get my talking points together… increased phytic acid intake, imbalanced omegas, lack of healthy protein sources necessary for developing children, the issues surrounding ammonia-washed meat. Any other suggestions?

    1. Assuming they jump on the soy bandwagon as well, you could talk about the dangers of soy (amongst which: causes hormone imbalances, high levels of phytoestrogens, is linked to neurotoxicity in developing brains via high levels of manganese, linked to increases in allergies, not to mention the huge pesticide/chemical load on the crops).

      And is the school banning junky things, such as “homemade” sugary treats like banana bread and cookies and muffins? Not only is eating meat so very necessary, especially for growing children, but making room in the diet for things like baked sweets (whilst brainwashing children into thinking those are healthy) and excluding meat would be very detrimental. Very unfair.

      Also… It looks as though the children at this school are aged 12 or under. It is unethical to decide something so very important for children who don’t know better. There are better topics the school could be addressing through food.

      Having said that, there’s nothing wrong with offering vegetarian meals from an environmental perspective.. so long as the children are not being told that eating meat is wrong, and so long as children can bring meat with them to school in addition to their vegetarian fare. One meal like that a day at school can be a good thing- it’s great to encourage vegetable consumption, provided the lunches aren’t encumbered with sugar and grains, and are instead full of whole foods, eggs, cheeses, and the like… but banning meat? Why not try to create an initiative with local farmers, to get local and organic, traditional pastured meats into the lunch regime instead? Teach the children about the power in their hands to choose the right things for their bodies and the earth, the value of respecting animals and showing them where good, clean food comes from, rather than telling them the most natural thing for them to eat is wrong.

      In the video I can see pre-packaged apple slices… there is an emphasis on beans and grains… lifeless, colourless romaine hearts. Again, I don’t know all of the specifics and the article in the link, as well as the accompanying video, does not give much information. But.. I can see some things very wrong with this, indeed.

      As we say in Albanian… Oj kuku..

      ** woops, sorry Mark for the double posting.

    2. I’m here in Denver too and yes, this is pretty disturbing. It’s so Colorado too, ugh… In a letter I guess I would add that I commend their effort to provide kids with healthy foods and that it’s great that they recognize the problems with the lunches served in other schools, but that eliminating meat and offering… blah blah blah all the stuff you said.

      Hit me up on facebook if you’d like me to chime in on the letter.

  8. For anyone wanting to view and interesting doc on bees and honey. Check out, Vanishing of the bees. It touches base on how most of the honey is imported from China and is highly contaminated.

  9. That omega 6 chart was pretty interesting…I didn’t realize pork belly had that much omega 6. I live in South Korea and I eat it fairly often here, should I be concerned?

    I’m trying to clean up my diet but I often feel like my food options become more and more limited the more I read.

  10. So important to get real honey from LOCAL beekeepers for that allergy control, eh? We keep some in the cabinet.

    P.S. Julianne Taylor is awesome!

  11. Assuming they jump on the soy bandwagon as well, you could talk about the dangers of soy (amongst which: causes hormone imbalances, high levels of phytoestrogens, is linked to neurotoxicity in developing brains via high levels of manganese, linked to increases in allergies, not to mention the huge pesticide/chemical load on the crops).

    And is the school banning junky things, such as “homemade” sugary treats like banana bread and cookies and muffins? Not only is eating meat so very necessary, especially for growing children, but making room in the diet for things like baked sweets (whilst brainwashing children into thinking those are healthy) and excluding meat would be very detrimental. Very unfair.

    Also… It looks as though the children at this school are aged 12 or under. It is unethical to decide something so very important for children who don’t know better. There are better topics the school could be addressing through food.

    Having said that, there’s nothing wrong with offering vegetarian meals from an environmental perspective.. so long as the children are not being told that eating meat is wrong, and so long as children can bring meat with them to school in addition to their vegetarian fare. One meal like that a day at school can be a good thing- it’s great to encourage vegetable consumption, provided the lunches aren’t encumbered with sugar and grains, and are instead full of whole foods, eggs, cheeses, and the like… but banning meat? Why not try to create an initiative with local farmers, to get local and organic, traditional pastured meats into the lunch regime instead? Teach the children about the power in their hands to choose the right things for their bodies and the earth, the value of respecting animals and showing them where good, clean food comes from, rather than telling them the most natural thing for them to eat is wrong.

    In the video I can see pre-packaged apple slices… there is an emphasis on beans and grains… lifeless, colourless romaine hearts. Again, I don’t know all of the specifics and the article in the link, as well as the accompanying video, does not give much information. But.. I can see some things very wrong with this, indeed.

    As we say in Albanian… Oj kuku..

  12. I’ve ditched all sugar alltogether, I don’t go near honey, or maple syrup, and I don’t want to. But when I used to eat honey, my dad always brought home jars of black, thick, iron-rich buckwheat honey from his brother who lives in rural Caucasus and has a huge apiary/bee farm, with the cappings, propolis, and all the goodness in it. That’s real honey – murky, thick and almost buttery, with “marbling”, not watery syrup that’s no different from hfcs or whatever.

    I suppose they’ll be serving plenty of pizza at that school (its a vegetable now…I suppose it grows on stalks, like sunflowers.). Golden Carrot award, give me a break.

  13. And oh, that cave art gave me the shivers! Its so different just hearing and reading about paleolithic peoples is one thing, but to see a human hand imprint is another! WOW!

  14. The honey analysis report from FSN is pretty damning… Roughly 80% of the retail / industrial honey in the US is most probably some illegally imported chinese honey often contaminated with banned antibiotics or herbicides or heavy metals, laundered by having its pollen filtered out in order to hide its origin (denaturing it further). Thanks for the link !

    The report also details the uncooperativeness of the FDA… I think food safety is too important to be left in the hands of a monopoly of federal public servants, we need to bring them some competition.

  15. Julianne’s Paleo and Zone Nutrition Blog omega 6 chart is a great refrence. Thanks

  16. Say it isn’t so??? I love my honey and had no suspicion around what should be so pure. Unbelievable. Thank you for sharing this. I’ll be exceptionally choosy on-going. SMH in continued disappointment in our foul food supply.

  17. I don’t think it’s wise to get hung up on what the EU bans. Eurocrats usually operate at a 2-5 lightyears’ distance from reality. 🙂
    The airport scanner ban is most likely a purely populist move – Europe likes to distinguish itself by being “privacy-conscious” and “green” as opposed to Big Bad America. (Except when it costs significant money – just a few weeks ago they pulled the rug out from under their climate action plans.)