Tag: weekly link love

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 151

Research of the Week

Overfeeding carbohydrates reduces antioxidant status, more so in overweight people.

Eating more dairy reduces fractures and falls in the elderly.

Women and obese people may be more sensitive to disturbed neural responses after Splenda consumption.

Seems like a lot of things originated in the Eurasian steppes.

Time in nature is priceless.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 150

Research of the Week

Higher free PUFA in the blood, lower cognitive function.

London’s Black Cabbies have enlarged hippocampuses.

Low protein intakes make nighttime light exposure even more detrimental.

Essential oils show promise for improving mental health.

Those who laugh the most talking to a stranger enjoy the conversation least.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 149

Research of the Week

The people who need the vaccine most of all—the metabolically unhealthy—have the lowest antibody response to vaccination.

100% of Spanish breastfeeding women have elevated levels of acrylamide, a toxin caused by heating vegetable oils.

A high-soybean oil diet (sound familiar?) causes colitis in rodents.

Those who secrete the most insulin are more likely to lose more lean mass and less body fat during weight loss.

Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet imparts high enough ketones in the milk to prevent seizures in the nursing baby.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 148

Research of the Week

Compared to vegetable fat high in artificial trans-fatty acids (and a control diet), ruminant fat high in natural trans-fatty acids improves liver health, gut biome, and inflammatory status of lab rats.

Reasonable, accessible stack for COVID.

Selenium deficiency is implicated in viral myocarditis.

Energy compensation after exercise varies between individuals and may predict adiposity.

Too many omega-6 fats, increased risk of peripheral nerve pain.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 147

Research of the Week

Swearing makes you stronger.

The aging (and young, for that matter) brain needs social interactions.

Full-fat dairy wins again.

There is very little evidence in favor of “as low as possible” salt intakes, and yet that’s what most health authorities recommend.

Too many omega-6 fats, increased risk of peripheral nerve pain.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 146

Research of the Week

Each additional hour spent outdoors improves circadian health, mood, neuroticism, and almost everything.

An oregano oil molecule shows promise against COVID.

Hold off on retirement and see your cognitive skills persist.

Kids need trees.

A seed oil-based ketogenic diet is bad for brain volume in young mice.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 145

Research of the Week

The genetic basis for rhythm.

Tennis is linked to longevity. Playing, not watching.

Neanderthal and Denisovan blood groups.

A 5 day water-only fast improved metabolic biomarkers in adults.

There is such a thing as too much free time.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 142

Research of the Week

Only one type of human fat cell responds to insulin.

After mechanical loading (lifting heavy things), muscle cells tell fat cells to release fat.

Less sleep for new mothers, faster aging.

Metabolic rate doesn’t have to decline with age.

Obesity may increase virality.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 140

Research of the Week

Mussels remove microplastics from the water and poop them out.

Small amounts of alcohol may help make people with heart trouble healthier.

Reminder: there is no “junk” DNA.

Mice can willfully give themselves dopamine pulses. Can you?

More omega-3 in the blood, longer life.

Read More

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 139

Research of the Week

While processed meat intake was linked to worse cognitive health, unprocessed meat intake was linked to better cognitive health (although they didn’t emphasize that last part in the conclusion).

Babies born with higher levels of oxidized LDL in their cord blood have poorer pancreatic beta cell function.

For learning to read, handwriting is more effective than watching videos or typing.

Kefir is great for glycemic control.

Eating a diet high in fermented food increases microbial diversity in your gut and lowers inflammatory markers.

Read More

Latest Posts