Tag: weekly link love

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 125

Research of the Week
The earliest known modern humans in Europe were products of a recent coupling between humans and Neanderthals.

How your face and body morphology influence how threatening you appear to others.

Thru-hiking—at least as commonly practiced—can impair vascular health.

Personality and metabolism.

In rodents, early life sugar consumption impairs later life cognition, perhaps via changes to gut bacteria.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 124

Hey folks! You may have noticed something a little different this Friday. Weekly Link Love is now our New and Noteworthy series. We’re following the same format that a lot of you have been reading for over a decade now: it’s a collection of interesting reads I found around the Internet over the week. Enjoy!
Research of the Week
Our taste for fermented food goes back millions of years.

Eating less animal protein and more fiber is linked to 5x greater kidney stone recurrence.

Eating more magnesium and drinking more beer is linked to fewer kidney stones.

Unprocessed meat still appears to be safe to eat.

Glycine and NAC, together, are great for aging.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 123

Hey folks! You may have noticed something a little different this Friday. Weekly Link Love is now our New and Noteworthy series. We’re following the same format that a lot of you have been reading for over a decade now: it’s a collection of interesting reads I found around the Internet over the week. Enjoy!
Research of the Week
Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 without infection is enough to generate protective T-cell memory.

Dim light increases West Nile Virus exposure in chickens.

Some early Native Americans were coppersmiths.

Cows should eat a little seaweed every day.

The Southern European Atlantic diet traditional to North Western Spain and Northern Portugal is linked to reduced all-cause mortality. Who knew traditional diets were healthy?

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 122

Hey folks! You may have noticed something a little different this Friday. Weekly Link Love is now our New and Noteworthy series. We’re following the same format that a lot of you have been reading for over a decade now: it’s a collection of interesting reads I found around the Internet over the week. Enjoy!
Research of the Week
The interaction between alcohol sales, crime, and how long a baseball game goes after the 7th inning.

Spending money on your pet might make you happier than spending money on yourself.

CEO facial aging responds reliably well to market and business stressors.

Soybean oil causes changes to the microbiome that look atherogenic.

Strength training is enough to reduce liver fat, even without weight loss.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 121

Hey folks! You may have noticed something a little different this Friday. Weekly Link Love is now our New and Noteworthy series. We’re following the same format that a lot of you have been reading for over a decade now: it’s a collection of interesting reads I found around the Internet over the week. Enjoy!
Research of the Week
“Animal integration is another important tool for managing farms that improve regenerative outcomes. The most regenerative cropping operations observed in this set of studies always integrated livestock (chickens, sheep, or cattle), and these farms also had the greatest biodiversity, soil health, water infiltration rates, and economic metrics.”

Keto may help Covid patients.

Good overview of the health downsides of ingesting foods fried in seed oils.

Both fasting and low-carb reduce liver fat.

Eliminating dairy cows would barely move the climate while having severe impacts on nutrient availability. Pointless and harmful.

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 120

Research of the Week
Very low-carb ketogenic diets are safe and effective for type 2 diabetics.

Both Neanderthals and humans had similar auditory and speech capabilities.

The link between air pollution and crime.

2020 saw the highest number of traffic deaths in 13 years, despite driving being way down.

Improving road safety reduces crime.

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 119

Research of the Week
A large portion of COVID complications were due to metabolic co-morbidities.

You are mostly what you eat.

Keto improves daily function and quality of life in dementia patients.

Giving testosterone to men with type 2 diabetes causes remission in some.

Improving road safety reduces crime.

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 118

Research of the Week
Lower LDL, higher diabetes risk.

Vitamin D appears effective against Covid deaths.

Host selenium deficiency not only leaves you open to infections, it promotes the mutation of benign viruses into pathogenic ones.

Researchers were able to have conversations with dreamers during REM sleep.

“One hectare of a milpa comprising maize, common beans, and potatoes can provide the annual carbohydrate needs of more than 13 adults, enough protein for nearly 10 adults, and adequate supplies of many vitamins and minerals, according to the study.”

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 117

Research of the Week
Stories persuade more than facts.

Numeracy at age 4 predicts future math mastery.

Runner’s high depends on cannabinoids, not opioids.

Living near a street lamp may increase the risk of thyroid cancer. Rather specific, isn’t it?

Date seed tea increases T.

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Weekly Link Love — Edition 116

Research of the Week
More wine and cheese, less cognitive decline.

Kids born large for gestational age are at a higher risk for type 1 diabetes.

More climatic variation in the ancient world, higher-trust societies today.

In heart disease patients, LDL isn’t linked to cardiovascular or total mortality.

Drinking tea and coffee are protective.

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