Tag: weekly link love

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 140

Research of the Week

Mussels remove microplastics from the water and poop them out.

Small amounts of alcohol may help make people with heart trouble healthier.

Reminder: there is no “junk” DNA.

Mice can willfully give themselves dopamine pulses. Can you?

More omega-3 in the blood, longer life.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 139

Research of the Week

While processed meat intake was linked to worse cognitive health, unprocessed meat intake was linked to better cognitive health (although they didn’t emphasize that last part in the conclusion).

Babies born with higher levels of oxidized LDL in their cord blood have poorer pancreatic beta cell function.

For learning to read, handwriting is more effective than watching videos or typing.

Kefir is great for glycemic control.

Eating a diet high in fermented food increases microbial diversity in your gut and lowers inflammatory markers.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 138

Research of the Week

Older dancers have superior gait and balance. Great way for seniors to “train.”

Having elevated blood sugar levels “reprogram” your stem cells to increase your risk of atherosclerosis.

A piece of chocolate for breakfast is better for fighting jet lag than the same piece of chocolate at night.

Muscle relaxants don’t work that well and confer a risk of side effects.

Animal protein beats plant protein.

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New and Noteworthy—What I Read This Week: Edition 137

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Research of the Week
Going meatless barely reduces carbon footprint, and that’s assuming all the meat eaten is conventionally raised in feedlots.

A high-fat, low-carb, high-protein diet with 2 days of fasting per week was safe for patients with brain cancer.

According to the labels, plant-based “meat” is the same as beef, but when you look more closely…

The genetic architecture of COVID susceptibility.

Animal protein beats plant protein.

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New and Noteworthy—What I Read This Week: Edition 136

Research of the Week
Fasting insulin levels predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, even in the absence of diabetes.

More magnesium, less hostility.

MCT oil improves cognitive function in elderly subjects.

Keto mice drink less alcohol.

The anti-epileptic potential of melatonin.

COVID changed brains even in those who weren’t infected.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 135

Research of the Week
Extraversion is linked to more happiness than being agreeable.

More testosterone, views more discordant with the majority.

Barefoot walking is easier on the knees in people with osteoarthritis.

For lowering uric acid, a high protein diet beats a high unsaturated fat or high carb diet.

Low-carb diets reduce LDL particle number and increase particle size.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 134

Research of the Week
OLED is a little better than LED for circadian rhythms, but not by much.

Obesity drove the pandemic.

Some gut bacteria metabolize cholesterol.

Plant “milk” leads to iodine deficiency. Cow milk leads to sufficiency.

Men are more likely to make extreme decisions and changes than women.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 133

Research of the Week
In the absence of weight loss, there is no difference in blood glucose whether you’re getting 10% or 30% of dietary energy from carbs. In the study, 10% meant 65 grams of carbs per day or more.

Female chimps prioritize protein. Do you?

A survey of natural sounds, their benefits, and their distribution throughout National Parks.

In obese men, going keto preserves pancreatic beta-cell function and increases testosterone levels.

A genetic variant common among Southeast Asians may explain their low rates of COVID.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 132

Research of the Week
What accounts for the differences in alcohol consumption outcomes?

Dogs may detect COVID-19.

Autonomic imbalances in American football players.

Tsimane hunter-gatherers have brains that age more slowly.

Eat asparagus with your steak and red wine.

Doesn’t matter when or how: just get your steps in.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 131

Research of the Week
Another study confirming that selenium status is a strong factor in COVID severity.

“Dietary saturated fats seem to be less harmful than the proposed alternatives.”

Can parents with differing views on veganism compromise when feeding their kids?

The pandemic running boom. Who’s running and why?

Where does the lead hypothesis stand?

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