Tag: recent articles

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 192

Research of the Week

More ultra-processed food, more colorectal cancer.

More fasting insulin, higher mortality.

Better glucose control, better cognitive function (in adolescent type 1 diabetics).

Low-salt diets promote osteoporosis.

Omega-3s help older adults gain more muscle strength.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 191

Research of the Week

To avoid diabetes, South Asians should reduce carbohydrates and increase protein.

“Uncomfortable knowledge” is important knowledge.

Is coagulation more important than LDL in heart disease?

Playing in microbial-rich soil produces an anti-inflammatory, more diverse microbiome and stronger immune system.

Trigger warnings don’t work.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 190

Research of the Week

Hypothyroid predisposes people to severe COVID.

More steps, less death.

Genetic links to economic outcomes.

Medieval friars were riddled with parasites, probably from fertilizing their fields with their own manure.

To allow speech, the human larynx lost complexity compared to other primates’.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 189

Research of the Week

Macronutrients and genes interact to regulate obesity risk.

The most distinguishing feature of long COVID is low cortisol.

Even rainwater has “forever chemicals.”

Placebo is everywhere.

Women on vegetarian diets have a higher risk of hip fractures.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 187

Research of the Week

Famine and pathogens may have driven lactase persistence Europe.

Being bombed is bad for kids’ mental health.

Poor countries with cheap meat produce great soccer players.

Alcohol consumption is malleable (and contagious).

Neuroinflammation and Parkinson’s disease.

Ultraprocessed food and cognitive function.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 186

Research of the Week

The serotonin theory of depression is on shaky ground (again).

Eating dairy reduces fracture risk in elderly people.

Latvia, Russia, and South Asia have the most belief in luck and precognition; Protestant Europe the least.

For true COVID recovery, look to the gut.

Save the date for HIIT.

Rapidly increasing vitamin D status for controlling sepsis, infection, immune function.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 185

Research of the Week

Eating more protein during weight loss improves diet quality and helps retain lean mass.

Less microbial diversity, more severe COVID.

Cardamom for insulin resistance.

More saturated animal fat, fewer non-communicable diseases.

Japanese pickle consumption linked to lower blood pressure.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 184

Research of the Week

The Western world is lagging on unprocessed meat intake.

Keto helps patients with severe mental illness who don’t respond to other treatments.

Differing effects on overall mortality among COVID vaccines.

Natural immunity still works.

At least in England and Wales, extreme cold was more responsible for excess deaths than extreme heat.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 183

Research of the Week

Microdosing may improve mental health.

Maize consumption and cannibalism.

After a concussion, it’s probably smart to limit screen time.

How’s your “Darwinian fitness indicator,” men?

Complex dietary shifts in ancient Serbia triggered by the Neolithic.

High-fat Med diet beats low-fat diet. Every time.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 182

Research of the Week

Jordanians had domesticated olives at least 7000 years ago.

Lager may promote healthier gut biomes.

What do we know about the risks of zoonotic diseases and different livestock husbandry systems? Not enough, not yet.

If you want kids to get enough iodine—and you do want that, trust me—their intake of fish, meat, eggs, and dairy are the most crucial to get right.

Neanderthal genes concerning metabolism and immune function persist in some humans.

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