Tag: recent articles

New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 179

Research of the Week

Among patients with invasive breast cancer, metformin does not seem to help.

“Long COVID” doesn’t appear on any blood tests.

Resistance training and mortality.

Stonehengers ate cattle lung.

The gut regulates emotions in women.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 178

Research of the Week

Super high HDL levels linked to cardiac events in people with heart disease.

Regulating “eating cues” can help people lose weight.

Alcohol-related deaths are way up.

Just a small amount of physical activity lowers depression risk.

Nature always works.

Ketones may fight colorectal cancer.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 177

Research of the Week

Mask wearing, even at rest, appears to increase CO2 to excessive levels.

Eating more protein during weight loss staves off muscle loss and increases the overall quality of the diet.

In advanced stage kidney disease patients, a very low protein diet offers no benefit.

Vitamin B12 deficiency is disastrous for babies (and everyone).

More strength, less depression.

The more species you see at the coast, the better you feel.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 176

Research of the Week

Ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes—pathology and treatment options.

Feeding dogs once a day linked to healthier dogs.

Surgeon skill matters.

Mesolithic inhabitants of the Baltic region got around, ranged far from home.

Early farmers got shorter.

The rise of dairy in the steppe.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 175

Research of the Week

Evolutionary trajectories of various traits in different European populations over the millennia.

A ketone body suppresses colorectal cancer.

Sunlight, strength training, and seafood are a powerful combo.

Beautifying filters and hireability.

Remote learning decreased learning.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 174

Research of the Week

Less meat, more anxiety.

Breathing right is anti-viral.

Time restricted feeding increases locomotion.

BMI and mortality in the elderly.

Population and dietary changes in ancient Sicily.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 173

Research of the Week

Blood donation lowers PFAS levels.

Psilocybin may alleviate depression by increasing global integration in the brain.

TRT improves heart disease risk in type 2 diabetics without affecting classic risk factors.

Television promotes consumption.

Gut bacteria patterns can predict long COVID.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 172

Research of the Week

MCT oil helps seniors with Alzheimer’s disease.

Chocolate also helps seniors with memory.

The smell of putrescine (smell of death) may confer greater life satisfaction (makes you love life) on those smelling it.

Oxidized linoleic acid promotes colorectal cancer.

Wearing many common types of face masks causes you to breathe in microplastics.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 171

Research of the Week

Keto and protein restriction are not quite the same.

The reduction in heart disease associated with light to moderate drinking may be caused by other lifestyle factors that accompany drinking—not the alcohol itself.

More riboflavin, longer telomeres.

Divorce has a much more detrimental effect on children’s educational attainment than parental death.

GlyNAC improves aging biomarkers in humans (and extends lifespan in rodents).

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 170

Research of the Week

Artificial sweeteners have faint links to increased cancer risks.

COVID seems to increase the risk of diabetes.

Africans were eating olives 100,000 years ago (at least).

In middle adulthood, raising HDL and lowering blood sugar seems to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s. Now, how does one do that?

Minerals are important but balance is vital.

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