Tag: Hype

“Lunchtime Lipo”

Simple observation: As cosmetic procedures grow in both popularity and efficacy the number of people that look fit but are in fact unhealthy will rise. This is a version of the skinny-fat phenomenon. The day when chiseled abs and calves of steel are no longer fair measures of fitness is upon us. This LA Times article got me all riled up this week:
COME in on your lunch hour, have a few injections and melt away those stubborn bulges of fat. That promise has made injection lipolysis — also called lipodissolve and mesotherapy — one of the fastest-growing cosmetic procedures in the country, with centers sprouting up almost as fast as Starbucks stores. Nevermind that neither the procedure nor the drug cocktail used has FDA approval. Nevermind that Kansas and Nebraska are trying to ban the procedure. Nevermind that the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery do not condone the procedure. Nevermind that the procedure has been banned in Brazil, Canada and England.

People want a better body now.

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The Fountain of Youth, Coming to a Drug Near You

The anti-aging drug movement is upon us.

News reports out today inform us that Sirtris, a drug based upon the antioxidant resveratrol (found in red wine), will enter human drug trials as soon as next year. Aging – and so-called diseases of aging – is thought to be caused by cellular breakdown. And fundamental to the proper operation of a cell are the mitochondria. These “engines” of our cells are the key to disease prevention and longevity. From the article – which brings out the glamorous “Lance Armstrong has more powerful cells” example, naturally – we learn about the future of aging pharmaceuticals:

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New Nutrition Labeling System Still Has Flaws

New nutrition labels are in the works for a 2008 unveiling. There are some terrific improvements over the current labels. A particular problem I’ve long had with the existing labels is that the numbers are based upon the assumption that you’re following a 2,000 calorie-per-day diet. That’s too much for many women, not enough for many men, and irrelevant for many growing kids. And yet nearly every food and food product in America is measured and judged as if we were all virtually identical and weighing in at 150 pounds. Who actually takes time to adjust the nutritional values for their particular weight, BMI, and body fat percentage? Moreover, how many Americans are even aware that when they see “15% fat” on a label, the food carrying this label is not 15% fat? It seems, in fact, to be the perfect recipe for ambiguity – and obesity. If I wanted to obscure accurate nutrition information – because why would we ever want to present what’s inside on the outside – I’d come up with some imaginary standard and convoluted comparisons, too.

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The Burrito Diet, the Beverly Hills Diet, and the Only Diet on Earth That Actually Works

If it’s not a region – Sonoma, Hamptons, Mediterranean, South Beach, and the original locale diet, the Beverly Hills Diet – it’s a noun: Subway, Cabbage Soup, Cookie, and now the Chipotle Burrito Diet. That’s right. The latest diet is not just a single food, it’s got an adjectival spice to go with it. A man apparently lost 40 pounds in 3 months eating a single burrito daily. In terms of health, this has trouble all over it: too many calories in a serving, monotony and the consequences for metabolism, and far too many carbohydrates.

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Uno, Dos, Tres: 3 Health Products Debunked

There’s always some new product anxious to help you part with your hard-earned cash. Some products are healthy or helpful, but some are downright dishonest scams. These three have become popular of late. Don’t fall for the hype!

Oil pulling

Nonsensical and useless, the popularity of oil pulling persists. Through very particular “sieving” of an oil mixture in the mouth (think mouth rinse in slow motion), the oil supposedly draws toxins from the blood. If it were possible for oil to “pull” toxins out of the veins in the tongue, it would also be possible for oil to enter the bloodstream through your tongue. A molecule is a molecule. Toxins can’t “leak” out of your veins – if they could, you wouldn’t need to “pull” them out. Besides, even if toxins could “leak” from your veins, it would take far more than 15 or 20 minutes of “pulling” to cleanse your entire blood supply. Furthermore, fat-soluble toxins (the kind that would bind to oil) are not in the bloodstream. They are in your…fat cells! And on and on it goes. Read this terrific expose if you still think oil pulling is effective – it’s guaranteed to change your mind.

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Overpriced Running Shoes: Guess Which Brands

If you’re forking over extra cash for the high-end exercise kicks, save your money. Researchers performed a series of extensive tests with runners and discovered that the cheapest shoes offered by three top brands (they’re keeping mum on which ones – for now) were not only just as good as the priciest shoes, some of them were actually better! There was no appreciable difference in cushioning, support, quality or comfort. Not even pro runners could figure out the sneaker difference in a blind test.

Three brands…let’s take a guess, shall we?

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Surreptitious Soda Companies Still in Schools

Syruptitious?

Beverage giants like Coke and Pepsi Co. have come under heavy fire from children’s advocates, health experts and parents alike in recent years. Perhaps one of the most controversial issues in the soda wars is the “sponsorship” many schools obtain in exchange for stocking the hallways with vending machines. Exploiting our children in order to cover costs has to be one of the most disgusting examples of Big Agra’s power over our next generation’s health. So when Coke, Pepsi and Cadbury Schweppes announced they were pulling sugary beverages from schools in favor of “healthier” options like low-fat milk, diet drinks, and 100% juices, it was a begrudging step in the right direction. We don’t drink milk in our family and I’m not in favor of sports drinks, diet carbonated beverages or juice drinks, but at least this move was a measurable improvement over cans of corn syrup-clogged soda. (Bill Clinton lauded it as “courageous”.)

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The Oreo Pizza

The Oreo Pizza gives you an Oreo mustache. And that’s the selling point…

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Homeopathy: Can We Please, As a Society, Let This One Go?

You hear us rant almost daily about the ridiculous machinations of the modern medical establishment, namely the reliance on drugs and surgery to “fix” health issues that could often be better dealt with or eliminated with simple lifestyle changes. Modern medicine has become a bureaucratic, money-driven actuarial game wherein individual patient rights are routinely sacrificed for the greater good of large populations. And so you hear, “The operation was a success, but the patient died.” or, “We don’t care that you refuse to get vaccinated. You need to do it so the rest of us don’t die from an epidemic of this obscure disease.” Or “Despite debilitating side effects, this new drug appears to benefit 22% of patients who take it.”

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Food Fashionistas

McDonald’s breakfast burrito: ad vs. reality.

Looking for a new career? Love fast food? Food styling is a fabulous option!

Food stylists – not to be confused with false advertisers – inject, primp, plump, puff, mist, sparkle, and gussy up tired buns and stale shrivelings to look delicious, colorful and appealing. You can thank Elmer’s glue for those crispy bran flakes preening proudly in glistening “milk” (as pictured on the box). Cocoa is often made extra frothy by way of detergent (wonderful, but is it phosphate-free?). Gels, glazes, styrofoam, paint, and plenty of tweezers for all those pesky stray sesame seeds – well, these tools are all in a day’s work for a food stylist. Food styling is both deceptive and legal, so give McDonald’s a call now!

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