Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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August 09 2018

Mark’s Resistance Band Workout at Home

By Mark Sisson
18 Comments

I hear people say all the time they don’t work out because they can’t make it to the gym or they don’t have the right equipment. Or (the big one)…they don’t have time. As someone who’s always on-the-go, I know I have to make my workouts fit my lifestyle. For me, that means having options I can do anywhere with minimal equipment and a short time investment.

This “Road Warrior” workout is exactly that. If you have a resistance band (you can pick a set at Amazon for under $20 easily) and a floor, you’re set. It’s the ultimate do anywhere, no excuses routine. Check it out.

Resistance Band Pull-Apart Warm-Up (Front and Back)

Do 10 pulls behind the head.

Do 10 in front.

Side Delt Raises

Stepping on the middle of the resistance band with one foot, pull the handles up at your sides. Do 10 raises.

Front Delt Raises

Keeping your foot on the band, this time pull the handles up in front of your body. Do 10 raises.

Air Squats

Step your feet shoulder-width apart. Keeping your back straight, squat as you bring your hands to the front each time. Do 25 squats.

Pushups

Drop and do 25 pushups.

Repeat the set four times.

Now you’re done. How’s that for simple?

Watch below for the full workout put together. 

Let me know your thoughts on the video. Are you looking for more quick and easy workouts? Are you digging the video content? What are you doing for simple routines these days. Thanks for stopping by, everybody.

TAGS:  mobility

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18 thoughts on “Mark’s Resistance Band Workout at Home”

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  1. This is a great article. I always suffered from the “it’s not as good as a gym” so even if I am home, and have very limited time (especially not enough time to hit the gym), I would skip using bands or body weight exercises. However, I decided it was much better than nothing and it is amazing how much “just doing something” to keep the gains you made at the gym feels. So, no, it’s not going o replace a good focused workout at the gym (even if you keep it short and primal), but do it anyway and you will surprised at the results…especially if you are a road warrior.

  2. I just use the PEM (Primal Essential Movements) when on the road. Pullups, squats, pushups and planks plus some tricep dips. I’ve only broken one bathroom door in a hotel by doing my pullups with the door half open and hanging on it. I should probably bring a portable pullup bar. I already bring the portable Squatty Potty.

    1. Omg, I am dying about the portable Squatty Potty! I thought I was bad lugging around collagen, ghee, an immersion blender, yoga mat….my husband would seriously roll his eyes if I added the Squatty Potty into the mix.

      But I am also a huge fan of the PEMs while traveling. I combine them with hiking/walking/yoga and I am good to go!

  3. This is great and exactly what people need to see. There are so many easy things to do at home and it doesn’t take much time. I love air squats, planks and pushups. I’ll squeeze in air squats while I’m brushing my teeth sometimes. Stairs are great too…I’m constantly up and down the stairs at home, and when I travel try to skip the elevator as much as possible.

  4. Sensible! And with a bar you can do pull-ups and leg raises, really work it all. I like thinking of Primal fitness evolutionarily—our ancestors didn’t “train!” They lived, moving all the time, physically working, playing. Seems to me the ideal “workout” would be something minor every 15 minutes during the middle of the day, a sprint or some lifting now and then. No injuries of overtraining, no chronic anything, no ego drive, just appreciating body in space and nature and society.

  5. I love this. Videos make it easier for me. I am a 49 year old and while I walk a lot, I stuggle with finding strength exercises that I like and can stick to. Convenience is a must. Would this routine qualify as a “strength workout” to be used a couple times a week for someone like me who is aging and needs to build or maintain muscle mass? Thank you!!!

    1. It should work just fine.

      I started not able to do ANY pushups and began with doing them leaning on a counter (I think that’s called ‘inclined’) and now I’m up to 20 regular pushups 2 or 3 times a day without much issue. And I didn’t start any of this until I was 58…

      I found it to be a positive feedback loop – the more I did, the more I felt like doing, rinse & repeat. 🙂

      JD

      1. Thank you! It is inspiring that you started at a later age and have progressed so much.

    2. ditto – so happy to see this! Please do more like this!!

  6. This is exactly the stuff I’d like to see! It’s encouraging to see how a decent workout can still be performed with simple, minimal equipment and accessories, which can fit into even the most busy, stressful of days and situations. Thanks for highlighting the importance of simple exercises, warmups, stretches, mobility and recovery techniques as well. Keep them coming!

  7. Love the video! Yes, would like to see more along these lines.

  8. I love this Mark! The closest gym to me is 70+ miles, but I don’t think I would visit one even if it was accessible. I just love my home and outdoor workouts so much. I love trying new things, so I’ll incorporate these band exercises into my morning routine tomorrow. Thank you!

  9. I made a resistance band device out of garden hose and bungee cord. I used four sections of the hose about five inches each and about a 10 foot section of bungee cord. To make it I put all four sections in the middle of the cord and ran the cord back through the two middle hose sections to make T-handles. Then tied the two lose ends of the bungee in a square knot to complete the device. The advantage over the commercial options, the resistance is fully adjustable and it converts to a jumprope, and it breaks down for no excuse portability.

  10. LOVE the short videos – keep making them! Also if you could detail the movements/form when necessary for those who aren’t familiar. Thank you 🙂