Category: Treats

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Scones

There’s nothing better than enjoying a fresh scone with your morning coffee or tea. Since fall is now in full swing it’s only appropriate that even morning scones have a hint of pumpkin. Not only does pumpkin mix well with spices such as cinnamon, ginger, cardamon but there are also numerous health benefits to pumpkin. Plus, this recipe for pumpkin scones calls for almond flour, making it gluten-free. If you’re looking for more texture, add chopped nuts to the scone dough like pecans or walnuts.
How to make gluten-free pumpkin scones
First, preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Next, combine the milk and vinegar and let rest for about 5 minutes. While you’re waiting combine the almond flour, 5.5 tablespoons of tapioca, sugar, coconut flour, baking powder, spices and salt in a bowl. Add the cold butter to the bowl and cut the butter into the flour mixture using a fork or pastry cutter. In the end, the butter should be in very tiny pieces incorporated into the flour and the resulting flour should look like crumbly sand.

Add the milk mixture, pumpkin and vanilla to the bowl and mix together with a spatula or spoon until just combined. Let the dough rest for 2-3 minutes. Place a piece of parchment or a silicone mat on a sheet pan and sprinkle the remaining tapioca starch on it. Scoop the dough out on the pan and form it into a ball. Form the dough into a flattened round disk about an inch or so thick. Use a large knife to cut the disk into 6 or 8 sections.

Place the pan in the oven at 375 degrees for about 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and use a knife to cut deeper into the slices. Place the pan back in the oven for 10 more minutes. Remove the pan from the oven again and use the knife to carefully separate the cut sections so each scone is a separate triangle so each side of the scone can be exposed to the heat in the oven. Reduce the heat to 350 degrees and continue baking for about 10-15 minutes, or until the undersides of the scones are slightly golden. Let the scones cool before handling them.

Enjoy the scones as is, or drizzle them with your choice of melted coconut butter mixed with stevia or monkfruit drops, or an icing made from powdered sugar or sugar substitute like powdered erythritol and milk.

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Macadamia Nut Cookie Bars (Keto and Paleo!)

These macadamia nut cookie bars are our take on a classic blondie recipe. Blondies have more fun, right?

Blondie bars are similar to brownies, but instead of cocoa they feature vanilla and, usually, brown sugar. We wanted ours to be a Primal, paleo, and keto-friendly dessert recipe, so these bars get their signature flavor from monk fruit sweetener and something cool and unexpected: macadamia nut butter!

Macadamia nuts are a good source of monounsaturated fats, and a quarter-cup of macadamias provides 77 percent of your daily manganese requirement and 28 percent of your copper. And don’t even get us started on their creamy texture, which makes these blondie cookie bars all the more decadent.

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London Fog Drink – Earl Grey Tea Latte Recipe

Next time you want to sip on something warm and comforting, try a London Fog Latte. I’ve been hooked ever since a friend encouraged me to order one at a local coffee shop. As soon as I took my first sip, I was determined to figure out how to make them myself.

A London Fog Latte is now my go-to drink whenever I need a hug in a mug. Start-to-finish, it takes about as long as brewing a cup of coffee, and you probably have all of the ingredients on hand right now.

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Ultimate Primal Pumpkin Pie

Traditions are a big part of the holiday season for many people, but if you find yourself doing something strictly out of tradition and not because you particularly enjoy it, then it’s time for a new tradition. Or maybe, just time for a new recipe. Take pumpkin pie. It’s hard to imagine Thanksgiving without one, but too often it’s a soggy, bland dessert that disappoints. Made with a cup of sugar and white flour crust, it’s an indulgence that’s not always worth it.

But what if you broke from the traditional recipe by taking the granulated sugar and flour out—and it actually made the pie taste better? What if this new and slightly untraditional version of pumpkin pie had a buttery, crunchy crust and silky-smooth filling? Sure, you could call this new and improved version Primal Pumpkin Pie. Or, you could just call it by another name: Damn Good Pie.

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Primal Peanut Butter Cups

With Halloween just around the corner, we couldn’t let the occasion go by without sharing a Primal treat for good fun. While we’re not promoting the usual sugar spree, a little something can feel festive especially if you’re playing host.

These nut butter cups deliver on richness (and sweetness) and offer a more natural alternative to the packaged, preservative-filled candies most will get in their pumpkins that night. Gather the little ghosts and ghouls to help you in the kitchen. This recipe is easy, fast, and family-friendly.

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Gluten-free Low-Carb Pumpkin Bread

October means pumpkin…everything. Those who eating low-carb, however, may believe that most of those treats are off the menu. Not so. It’s possible to enjoy a variety of traditional pumpkin recipes (including pumpkin pie and this pumpkin bread) while you keep your low-carb commitment. Made with the goodness of almond flour, eggs, and all the traditional spices, this pumpkin bread bakes up moist and flavorful. Pumpkin puree rather than pumpkin pie filling means you can sweeten to your own taste. And don’t worry about sugar—this recipe doesn’t have any. It uses a popular low-carb standby—Swerve—to add sweetness without the sugar content.

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