Category: Snacks

Sardine Butter and Parmigiano-Reggiano Sesame Crisps

Sardine Butter. Does the combination of these two words have you salivating or grimacing? Canned sardines are a delicious, nutritious fish, but they aren’t everyone’s favorite. The flavor can be a little, well, fishy. But there are a lot of omega-3s and other nutrients packed into those small, oily little fish, so finding a way to love ‘em is a worthwhile endeavor.

Butter, on the other hand…who doesn’t love butter? Mashing butter and canned sardines together with lemon and cayenne makes a simple but stunning spread. Sardine butter has a more assertive, less delicate flavor than anchovy butter. But sardine butter is much less “fishy” than sardines straight out of the can (if that’s a plus for your taste buds).

In recipes like this, with so few ingredients, quality matters. Use your favorite salted butter, hopefully one that’s pastured or cultured. Grab a few cans of sardines from the grocery store, taste-testing to find you favorite. Boneless sardines give the butter a smoother texture, but if you don’t mind a little crunchiness (and want the calcium) then go ahead and use bone-in. Whether they’re smoked or un-smoked, packed in water or olive oil, is your choice.

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Marinated Olives and Nuts

Olives and nuts marinated in extra virgin olive oil with rosemary, lemon zest, fennel seeds and hot pepper, is a savory, salty snack swirling with healthy fat, antioxidants, fiber, iron and copper. Plus, it’s a two-for-one recipe, in that you can eat the olives and nuts and then use the flavored olive oil for cooking or making salad dressing.

Walnuts taste great with olives, but, for this recipe, any type of nut will work, so take your pick. Same goes for olives. Buy black and green olives with pits, of any variety and size. Give them a few days to soak up the flavors in the spicy, herbal, citrusy marinade then serve the olives and nuts as an appetizer, bring them as a hostess gift, or use them as a garnish for roasted vegetables and meat, a whole chicken, or fish.

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Dulse “Bacon” and Eggs

Dulse, a type of red seaweed with high amounts of magnesium and calcium, has gotten some attention for tasting like bacon from the sea. Is it just media hype, or is it possible that dulse (pronounced duhls) really does taste like meaty, salty, fatty bacon?

Dried, whole leaf dulse can be eaten right out of the bag. It’s a bit chewy, tastes very salty, a little smoky and has that fresh-from-the-ocean seaweed flavor. When dulse is heated in a skillet with a little oil, it changes. The texture gets crispy, the seaweed flavor fades and the smokiness get stronger. It does indeed have some bacon-like qualities.

Even so, if you expect the dulse to taste exactly like bacon you’ll be disappointed. There is nothing like bacon…except bacon. But if you taste pan-fried dulse with a forkful of scrambled eggs and an open mind, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how well the smoky, salty flavor pairs with eggs. It’s not exactly like traditional eggs and bacon, but it’s a breakfast that’s good in its own right.

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Chicken Skin Chips

Chips made from root vegetables or kale are all well and good, but once you’ve tried chicken skin chips they’ll be the only chip you crave. Like regular potato chips, the salty, oily flavor is truly addictive and the light, crispy texture shatters like glass when you take a bite. The only problem with these chips is that they require self-control. Although, if you’re going to eat one too many chips, then they might as well be made from chicken skin.

Animal skin is high in fat, collagen and gelatin. All three are good for joints, nails, hair, and skin. Of course, the healthier the chicken, the healthier the skin will be (pastured, organic, and antibiotic free are labels to looks for).

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Primal Salmon Spread with Nori Chips

This salmon spread, made from both poached and smoked salmon mashed with butter, is a version of French rillettes. Rillettes, which are similar to pâté, are made from blending together protein and fat. Could there be a better snack?

Rillettes are often made with pork, duck or rabbit meat and lard, but using salmon and butter is easier and a genius way to make creamy salmon spread without adding mayonnaise, cream cheese or sour cream. The blend of salmon and butter (with just a drizzle of olive oil) is flavored with chives, capers and lemon.

There’s really no reason not to treat this “spread” like a salad and eat it with a fork, but if you want finger food then serve salmon rillettes on crispy nori chips.

This salmon rillettes recipe is adapted from the book “Cooking at Home on Rue Tatin.”

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Chia Flax Hot Pudding

This is a guest post by Kelly LeVeque. Kelly is a certified holistic nutritionist, wellness expert and celebrity health coach based in Los Angeles, California. Be Well grew out of Kelly’s lifelong passion for health, the science of nutrition and overall wellness. Guided by a practical and always optimistic approach, Kelly helps clients improve their health, achieve their goals and develop sustainable habits to live a healthy and balanced life.

Good Morning! I’m Kelly LeVeque, nutritionist at Be Well by Kelly. You might have heard of my #bewellsmoothie—it’s a formula created to help my clients make the perfect meal replacement shake. The #bewellsmoothie limits fructose and ensures that there is enough protein, fat and fiber to balance blood sugar and help you calmly make it from breakfast to lunch.

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