Category: Snacks

How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke

Artichokes are a mysterious vegetable, and a lot of people are intimidated by them. How do you cook an artichoke? How do you cut into it? What parts do you eat? And how does it taste? You may have had marinated artichoke hearts that come in a jar, or you’ve noticed little strips of artichoke in your spinach dip. But eating a whole artichoke is a lot different than having prepared hearts. In this article, I’m going to show you how to prepare and eat an artichoke, along with my favorite dipping sauces. Are Artichokes Good For You? Coming in at 6g of net carbs per whole artichoke, it’s something you’ll want to add to the rotation if you’re keto. Artichokes are also an antioxidant powerhouse, and they have lots of gut-happy resistant starch. How to Buy Artichokes If you’ve never bought whole artichokes before, you might wonder how to choose good ones. Here’s what to look for: Tight leaves. Your artichoke should look like a giant flower bud. Leaves should not be curling out like a blooming flower. Heft. Pick up a few, and feel their weight. Heavier artichokes are fresher, and lighter ones are older and perhaps dried out. Brown streaks on the outside, or not. A little browning on the outside is nothing to be concerned about. Some people say that the ones with brown streaks are sweeter because the frost that caused them brings out the natural sugars. Once your artichokes are cleaned and steamed properly, the leaves and heart are excellent vehicles for dips. How to Cook an Artichoke (Steam Method) Serves: 2-4 Time in the kitchen: 45 minutes, including 35 minutes steaming time Ingredients 2 artichokes Primal Kitchen® Mayo with Avocado Oil, or Rosemary and Garlic Vegan Mayo if you cannot tolerate eggs 1 lemon Fresh cracked black pepper Directions To prepare an artichoke, first cut off most of the stem on top, leaving about ¼” of the stem left intact. Cut off the tough bottom of the artichoke, about 1” worth. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tough prickly ends of the artichoke leaves. Cut a lemon in half and rub the cut side all of the cut end of the artichoke. Set up a steamer by filling a pot with some water and a squeeze of lemon. Once the water is boiling, set the heat so the water is at a steady simmer. Set up the steamer basket inside and place the artichokes in the basket cut side down. Place the lid on and allow the artichokes to steam for around 30 minutes, 35 minutes if they’re quite large. You know they’re finished when you can put a knife through the center of the stem with little resistance. Allow the artichokes to cool. Combine your favorite Primal Kitchen Mayo with a squeeze of lemon and fresh cracked pepper. How to Eat an Artichoke This part is easy. Once your artichoke is cooled, peel the leaves off of one by one, dip in … Continue reading “How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke”

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How to Make Pemmican

If you’ve ever had a meat or jerky bar made of finely chopped dried meat and perhaps berries, you may be familiar with pemmican. Pemmican consists of lean, dried meat – usually beef nowadays, but bison, deer, and elk were common back in the day) which is crushed to a powder and mixed with an equal amount of hot, rendered fat, usually beef tallow. Sometimes crushed, dried berries are added as well. For long periods of time, people can subsist entirely on pemmican, drawing on the fat for energy and the protein for strength, and glucose, when needed.

Vihljamur Stefansson, eminent anthropologist and arctic explorer, went on three expeditions into the Alaskan tundra during the first quarter of the 20th century. His discoveries – including the “blond” Inuit and previously uncharted Arctic lands – brought him renown on the world stage. People were fascinated by his approach to travel and exploration, the way he thrust himself fully into the native Inuit cultures he encountered. Stefansson studied their language, adopted their ways, and ate the same food they ate. In fact, it was the diet of the Inuit – fish, marine mammals, and other animals, with almost no vegetables or carbohydrates – that most intrigued him. He noted that, though their diet would be considered nutritionally bereft by most “experts” (hey, nothing’s changed in a hundred years!), the Inuit seemed to be in excellent health, with strong teeth, bones, and muscles. He was particularly interested pemmican.

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Keto Angel Food Cake

For whatever reason, angel food cake seems to make its yearly debut during that time when warmer weather breaks. Is it the toppings – fresh berries, or a perfectly ripe peach? Is it those first rays of sunshine after a cold winter that make you want something pillowy soft and sweet? There could be a hundred reasons why angel food cake is a slice of spring on a plate. Angel food cake may be something you considered a cheat, until now. Traditional angel food cake recipes call for a lot of sugar – since there’s no frosting, the cake has to be sweet on its own. This keto angel food cake recipe gives you all of the light, airy sweetness without the aftermath that comes with a sugary dessert. And, it’s surprisingly easy to make. Proper whisking of the egg whites can be intimidating, but you won’t mess it up. The key is to stop whisking when you get “soft peaks.” You’ll know you’re there when you can make small rolling hills in your egg white mixture by slowly lifting your whisk out of the bowl. Here’s how to do it. Keto Angel Food Cake Recipe Serves: 6 Time in the kitchen: 25 minutes, including 15 minutes bake time Ingredients 1/2 cup almond flour 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp. Lakanto powdered monkfruit 2:1 sweetener 3 Tbsp. coconut flour pinch of salt 9 large egg whites 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3/4 tsp. cream of tartar coconut whipped cream, chopped dark chocolate, or fresh berries (optional) Directions Prior to whisking up the egg whites, preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a 8” cake pan with parchment paper. Mix the almond flour, granulated monk fruit sweetener, coconut flour and a pinch of salt in a small bowl and set aside. Crack the egg whites in a clean, dry mixing bowl. Whisk vigorously with a whisk or hand mixer until the mixture becomes very frothy. Add the cream of tartar and vanilla extract and continue whisking vigorously. You want to continue whisking until the egg whites become just slightly stiff and form soft peaks when you lift up the whisk. Once the egg whites look white, instead of clear, and you can make peaks on the surface with your whisk, carefully fold the dry ingredients into the egg whites with a flexible spatula, adding the dry ingredients a little at a time until the batter is mixed. Do this gently to prevent the egg whites from collapsing. Quickly pour the batter into the lined round pan and place it into the oven. Bake for 15-17 minutes, or until the cake begins to brown on top and the center feels firm. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool. Top your cake slices with dollops of coconut cream, chopped dark chocolate and fresh strawberries. Tips For a Perfect Keto Angel Food Cake The whisked egg whites are delicate, so gently (but quickly) fold in the dry ingredients and place … Continue reading “Keto Angel Food Cake”

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Pesto Egg Salad Recipe

Transform boring egg salad with Primal Kitchen®Pesto Mayo and roasted garlic. We served the egg salad in endive leaves, but you can also use celery, lettuce, or nori sheets. To avoid the garlic from touching aluminum foil when roasting, first wrap the cut head of garlic with a piece of parchment to make a pouch, and fold the parchment over the top, then wrap the foil around the parchment to make a sealed pouch.

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Primal Breakfast Cookies Recipe

Breakfast cookies are a fantastic way to get some on-the-go nutrition. These cookies are loaded with healthy fats, different forms of protein, and a little sweetness and crunch. The ground cashews provide a sweet and nutty cookie that’s milder compared to almond-based cookies. Feel free to swap out ingredients to change the flavor of the cookies. Try different nuts or seeds, a mashed banana instead of applesauce, or a different flavor of collagen.

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Primal and Keto Collagen Recipes

Mark’s said it before: He advocates for collagen to become the fourth macronutrient. Collagen supports collagen-based structures in the body, such as fascia, ligaments, tendons, cartilage, skin, nails, and hair, and most of us just don’t get enough of it from meat, dairy, eggs, or plant proteins. Learn more about the important role glycine, the primary amino acid found in collagen protein, and check out our creative culinary ways to include more collagen in your diet.
Reasons to Include Collagen in Your Diet
Most people regard amino acids in one of two ways: essential, meaning our bodies can’t synthesize them, or inessential, meaning our bodies can. There’s also a third category of amino acids: conditionally essential, which become essential in times of illness and heightened stress. One such conditionally essential amino acid is glycine.

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