Category: Sides

Thick & Creamy Labneh

Labneh is a type of Middle Eastern “cheese” made from strained yogurt. Thick and creamy with a mild, tangy flavor, labneh is typically served as a spread or dip. Although labneh can be found in many grocery stores, it’s also really easy to make at home. And if you make it with organic, full-fat cultured yogurt, it’s chock-full of good saturated fat and beneficial probiotics.

Even so, you might be thinking, “Dairy? Really?” If that’s the case, then this recipe might not be for you. It’s true that some people don’t tolerate dairy well. But it’s also true that for others, a little bit of dairy can be part of a healthy, well-rounded diet. As noted in this definitive guide, dairy resides in Primal limbo. If you do indulge, then homemade labneh can be a delicious savory treat.

Making labneh is simple: Wrap full-fat yogurt in cheesecloth and let the moisture drain out for 12 to 24 hours, depending on how thick you want it. Then, pour really good extra virgin olive oil on top and if you like, throw in some herbs and/or spices. Mint, basil, parsley, and chives are good; so are za’atar, black pepper and cumin.

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Rosemary Aioli and Kaleidoscope Fries

This is a guest post from Leslie Klenke, author of Paleo Girl, and our very own Marketing Manager here at Primal Nutrition, LLC. Don’t miss the Paleo Girl One-Year Anniversary Giveaway with over $1,700 worth of paleo prizes. Expires June 18.

Hi, friends! Leslie here, and I’m amped to be back on the MDA blog again—this time I’m coming at ya with a delicious recipe I whipped up using Primal Kitchen™ Mayo!

I’m a mayo fanatic. I used to feel gross for having an obsession with the condiment (because of the unhealthy industrial seed oils and the shame from mayo haters), but now that Primal Kitchen has launched the world’s first healthy mayo—made with pure avocado oil—I don’t have to feel like such a weirdo for dipping my fries in its creamy magic.

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Anchovy Butter

Just when you thought butter couldn’t get any better, there’s anchovy butter. It’s an umami-rich secret ingredient that transforms simply cooked meat and veggies into an amazing meal. Don’t worry, anchovy butter won’t make your food taste fishy. Rather, it gives everything it touches a subtle, savory flavor boost. Meat tastes meatier. Veggies taste bolder.

A batch of anchovy butter can be kept in the fridge (or freezer) and sliced as needed. Melt it over steak and roasted and raw vegetables. Use it to sauté just about anything. When you have anchovy butter in the fridge, elevating a meal from good to great is so much easier. Don’t worry about fancy sauces or seasonings – just come home, throw your steak on the grill and your veggies in a pan. Then smother it all in luscious anchovy butter. It doesn’t get much easier, or much tastier, than that.

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Paleo Broccoli Salad

This a guest post from Natasha of The Feisty Kitchen.

Broccoli Salad. I know this isn’t quite something you’d think of for the middle of January, but I got it stuck in my head, and had to make it. So there’s that. My version has a few twists in it but still reminds you of that classic Broccoli Salad that your aunt or somebody would bring over to the summer potluck!

I don’t care for raisins. Like not one bit, so I subbed in organic dried goji berries and still achieved that little hint of sweetness in the dish. Raw red onions are another one of those things I just can’t do. Luckily I do like raw shallots, so that was a perfect substitution in this recipe and I opted to add it in minced in the dressing portion rather than in a dice in the salad, so it’s just a hint. I also don’t care for sugar and soybean oil filled mayos. Gross. I was lucky enough to get my hands on some new Paleo Approved Mayo by Mark Sisson’s Primal Kitchen Foods… It’s sooo yummilicious! It’s made using avocado oil, cage free eggs, and it’s free of sugar, soy and canola! It’s amazing!

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Crock Pot Turkey and Primal Stuffing

It’s easy to associate cooking a turkey with a long, laborious process and a huge amount of meat. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Whether you’re cooking Thanksgiving dinner for only 1 or 2 people, or you’re looking for an easier way to cook turkey so you can banish processed deli turkey from your life, this recipe for Crock-Pot turkey breast is what you need.

Turkey breasts on the bone are sold in most grocery stores year round. Crock-Pots are known for keeping meat moist and tender over a long, slow cooking time and turkey breast is no exception. Rub the bird down with herbs and butter (or just season liberally with spices), leave it alone for 7 hours, and return to a house that smells like Thanksgiving – even if it’s the middle of summer. No fuss, no muss.

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Salami Vinaigrette

Chorizo vinaigrette doesn’t have a lot of eye appeal, but the garlicky pork flavor is even better than bacon on a spinach salad. Add mushrooms, hard boiled egg and warm caramelized red onion to wilt the greens and the salad is plenty appetizing, even without a gorgeous dressing.

While it’s not a good idea to dress every salad with vinaigrette made from cured meat, this recipe only uses 2 ounces of high-quality salami and delivers a whole lot of flavor. If you’re spinach adverse, or vegetable adverse for that matter, maybe a drizzle of chorizo vinaigrette will help the veggies go down. Chorizo vinaigrette is also delicious over roasted vegetables, sautéed greens of any kind (and grilled seafood).

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