Category: Sides

Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho with Hardboiled Eggs and Avocado

With summer basically here, I thought a nice gazpacho recipe was in order.

Gazpacho is the chilled, tomato-based raw soup that originated in Andalusia, Spain, possibly after the Moorish incursion brought a simple peasant’s soup of olive oil, water, garlic, and stale bread to the region. Fortunately, those peasants soon grew tired of their meager gruel and began incorporating fresh vegetables from the fields to liven up the dish. Onions, cucumbers, and various herbs were standard fare until Columbus brought back tomatoes and peppers from the New World. Today, gazpacho is best known as a cold tomato soup, but good gazpacho is much, much more than throwing a can of Campbell’s in the fridge. Truly excellent gazpacho must be fresh and feature a wide range of interplaying flavors. Consistency ranges from truly smooth and soupy to thick and chunky (almost like a salsa), but fresh vegetables and quality ingredients are always key.

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Fiddlehead Ferns With Bacon, Browned Garlic and Onion, and White Wine Reduction

As promised yesterday, I’ve prepared an incredibly simple yet delicious Primal Fiddlehead Fern recipe. I originally planned on making a big dish, with lots of ingredients, but I realized that doing so could weaken the presence of the fern. Since these things are relatively rare, I wanted to make sure they were the stars of the show and didn’t get lost in the melee.

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The Low-Carb Wonders of Jicama

Jicama is that white, crispy tuberous root that the fruit cart guys always douse in chile power and lime and serve on a stick. The naturally-occurring oligofructose inulin lends it a slightly sweet flavor. It’s tasty, refreshing, and seemingly innocuous – but is it loaded with carbs? It seems a little carby, and I’ve mostly avoided it (a difficult task in Southern California where fruit carts beckon from every other street corner) for that very reason, but a couple reader comments have prompted an investigation.

If my informed, Primal readership was supporting jicama consumption, surely there was more to it.

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The Wonderful, Pungent World of Sauerkraut

Although fermented cabbage has been around in some form or another since ancient times – Roman author Pliny the Elder wrote of the stuff in the first century A.D. – modern methods for making sauerkraut were developed sometime between the 16th and 18th centuries. It’s primarily known as a German staple, but most other European countries use it in their traditional dishes. It’s pretty easy to understand why it was so popular: it keeps for a long time without refrigeration. Dutch, German, and English sailors found that the vitamin C-rich kraut prevented scurvy on the open seas, and the fact that it was salted and fermented made it ideal for long voyages without other preservation methods.

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Primal Comfort Foods

Cold weather has a way of encouraging comfort food eating, and partaking in traditional comfort foods typically means derailing your healthy eating plan with carbs, carbs and more carbs. Fortunately, in many cases you don’t have to compromise. If the winter weather has you reaching for easy to prepare and familiar foods that will warm you from within, sidestep the mac and cheese and baked potatoes for these perfectly Primal comfort food alternatives.

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Hot, Hot, Hot: How to Make the Ultimate Salsa

The term salsa might by synonymous with chips but, realistically, there are plenty of uses for good ol’ salsa. Salsa makes a great filling for omelets, can be used to spice up – and keep moist – oven-baked chicken, to add bulk (and flavor) to burger patties, and even as a substitute for salad dressing. In fact, one source we referenced suggested that the Aztecs awaited the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors with pots of a boiling salsa in the hopes that theinvading troops would actually become the main course!

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