Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Breakfast

Primal N’Oatmeal

On mornings when a bowl of oatmeal is what your body craves, this hearty and comforting Primal breakfast cereal is exactly what you need. Coconut flakes, almonds, pecans, and the milk of your choice are blended into a creamy, oatmeal-like cereal that’s sweetened with a single Medjool date and topped with fresh berries.

Make Primal oatmeal in the morning, or the night before. Serve it hot, or cold. Personalize your bowl by using different types of nuts and non-dairy milks, sweetening with pure maple syrup instead of a Medjool date, and adding more flavor and nutrients with add-ins like butter, cinnamon, Primal Fuel, powdered gelatin or chia seeds. However you do it, “oatmeal” doesn’t get any tastier than this.

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Pork Belly with Sweet Potatoes and Fried Eggs

This is not your typical breakfast of eggs, potatoes and bacon. Instead, we’re talking about braised pork belly (the same cut that bacon comes from), sweet potatoes roasted with smoked paprika butter, and the runny yolk from a fried egg drenching the whole thing.

First, the pork belly. This is a cut of pork with a huge amount of flavor for a relatively low cost. Succulent and fatty, it’s one of the easiest cuts of pork to cook into mouth-watering tenderness. It takes several hours to braise pork belly, so plan to start this recipe the day before (and if you want more leftovers, plan to buy 3 pounds of pork belly, instead of 2).

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Primal Korean Bibimbap

Bibimbap, a dish made up of white rice mixed with vegetables, meat, egg and a fermented condiment or two, is Korean comfort food. A quick Primal change (switching out white rice for cauliflower rice and modifying the beef marinade) turns Bibimbap into comfort food that’s also quite healthy.

The crowning glory of this flavorful one bowl meal is gochujang, a fermented paste made of chili peppers, soybeans, rice, and salt. The flavor is salty, slightly sweet and spicy. If you like your food spicy, there are infinite ways to use gochujang. Serve it with meat and vegetables, scrambled eggs, or stirred into soup and stews.

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Beef Bone Broth Variations

Bone broth has been getting so much buzz, it doesn’t need a lengthy introduction. By now, you probably know that sipping a warm mug of broth is not only soothing, but also a nourishing source of gelatin. So, you keep a supply of bone broth in your refrigerator or freezer*. And you’re sipping mugs of it, and it’s soothing, and nourishing, and all that—but it’s also getting a little boring. Not because you don’t like bone broth. It’s just that you’re craving a little more flavor, a little more pizazz, a little something different than a basic mug of broth. Perhaps broth with the rich flavor of porcini mushrooms? Or the spicy kick of Sichuan peppercorns? How about of mug of broth laced with the exotic flavor of cinnamon, ginger and star anise, or the comforting flavor of butter and leeks?

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Kimchi Pancakes

Kimchi is great as a side dish, but it’s also really delicious as a main ingredient. Take kimchi soup, for example. Or, these savory egg pancakes laced with kimchi, scallions and garlic, and served with sesame dipping sauce.

It’s important to supplement your diet with fermented foods and these savory pancakes are a tasty way to do it. Kimchi is just one of many fermented foods that can help build up an army of gut flora for you. These pancakes also use potato starch as an ingredient, a resistant starch that can feed gut bacteria. However, the starch is heated, which can negate its RS function. So in this case, the potato starch is mainly there to give the pancakes a crispy and chewy texture without using regular all-purpose flour.

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Dulse “Bacon” and Eggs

Dulse, a type of red seaweed with high amounts of magnesium and calcium, has gotten some attention for tasting like bacon from the sea. Is it just media hype, or is it possible that dulse (pronounced duhls) really does taste like meaty, salty, fatty bacon?

Dried, whole leaf dulse can be eaten right out of the bag. It’s a bit chewy, tastes very salty, a little smoky and has that fresh-from-the-ocean seaweed flavor. When dulse is heated in a skillet with a little oil, it changes. The texture gets crispy, the seaweed flavor fades and the smokiness get stronger. It does indeed have some bacon-like qualities.

Even so, if you expect the dulse to taste exactly like bacon you’ll be disappointed. There is nothing like bacon…except bacon. But if you taste pan-fried dulse with a forkful of scrambled eggs and an open mind, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how well the smoky, salty flavor pairs with eggs. It’s not exactly like traditional eggs and bacon, but it’s a breakfast that’s good in its own right.

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