Category: Vegetables

Grilled Greek Summer Veggies Recipe

When planning a BBQ menu, the meat is usually the star, and the sides are an afterthought. With this Grilled Greek Summer Veggies recipe, a platter overflowing with colorful marinated and grilled vegetables steals the show.

This is the perfect vegetable side dish for summer. It’s very no-fuss, keeps well in the refrigerator to eat throughout the week, and can feed a crowd.
Customizing Your Greek Grilled Veggies
You’ll find that this recipe adapts well to small tweaks to suit your tastes. Here are a few ways to make it your own:

Use your favorite veggies. Feel free to swap out vegetables and grill what you love.
Make them thicker if you’d like. We sliced each of these vegetables around ¼-?” thick so they will grill quickly, but you can slice them thicker if you like meatier veggies.
Switch up the dressing for fun. This dish would also be tasty with the Primal Kitchen Italian Dressing or Primal Kitchen Oil and Vinegar Dressing in lieu of the Greek dressing.
Stovetop option. If you don’t have a grill, these can be made in a grill pan on the stovetop, or even roasted on a parchment-covered sheet pan in your oven. Roast at 400 degrees for 15 minutes on each side, or until nicely browned.

Here’s how to make your new favorite BBQ side dish.
Grilled Greek Summer Vegetables Recipe
Time in the kitchen: 20 minutes

Servings: 4
Ingredients

1 medium eggplant, sliced into rounds
1 medium zucchini, sliced
1 yellow squash, sliced into rounds
1 red bell pepper, cored and cut into thick slices
1 small red onion, sliced into rounds
8 oz. cremini mushrooms (you can cut them in half if you’d like)
? cup Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing, divided
2 Tbsp. Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil
2 cloves grated garlic
Pinch of salt and pepper
Chopped parsley
Optional: chopped oregano, crumbled feta cheese

Directions
In a bowl, combine ¼ cup of Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing, Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Toss all of the vegetables in the sauce. Allow the vegetables to marinate for 30 minutes, tossing them once or twice during this time.

Preheat your grill over medium heat. Once hot, carefully place the vegetables on the grill. After 1-2 minutes, turn each of them 90 degrees to get nice grill marks.

Grill for an additional 1-2 minutes, then flip over the vegetables and grill for an additional 2-3 minutes, or until they are nicely grilled on the outside and tender on the inside (this time will depend on how thick you slice them).

Drizzle the remaining Primal Kitchen Greek Dressing on top and garnish with chopped parsley and feta if desired.

 

Nutrition Info (4 servings):
Calories: 222
Fat: 18g
Total Carbs: 14g
Net Carbs: 9g
Protein: 4g
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How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke

Artichokes are a mysterious vegetable, and a lot of people are intimidated by them. How do you cook an artichoke? How do you cut into it? What parts do you eat? And how does it taste? You may have had marinated artichoke hearts that come in a jar, or you’ve noticed little strips of artichoke in your spinach dip. But eating a whole artichoke is a lot different than having prepared hearts. In this article, I’m going to show you how to prepare and eat an artichoke, along with my favorite dipping sauces. Are Artichokes Good For You? Coming in at 6g of net carbs per whole artichoke, it’s something you’ll want to add to the rotation if you’re keto. Artichokes are also an antioxidant powerhouse, and they have lots of gut-happy resistant starch. How to Buy Artichokes If you’ve never bought whole artichokes before, you might wonder how to choose good ones. Here’s what to look for: Tight leaves. Your artichoke should look like a giant flower bud. Leaves should not be curling out like a blooming flower. Heft. Pick up a few, and feel their weight. Heavier artichokes are fresher, and lighter ones are older and perhaps dried out. Brown streaks on the outside, or not. A little browning on the outside is nothing to be concerned about. Some people say that the ones with brown streaks are sweeter because the frost that caused them brings out the natural sugars. Once your artichokes are cleaned and steamed properly, the leaves and heart are excellent vehicles for dips. How to Cook an Artichoke (Steam Method) Serves: 2-4 Time in the kitchen: 45 minutes, including 35 minutes steaming time Ingredients 2 artichokes Primal Kitchen® Mayo with Avocado Oil, or Rosemary and Garlic Vegan Mayo if you cannot tolerate eggs 1 lemon Fresh cracked black pepper Directions To prepare an artichoke, first cut off most of the stem on top, leaving about ¼” of the stem left intact. Cut off the tough bottom of the artichoke, about 1” worth. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tough prickly ends of the artichoke leaves. Cut a lemon in half and rub the cut side all of the cut end of the artichoke. Set up a steamer by filling a pot with some water and a squeeze of lemon. Once the water is boiling, set the heat so the water is at a steady simmer. Set up the steamer basket inside and place the artichokes in the basket cut side down. Place the lid on and allow the artichokes to steam for around 30 minutes, 35 minutes if they’re quite large. You know they’re finished when you can put a knife through the center of the stem with little resistance. Allow the artichokes to cool. Combine your favorite Primal Kitchen Mayo with a squeeze of lemon and fresh cracked pepper. How to Eat an Artichoke This part is easy. Once your artichoke is cooled, peel the leaves off of one by one, dip in … Continue reading “How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke”

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Sauerkraut Benefits (with an Easy Homemade Sauerkraut Recipe)

Although fermented cabbage has been around in some form or another since ancient times – Roman author Pliny the Elder wrote of the stuff in the first century A.D. – modern methods for making sauerkraut were developed sometime between the 16th and 18th centuries. It’s primarily known as a German staple, but most other European countries use it in their traditional dishes. It’s pretty easy to understand why it was so popular: it keeps for a long time without refrigeration. Dutch, German, and English sailors found that the vitamin C-rich kraut prevented scurvy on the open seas, and the fact that it was salted and fermented made it ideal for long voyages without other preservation methods.

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Summer Broccoli Salad Recipe

Broccoli is such a versatile vegetable, and it’s fantastic in Summer salads. This salad is simple with a flavorful lemon tahini dressing. Broccoli and the other veggies in this salad are hearty, so the salad will hold up well as leftovers. The beauty of this recipe is getting all of the different
vegetables in one bite since they are chopped very small. While I may find chopping veggies back and forth on a cutting board until very fine a therapeutic and enjoyable experience, many don’t and will want to chop
everything up more quickly! To do so, roughly chop your veggies and
then pulse them in a food processor until they are chopped quite small.

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Lazy Keto Meal Plan

This post is a companion piece to the lazy keto article, which describes what lazy keto is and who might want to do it. The tl;dr (too long, didn’t read) version is that lazy keto is a simplified version of the keto diet where you only track carbs to make sure you’re under the limit to stay in ketosis. According to The Keto Reset Diet and Keto for Life, that would be about 50 grams total (gross) per day, with some wiggle room if most of your carbs are coming from non-starchy vegetables and avocados. Otherwise, you don’t micromanage your protein, fat, or total calorie intake.

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Easy Roasted Winter Vegetables Recipe

It’s a question we might ask (or be asked) every day: What’s for dinner? To keep it simple, Primal, and Primal-keto, that answer can easily be meat and vegetables every night. Day after day. There’s nothing wrong with that, folks. It gets the job done well, and the formula can be easily changed to accommodate preferences and banish boredom. Roast chicken instead of searing steak; broil salmon instead of baking pork chops; steam broccoli instead of boiling asparagus; stir-fry mixed veggies instead of serving a raw salad. You get the idea.

Roasting vegetables is an indispensable cooking technique and meal prep time-saver. Roasting veggies adds caramelized flavor that will make it a pleasure to eat any oven-kissed leftover vegetables again the next day. Make sure to pair vegetables with similar cook times together and cut the pieces in as uniform pieces as you can to ensure even cooking.

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