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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Seafood

Fish Head Broth

Fish broth isn’t as versatile as chicken or beef broth, but it’s a special thing, nevertheless. It’s delicate and savory with the appetizing flavor of seafood.

Is this the type of broth you’ll sip straight from a mug? There’s no reason not to if you like fish. Plus, you’ll get a healthy dose of omega-3s, fat-soluble vitamins, selenium, iodine, and other minerals. Enough gelatin can be extracted from a few pounds of fish parts to give your broth a gelatin-rich texture that turns to jelly when refrigerated. The most important fish part to use is the head. In fact, you can make broth entirely from fish heads, although the spine and other bones can be added as well.

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Fish Tartare: A Recipe from Good Fat, Bad Fat

In honor of Primal Blueprint Publishing’s newest release, Good Fat, Bad Fat by Romy Dollé, we thought we’d share another recipe from this healthy fat resource. If you missed the Rösti with Fried Egg recipe from Tuesday, be sure to check that out too.

While this recipe calls for 3.5 ounces of sushi rice, keep in mind you can substitute cauliflower rice for a low-carbohydrate alternative. If you’re on board with white rice, and specifically resistant starch, then prepare the recipe as is.

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One Sheet-Pan Roasted Salmon and Red Cabbage

There’s nothing better than a meal that leaves you only one pan to wash. In this recipe, red cabbage and scallions are roasted on the same pan as salmon (or other fish of your choice). It’s a simple but gorgeous meal, and one that can be eaten hot out of the oven or cold the next day mixed with salad greens.

Red cabbage is used here for its eye-catching color, but this cruciferous veg has so much more going for it than just looks. Sulfur-rich and boasting a whopping thirty-six different anthocyanins, that purple color is screaming out “antioxidants!”

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Sardine Butter and Parmigiano-Reggiano Sesame Crisps

Sardine Butter. Does the combination of these two words have you salivating or grimacing? Canned sardines are a delicious, nutritious fish, but they aren’t everyone’s favorite. The flavor can be a little, well, fishy. But there are a lot of omega-3s and other nutrients packed into those small, oily little fish, so finding a way to love ‘em is a worthwhile endeavor.

Butter, on the other hand…who doesn’t love butter? Mashing butter and canned sardines together with lemon and cayenne makes a simple but stunning spread. Sardine butter has a more assertive, less delicate flavor than anchovy butter. But sardine butter is much less “fishy” than sardines straight out of the can (if that’s a plus for your taste buds).

In recipes like this, with so few ingredients, quality matters. Use your favorite salted butter, hopefully one that’s pastured or cultured. Grab a few cans of sardines from the grocery store, taste-testing to find you favorite. Boneless sardines give the butter a smoother texture, but if you don’t mind a little crunchiness (and want the calcium) then go ahead and use bone-in. Whether they’re smoked or un-smoked, packed in water or olive oil, is your choice.

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Quick-Pickled Mussels with Seared Cherry Tomatoes

Pickling mussels after they’re cooked is a good way to serve them as an appetizer. A large batch can be made the day before and set out at room temperature with toothpicks. Although, when the mussels are served with seared cherry tomatoes, you’ll need a spoon to scoop up all the garlicky, juicy goodness. And a fork will be necessary if you choose to eat the mussels and tomatoes over a bowl of salad greens, which is a fine idea, too.

When mussels are quick-pickled, for an hour or overnight, it gives them a vinegary kick, plus the heat of smoked paprika and red pepper flakes. The more ways you know to prepare and serve mussels, the better, since they’re a food that should regularly show up on your plate. Why? Mussels are nutrient-dense morsels filled with B vitamins, selenium, zinc, magnesium and manganese. You don’t need to eat a ton of mussels, or other shellfish, to get a healthy serving of nutrients. So share this batch of pickled mussels with friends, or cut the recipe in half for a smaller serving.

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Primal Furikake

Furikake is a Japanese seasoning made from dried fish (bonito), sesame seeds, dried seaweed, salt, sugar, and often msg. A Primal version is easy to make–simply drop the sugar and msg–and you have a versatile seasoning for just about everything.

The ratio of ingredients can be tailored to your own taste, so simply use this furikake recipe as a guide. This particular recipe adds plenty of nori, since you can’t go wrong with a lot of nori.

Lightly toasted sesame seeds add crunch and the bonito flakes add an irreplaceable salty, umami flavor. Most grocery stores these days sell bonito flakes, or it can be ordered online. Bonito is air-dried, aged, and shaved tuna.

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