Category: Pork

Pork Chops in Creamy Turmeric Sauce

Pork Chops in Creamy Turmeric Sauce is a spicy (but not overly hot), sweet, tangy dish. It has complex flavor but very simple preparation. The sauce is also really versatile and likely to taste just as good over chicken, beef, or seafood. This is the type of recipe you’ll make again and again.

Turmeric lends its deep yellow color and the earthy, peppery flavor often tasted in curries. It also adds a slew of potential health benefits to your meal. Coconut milk, lime, cilantro and jalapeño are the other major flavors, coming together in a bold and plate-licking good sauce.

Read More

Crispy Carnitas

As if slow-cooked, tender, succulent pork wasn’t tempting enough, carnitas takes it one step further by caramelizing the pork in its own fat until the outside is perfectly browned and crisp. The crispy, tender morsels of pork that come out of the oven are hard to resist; it’s not unusual to eat so much meat right out of the pan that you’re full before the carnitas make it to the table.

Cooking meat that is both tender and crispy might sound tricky but the only trick to making carnitas is getting out of the way so the meat can cook itself. The less you intervene, the better. Seasoned pork is braised in a pot of water until the meat is tender and the water is gone. Then the pork fat takes over, essentially frying the meat into a crispy, fatty, salty masterpiece.

Read More

Primal Cassoulet

Cassoulet is often thought of as a massive undertaking that requires days to cook. It’s also often assumed that cassoulet can’t be made without beans. In this Primal version, neither is true. In a few hours you’ll have one of the meatiest meals imaginable. Incredibly rich and hearty with layers of different flavors, this is a meal not to be missed.

Cassoulet is made with all kinds of meat and can get a little pricey, depending on what you choose. This recipe is mid-range, as it blends pork shoulder and sausage, duck, and bacon. You can go all out and use more duck or even duck confit. You can scale back and add more pork shoulder and no duck at all. Or, you can use lamb if you want.

Read More

Bacon Brussels Sprouts with Brown Butter Vinaigrette

Brown-butter vinaigrette and a generous garnish of bacon make this veggie side dish almost as satisfying as a main course. Even so, the overall flavor is surprisingly light refreshing, thanks to the crisp, tender texture of the Brussels sprouts and a generous squirt of lemon.

This recipe uses a quick and efficient cooking method that browns the outside of the sprouts while gently steaming the inside. The trick is leaving the Brussels sprouts undisturbed in a lidded pot on the stove for not much more than five minutes. It’s so much faster than roasting Brussels sprouts in the oven and also prevents the wet-sponge texture that makes overcooked Brussels sprouts so unappealing.

Read More

Spiced Pork and Butternut Squash with Sage

Spiced Pork and Butternut Squash with Sage is the perfect meal for a chilly day, not only because it’s hearty and comforting but also because the blend of autumnal spices warms the belly.

Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice and ginger aren’t just for pumpkin pie. This blend of spices also makes a delicious spice rub for pork. Pumpkin (or squash) doesn’t have to be left out entirely. In this recipe, butternut squash is roasted to crispy perfection and served alongside the braised pork with a garnish of brown butter and sage.

You can mix the spices together yourself, or to save time just use Pumpkin Pie spice blend from the store. Once seasoned, the pork simmers in broth for a half hour or so until tender. That same broth is mixed with coconut milk and quickly reduced into a savory sauce.

Read More

Shortcut BBQ Ribs

Sharing a recipe for pork ribs is risky business. First, there’s the matter of flavoring the meat. Is a rub, a marinade, or a sauce the superior flavoring method, or maybe some combination of the three? And forget about finding a rub that all rib lovers agree on. There are hundreds of rub blends, all slightly different from the others, with each cook claiming their spice rub is the best.

Once you finally commit to a seasoning method, then you’ve got to cook the ribs. This is the part that can be really intimidating. Ribs can be cooked on a regular grill, but serious rib lovers invest in a smoker. Cooking ribs can easily take half the day, most of it spent slowly grilling, flavoring and obsessively coaxing the ribs to tender, smoky perfection.

Read More

Latest Posts