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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Pork

Bacon Trail Mix

Trail mix is usually a blend of sweet and salty ingredients, but it doesn’t have to be. This trail mix is savory all the way, combining roasted nuts and seeds with crispy bits of bacon and the delicious lard it renders.

Here, cashews, almonds and pumpkin seeds are flavored with coconut aminos, smoked paprika and a pinch of cayenne – but you can use your own favorite nut/seed combination. It’s also easy to imagine adding some finely chopped, fresh rosemary or other spices to the mix.

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Salami Vinaigrette

Chorizo vinaigrette doesn’t have a lot of eye appeal, but the garlicky pork flavor is even better than bacon on a spinach salad. Add mushrooms, hard boiled egg and warm caramelized red onion to wilt the greens and the salad is plenty appetizing, even without a gorgeous dressing.

While it’s not a good idea to dress every salad with vinaigrette made from cured meat, this recipe only uses 2 ounces of high-quality salami and delivers a whole lot of flavor. If you’re spinach adverse, or vegetable adverse for that matter, maybe a drizzle of chorizo vinaigrette will help the veggies go down. Chorizo vinaigrette is also delicious over roasted vegetables, sautéed greens of any kind (and grilled seafood).

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Hot and Sour Soup

Hot and sour soup, with its bracing spicy and sour flavor, tastes intuitively like food that will give your immune system a boost. At the very least, it’ll warm your belly and provide a satisfying meal, and with this recipe, no take-out menu is needed.

You can choose to seek out authentic ingredients (like lily buds and cloud ear fungus) or simply go with dried shiitake mushrooms. Likewise, ingredients like soy sauce, sugar and red rice vinegar can be replaced with coconut aminos and plain rice vinegar. This recipe also nixes tofu and cornstarch, resulting in a soup that isn’t traditional but delicious nonetheless.

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Primal Egg McMuffin

Some mornings, nothing hits the spot like a breakfast sandwich. Skip the fast food drive-through and doughy English muffin and instead make yourself this wholesome protein-packed Primal Egg McMuffin.

Eggs, with no other ingredients added, can easily be made into “English muffins” by using a biscuit cutter as a mold. Add a basic burger (seasoned like breakfast sausage, if you like) and a strip of bacon and breakfast is served.

A pound (450 g) of ground meat and a dozen eggs will make 6 sandwiches. If you’re making just one or two breakfast sandwiches, plan to use about 2.5 ounces (70 g) of ground meat, 2 eggs and 1 strip of cooked bacon for each sandwich. However, the sandwiches keep fairly well in the fridge for a few days so don’t hesitate to make a bigger batch for grab-and-go eating in the morning.

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Pancetta with Halibut and Asparagus

If something akin to “meat butter” sounds good to you, then head to your favorite local (or online) butcher shop and ask for pancetta, guanciale or lardo. All three are fatty cuts of pork – with an emphasis on fatty – that are dry cured with salt, herbs and spices.

Guanciale comes from the jowl, lardo comes from the back and pancetta comes from the belly. The long curing time (usually a couple months or so) means these seriously tasty slabs of mostly fat marbled with a little meat can be eaten raw. This is usually done by draping very thin slices of pancetta, guanciale or lardo over cooked meat, fish or vegetables, so it melts like butter. Meaty, salty, extremely rich butter.

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Slow Cooker Harissa Stew

Remember this delicious harissa lamb chop recipe? Take the recipe’s advice and also try harissa – a spicy North African condiment you can make at home with dried chiles, garlic, coriander, cumin, caraway and olive oil – as a rub for other types of meat like pork or beef. This recipe for slow cooker harissa stew guides the way.

In this recipe, harissa gives the stew meat complex, spicy flavor but the stew isn’t overly hot. However, if the moderate level of spiciness is still too hot for you, then cool the stew down by adding extra coconut milk at the end. If the stew isn’t spicy enough, then use leftover harissa as a condiment served with the stew.

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