Category: Eggs

Artichoke Deviled Eggs with Capers

Today’s guest post is an original recipe from my eldest, Devyn Sisson! Devyn is hard at work writing her first cookbook, Kitchen Intuition. In the meantime, check her out on Instagram for more recipes and kitchen tips.

I’m Devyn, aka, The Intuitive Chef, aka, Ms. Kitchen Intuition. Whatever alias I go by, “Dev” is always a good fallback. I just received my Masters in Spiritual Psychology, started writing a cookbook called Kitchen Intuition, and recently completed an integrative nutrition program.

Although I’ve learned from cookbooks, the trusty Food Network, and amazing chefs along my journey, I’ve always trusted my intuition when it comes to cooking, paying close attention to my body and taste buds to create strange, delicious, new, exciting recipes that I get to test out on my brave friends and family. And I’d like to share one of those intuitive variations with you today.

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Dulse “Bacon” and Eggs

Dulse, a type of red seaweed with high amounts of magnesium and calcium, has gotten some attention for tasting like bacon from the sea. Is it just media hype, or is it possible that dulse (pronounced duhls) really does taste like meaty, salty, fatty bacon?

Dried, whole leaf dulse can be eaten right out of the bag. It’s a bit chewy, tastes very salty, a little smoky and has that fresh-from-the-ocean seaweed flavor. When dulse is heated in a skillet with a little oil, it changes. The texture gets crispy, the seaweed flavor fades and the smokiness get stronger. It does indeed have some bacon-like qualities.

Even so, if you expect the dulse to taste exactly like bacon you’ll be disappointed. There is nothing like bacon…except bacon. But if you taste pan-fried dulse with a forkful of scrambled eggs and an open mind, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how well the smoky, salty flavor pairs with eggs. It’s not exactly like traditional eggs and bacon, but it’s a breakfast that’s good in its own right.

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Winter Squash, Leek and Chard Frittata

A frittata is the perfect meal any time of day, cold or hot, eaten with a knife and fork or with your hands. It’s the type of dish a person is tempted to use as a receptacle for leftovers, throwing in bits of meat and cooked vegetables, wilted herbs and an old knob of cheese. It’s hard to go wrong with a frittata, but if you want to go really, really right, this is the recipe.

The sweet and earthy flavors of winter squash, leeks and Swiss chard swirl together here in a frittata with a creamy, custard-like texture. The secret to the heavenly texture is full-fat dairy; without it, frittatas often have the texture of a kitchen sponge. Dairy isn’t for everyone, but if you tolerate dairy well, then there’s no reason to abstain. Full-fat dairy has more than just rich, delicious flavor to offer.

In this frittata recipe, crème fraiche adds amazing flavor and texture, although the same amount of yogurt, cream, or grated cheese can be substituted. And if this frittata has too many veggies for you and not enough meat, then go ahead and add some prosciutto or cooked bacon. You won’t be sorry.

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Pork Debris

Pork Debris is a brunch dish that’s usually a happy accident. A pork shoulder is roasted the day before for dinner, there happens to be leftovers, so why not fry the pork up with an egg for breakfast the next morning? However, there’s nothing wrong with making Pork Debris a deliberate meal, either. As in, a pork shoulder goes into the Crock Pot at bedtime so you can wake up to the aroma of slow cooked pork for brunch.

Pork Debris is a great recipe when you’re having people over for brunch and don’t feel like making much of an effort. The food basically cooks itself; you just have to fry a few eggs to throw on top. It’s a big, satisfying meal that will keep you well fueled through the afternoon.

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Spanish Fried Eggs

There’s only one reason to fry an egg in very hot extra virgin olive oil, and it’s a good one. This type of fried egg is often called “Spanish style” and there’s no arguing that it’s not delicious. The edges are so crispy, they shatter in your mouth. The white is soft and pillow-like and the yolk is warm and runny. The egg needs nothing more than salt (and maybe a dash of hot sauce) to be a memorable meal.

Once you’ve tasted a Spanish fried egg, you might never want to go back to rubbery, bland fried eggs again. But then there’s that issue of high heat oxidizing extra virgin olive oil, making it a poor choice for high heat cooking. Or is it?

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Slow Baked BLT Frittata

A frittata is a meal suitable for any time of day. Served alone for breakfast or with a side salad for lunch or dinner, it’s a step up from scrambled eggs and less fussy than an omelet.

Frittatas are generally shoved under the broiler for quick cooking and therein lies the only problem with a frittata. Too often, the eggs are dry and bland. But if you give a frittata a little more time, letting it bake slowly in low heat, the eggs are soft and custardy, but still firm enough to slice. It’s a welcome improvement.

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