Category: Recent Articles

What is PEMF Therapy?

In today’s world, we are constantly being exposed to electromagnetic fields, which tends to make people nervous. Who hasn’t heard concerns about EMFs and their potential health harms? We’re supposed to keep our cell phones away from our heads, turn the wifi off at night, avoid living under big power lines. 

So it would make sense if you were wary of PEMF therapy. In both cases, the “EMF” stands for electromagnetic field (the P standing for pulsed). But while just-EMF is supposed to be harmful (although the degree to which we need to worry is still up for debate), the pulsed kind is supposed to offer wide-ranging benefits. What gives?

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Are Canned Vegetables Healthy?

I’m lucky to live in warm climates with year-round access to fresh produce, but not everyone can pop over to their local farmer’s market or co-op whenever they want and grab the ingredients for a big-ass salad. Farm-to-table cuisine is great, the Primal ideal even, but the reality is that cooking with fresh, local ingredients requires access and time to shop and prepare food that not everyone enjoys, not always. Many people rely on preserved food for much or all of the year to meet their meat and produce needs, “preserved” meaning frozen, canned, dried, or fermented.

Whenever the topic of canned food comes up, I inevitably get questions about whether canned vegetables are nutritious, safe, or even Primal. (And I inevitably get comments about how we don’t need vegetables at all, which I discuss in my Definitive Guide to the carnivore diet.) Sure, Grok wouldn’t have eaten canned vegetables. But modern humans spend almost every minute of every day engaging with technology our ancestors couldn’t have imagined, from highly engineered mattresses topped with cooling pads to regulate our sleep temperature to air fryers to whatever device you’re reading this post on right now.

So I’m not too concerned about drawing some Primal line in the sand at food canning. The other questions are important, though. How does canned food stack up to fresh or frozen?

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Keto-friendly Vegetables

When the keto diet first skyrocketed in popularity in the late 2010s, it quickly gained a reputation as the “bacon and butter” diet. Vegetables might appear on one’s plate as a small side of spinach or, more likely, cauliflower masquerading as everything from rice to pizza crust to wings. By and large, the focus was on limiting consumption to “keto vegetables” while focusing mainly on increasing fat intake. (I’m talking mainstream keto, mind you, not the Primal Keto Reset approach.) This, as you’d expect, led to no end of pearl-clutching from mainstream medical professionals and the popular media, who quickly branded keto as a dangerous fad diet, a heart attack in the making. It was true that many early adopters of keto went hard on butter, cream, cheese, bacon, and other high-fat foods, probably as an understandable backlash against the low-fat diet dogma that dominated the previous four decades. Some people still do, I’m sure. However, I think most keto folks now understand that they cannot (or should not, anyway) live on butter alone. At least in more forward-thinking health circles, contemporary keto looks less bacon-and-butter and more like a lower-carb version of the Primal Blueprint way of eating, complete with bountiful salads and larger servings of protein. Personally, I’m all for keto eaters embracing a wide array of produce (keto-carnivore diets notwithstanding). At some point, though, the carb question comes into play. By definition, keto requires you to limit your carbohydrate intake to keep glucose and insulin low enough to facilitate ketogenesis. All vegetables contain carbohydrates, some more than others. You can’t eat unlimited amounts of vegetables, especially the higher-carb ones, if you want to stay in ketosis all the time.  So how do you decide which ones are best?  What Vegetables Are Best for Keto? In order to achieve ketosis, most people need to limit carbohydrate intake to a maximum of 30 to 50 grams per day. Hence, the best vegetables to include on a keto diet are the ones that deliver the most nutrients with the fewest carbs. That sounds straightforward, but in practice, it can be hard to know where to draw the line.  The internet is rife with lists that sort foods into discrete “allowed on keto” and “not allowed on keto” categories. They mean well—and they do help simplify the often confusing transition from SAD eating to keto—but they lack nuance. No food will knock you out of ketosis in a single bite. There are no “bad” vegetables. There are only serving sizes and carbohydrate content and fiber. Why does fiber matter? Because fiber is not absorbed into the bloodstream and converted into glucose. It’s counted as a carbohydrate, but it does not contribute to the glucose-induced insulin spike you want to minimize on keto. Fiber, especially the soluble type, is mostly just food for your gut microbes. From a ketosis perspective, fiber is neutral.  And in vegetables, especially the leafy and above-ground non-starchy varieties, much of their carb content is actually fiber, meaning their glucose/insulin impact … Continue reading “Keto-friendly Vegetables”

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 204

Research of the Week

Less autophagy, more heart disease.

Donating blood might be one way to lessen the risk of Parkinson’s.

Ketones may help chemotherapy patients (again).

Even if aspartame doesn’t increase anxiety in humans as it does in rodents, what do you have to lose by using stevia or monk fruit instead?

The more boosters a person had, the greater their risk of getting COVID.

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Keto Chicken Parmesan

There’s nothing more comforting than the rich tomato flavor of a classic Italian dish. However, those regularly practicing a keto lifestyle or starting a Keto Reset Diet may wonder if homestyle Italian cuisine is out of reach. This delicious keto chicken parmesan recipe proves that you don’t have to leave your comfort food favorites behind while traveling the keto path.

Our recipe substitutes Primal Kitchen Roasted Garlic Marinara for the laborious, day-long sauce that typically accompanies traditional chicken parmigiana, making for a quick and easy weeknight meal. We prefer cooking our chicken parmesan in a cast-iron pan for flavor and the hemoglobin iron boost, but you can use any oven-safe pan. Serve alone, with pan-roasted vegetables, or atop keto-friendly noodles.
How to make keto chicken parmesan
First, use a food processor or blender to pulverize the pork rinds into a coarse flour. Mix the pork rind powder in a bowl or dish with the almond flour, garlic powder, oregano, salt and pepper. Whisk your eggs in another bowl or dish. Dredge each cutlet one at a time in the egg mixture, allow the excess egg to drip off, then dredge the cutlet on both sides in the flour mixture. Set each cutlet aside and repeat with the rest of them.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat the olive oil in a large oven-safe skillet on your stovetop over medium-high heat. Once hot, place the cutlets in the pan and sear for 4-5 minutes on each side. Depending on the size of your pan, you may need to sear the chicken in batches. Don’t crowd the pan or else you won’t get a nice crust on the chicken. After you have seared the chicken, place all of the cutlets in the pan. Place the pan in the oven until the internal temperature of the thickest cutlet reads 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Pour the roasted garlic marinara sauce on top of each cutlet and place the pan back into the oven for 3-5 minutes.

Take the pan out of the oven and sprinkle the chicken with the cheese. Increase the oven temperature to 450 degrees. Place the skillet back into the oven until the cheese is melted and browned. You can also use the broil function of your oven. Remove from the oven and top with black pepper and oregano and basil.

Serve with your favorite veggie side. We like simple roasted or steamed broccoli, sauteed zucchini, kale or spinach, or spaghetti squash.

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How to Handle Youth Sports as a Parent

My kids are all grown up now, but from talking to friends and colleagues with younger kids, it’s become clear that youth sports has become too serious. Kids compete too much and too early. They overspecialize in sports at too young an age, then get burnt out and stop loving the sport altogether. They spend too much time doing the same thing with the same movement patterns. It monopolizes any free time the kids (and rest of family) have. And, perhaps most importantly, parents are too wrapped up in it all.

But it doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Kids love to play sports and need to move their bodies.

The foundation of all human movement is play—engaging in a broad spectrum of spontaneous moments, reacting to novel situations as they arise, associating movement with intrinsic reward and joy and pleasure. The problem is that the classic childhood culture of free play, which is how children have historically (and pre-historically) developed their ability to move through physical space and engage with the physical world, is disappearing from neighborhoods. Oftentimes the only chance a kid gets to move is by joining a competitive youth sports team.

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