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Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe

Chicago is known for its deep dish pizza. In Southern California, you have tacos on every corner. Philadelphia loves their cheesesteaks. And you know you’re in Nashville when every third restaurant claims they have the best Hot Chicken in town. If you’re looking for the crispy kick of hot chicken but you’re nowhere near Music City, we’ve got you covered. Our Nashville Hot Chicken recipe tastes just like the real thing, without the fried food hangover from oxidized frying oil and grain-based breading. Yes, it can be done. This recipe is fairly involved, but it’ll be worth it in the end. Not sure about the heat factor? You can adapt this recipe from slightly zingy to three-alarm fire. If you want to break a sweat, taste the coating mixture and the hot chicken sauce before you apply, and add more cayenne. If you want to scale back the spice level, simply reduce the cayenne pepper accordingly. If you want your chicken to have just a subtle zip, you can completely omit the cayenne. The chicken will still have a nice kick thanks to the Primal Kitchen® Buffalo Sauce. The best way to make the prep for this dish run smoothly is to set up a station with three coatings. Move the chicken like an assembly line down each coating mix. Some of the almond flour coating will clump up as you start dredging the chicken in it. That’s okay! Press these clumps into the chicken as you bread. It will create great texture for the final product. If you don’t have chicken thighs, you can use chicken breast. Follow the same directions, and bake at 400 degrees instead. You can also lightly spray the chicken with a spritz of Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Spray prior to baking to prevent the chicken from drying out. We used coconut sugar in the sauce since it melts with heat and helps the sauce come together. If you’d prefer to use a sugar substitute, your best bet may be a liquid sweetener, like a monk fruit extract based sweetener, but we have not tested this substitution. Here’s how to make it. Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe Ingredients 1 lb. boneless chicken thighs 1 cup almond flour 7 Tbsp tapioca starch ? cup coconut milk (or other full-fat milk) ¼ cup Primal Kitchen Buffalo Sauce 1 Tbsp coconut flour 1 tsp lemon juice ½ tsp paprika ½ tsp onion powder ½ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp salt ½ tsp black pepper ?-1/4 tsp cayenne pepper Butter lettuce or iceberg lettuce Pickles Sauce 1.5 Tbsp Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil 3 Tbsp Primal Kitchen Buffalo Sauce 3 Tbsp water 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp sweetener ¼ tsp cayenne pepper ¼ tsp chili powder ¼ tsp garlic powder ¼ tsp salt Directions Pound the chicken between two pieces of parchment paper until they are of even thickness. Set up three containers or shallow dishes. In the first, mix together two tablespoons of tapioca starch and one … Continue reading “Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe”

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Weekly Link Love—Edition 87

Research of the Week
Yoga promotes stress resilience.

Adipose tissue is limited by the number of embryonic progenitor cells.

Relying only on antibody testing may not capture everyone with coronavirus immunity.

Birds who swallow fish eggs whole may deposit them intact and viable into isolated lakes.

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The Definitive Guide to Cholesterol

Contrary to what we’ve been told, cholesterol didn’t evolve to give us heart disease. It’s not here to kill us. The actual roles of cholesterol in the body include insulating neurons, building and maintaining cellular membranes, participating in the immune response, metabolizing fat soluble vitamins, synthesizing vitamin D, producing bile, and kick-starting the body’s synthesis of many hormones, including the sex hormones. Without cholesterol, it’s true that we wouldn’t have heart disease, but we also wouldn’t be alive.

Given all the work cholesterol has to do, the liver is careful to ensure the body always has enough, producing some 1000-1400 milligrams of it each day. Dietary cholesterol is a relative drop in the bucket. And besides, the liver has sensitive feedback mechanisms that regulate cholesterol production in response to how much you get from your diet. Eat more cholesterol, make less in the liver. Eat less, make more in liver.

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Ask a Health Coach: Sleep, Weight Loss Stalls, and Skipping the Gym

How bad is working and eating late at night? Wondering why you’re not losing weight? And what if you don’t want to go back to the gym? In this week’s edition of Ask a Health Coach, Erin is back to answer more of your questions. Keep them coming in the comments below or over in our Mark’s Daily Apple Facebook Group.
Jacob asked:

“My nighttime habits are the worst. I stay up too late working, then I’m hungry and go looking for a snack at 1 or 2 am. I don’t think I should be working and eating that late, but how bad is it really?”
Your intuition is spot on here, Jacob. The late-night artificial light. The late-night insulin spike. The stress of a disrupted sleep cycle. It all comes down to your circadian rhythm, which as reiterated in this study, can lead to a myriad of metabolic ramifications. For those not familiar with circadian rhythm, it’s basically your internal, 24-hour cycle of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes.

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What Is Monk Fruit Sweetener, and Is It Keto?

When you give up sugar, that doesn’t mean you have to give up sweet treats. You can find natural ways to satisfy your sweet tooth without spiking your blood sugar, and that doesn’t mean you have to resort to dangerous artificial sweeteners. Monk fruit is a keto community favorite ingredient to sweeten recipes, but what exactly is it, and where does it come from? Is there any research behind monk fruit? And how do we compare the various formulations next to each other in the supermarket aisle? Let’s break this down. What Is Monk Fruit? We’ve covered stevia, yacon syrup, allulose, and Swerve, but what about another popular choice in the growing selection of natural sweeteners — monk fruit? Known as Luo Han Guo in its native southern China, monk fruit (Siraitia grosvenorii) first found acclaim in the records of 13th century Luo Han Buddhist monks. The monks valued the natural sweetness of the fruit and made it their mission to cultivate the vines through the centuries. Today, most monk fruit cultivation still occurs in the misty mountains of China’s Guangxi province and a few surrounding areas, where the conditions are just right to grow and harvest the small, orange-sized fruits. Monk fruit belongs to the cucurbit family alongside squash, cucumber, and watermelon. Fresh off the vine, the mini melons have a bitter outer rind encasing a sweet edible pulp and seeds. But unless you know someone who’s managed to cultivate monk fruit in their garden, you’re unlikely to eat a fresh monk fruit. The flesh degrades quickly, meaning most manufacturers dry monk fruit or process it so that it will make it to market. Most monk fruit finds its way to American shelves as a concentrated natural sweetener. As always, the nature of that sweetener can vary markedly depending on how it was processed. Instantly download your Keto Reset Diet Recipe Sampler Is Monk Fruit Keto? An average serving of pure monk fruit extract contains virtually no carbs, calories or sugars, which makes it a great choice to sweeten keto desserts and drinks. It derives almost all of its sweetness from a group of antioxidants called mogrosides, with mogroside V having a sweetness 250 times that of table sugar. To put that sweetness in perspective, most people consider just 1/64 of a teaspoon of monk fruit extract to taste as sweet as a full teaspoon of table sugar. But to get this natural “zero calorie” sweetener, much of the natural compounds in the fruit are lost. Most producers treat “pure” monk fruit sweeteners  to remove off-flavors, then they dry it to remove other sulfurous volatiles. Finally, it gets homogenized and pasteurized. The resulting extract is very different from its original state, slightly undermining its purported status as a natural sweetener. Other less processed natural monk fruit sweeteners provide a more wholesome version of the original fruit, but with the arguable downside of containing a small amount of glucose and fructose. More carbs also tend to mean fewer mogrosides, and … Continue reading “What Is Monk Fruit Sweetener, and Is It Keto?”

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The Health Benefits of Turmeric, and How to Get More of It

It may not share cinnamon’s popularity, but turmeric is another spice with powerful culinary and medicinal qualities that deserves our attention. Turmeric, known officially as curcuma longa and historically as Indian saffron, is a rhizome (root) of the ginger family. Its horizontal root system is dug up, baked, and ground into a bright orange powder, which then goes into any number of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and Southeast Asian dishes. Pretty much every curry you come across anywhere, for example, includes a generous portion of turmeric. Common yellow mustard also includes turmeric, mostly as a food colorant. Recently, the health benefits of turmeric have come to light, and people are looking for more ways to get more turmeric into their diets.

Turmeric imparts a unique flavor: slightly bitter and a bit spicy, with a mustard-like scent. Upon tasting a dab of turmeric powder by itself for the first time, one is reminded of curries and other Asian stews. It’s a bit of an “Aha!” moment – when you taste it, you can finally put your finger on the earthy flavor that’s so common in your favorite dishes from around the world. Turmeric itself is actually fairly mild and unassuming, so using it as a solitary spice won’t turn every dish into a curry bonanza – in case you were worried.

In this article, I’ll cover the health benefits of turmeric, the science behind it, and how to get more of it.

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