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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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March 10 2019

Low-Carb & Keto Chayote “Apple” Crisp

By Mark Sisson
6 Comments

Chayote squash is having its day in the sun as of late, but it’s been used for centuries in Latin American cooking and baking. The chayote squash (also known as mirliton squash) is a mild-tasting, relatively low carb, and versatile fruit with a good dose of vitamin C. Because of its hardness, you’ll definitely want to eat it cooked, but the end result will be worth it: a tender but slightly crisp fruit that bears a resemblance to pear or jicama and that takes on the particular flavors of any recipe—sweet or savory.

Note: there’s a little extra prep involved with chayote, but we think the additional few minutes are well worth the approximately 50 grams of carbs spared (full recipe).

Time In the Kitchen: 20 minutes

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

Filling

  • 5 cups chayote squash
  • 1 tbsp cream of tartar
  • 5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup Swerve (or equivalent of favorite sugar-free sweetener (e.g. monk fruit, etc.)

Crumble Topping

 

Instructions:

Preheat oven 350 ºF/175 ºC

Prep the squash. (This video has a good rundown of the process.) In a nutshell, cut the top inch off the fruit and let the liquid bubble up on the exposed flesh of the fruit. Rub the cut top piece over the exposed area for a full minute to draw up and out more liquid. This will create a froth as pictured. After the full minute, wipe off this froth with a clean paper towel. (Although the liquid/froth is completely safe, it may cause a mild tingly feeling if you get it on your fingers.)

Cut the fruit in half and remove the seed, along with the white flesh directly around it.

Cut squash into 1/4 inch slices.

Place in pot along with cinnamon, arrowroot or cream of tartar, lemon juice and sweetener. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes so that the squash starts to become tender.

Pour into ramekins.

Put all the crumble topping ingredients into a food processor and pulse until the butter is well incorporated and it looks good and crumbly.

Pour over top of squash.

Bake 30 minutes (or 45 minutes if baking as an 8-inch pie)

Nutritional Information (per serving)

  • Calories: 345
  • Net Carbs: 8 grams
  • Fat: 28 grams
  • Protein: 12 grams
TAGS:  Keto Recipes

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6 thoughts on “Low-Carb & Keto Chayote “Apple” Crisp”

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  1. Wow that’s an interesting fruit/squash. I like the idea of using a sticky protein like collagen to create a crumble too. I’ll have to visit a Latin market to see if I can pick up some chayote squash. Thanks for the idea.

  2. Chayote squash is actually my favorite but I have a finite knowledge when it comes to preparing it as a dish.

  3. For anyone contemplating cooking with chayote, once you have peeled the skin off, it is so slippery that you can barely hold onto it. Paradoxically, handling the peeled fruit will make your hands sticky, like you have tree sap on them.

    My wife makes a delicious soup that is chunks of chayote with meatballs she makes out of several ingredients, of which the main ones are ground pork and shrimp. I’m pretty certain there is also garlic and shallots in there. Probably some white pepper either in the meatballs or in the soup itself. We simply call it “chayote soup”.

  4. That’s one squash I have been tempted to grow. The fruit is the seed so you plant the whole fruit to get it to grow.

  5. Growing up in south Louisiana, we had mirliton in casseroles with shrimp (most often) or pork sausage (also yummy). It was a staple for holiday meals. Leave off the breadcrumb topping, and it’s paleo.

  6. I love chayote squash–I eat lots of it when in Guatemala–but where can I find it in the states?