Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

Tell Me More
Stay Connected
November 10 2018

Keto Turkey Gravy

By Editorial Team
4 Comments

Among the best parts of slow roasting meat are the delicious drippings. Rich, savory and flavorful liquid gold… To discard it, we’d suggest, borders on criminal.

While there’s nothing wrong with enjoying drippings on their own, most of us grew up enjoying the creamy texture of gravy on meats and vegetables. For some, it’s an indispensable element in a real holiday meal. And there’s no reason to deprive yourself if gravy is your thing. Even if you’re living keto, this recipe keeps your commitment. Most of all, it feels and tastes like indulgence itself. 

Serving: 4

Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups turkey drippings, bone broth, or stock
  • ½ cup heavy whipping cream
  • 4 tablespoons butter or ghee
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon arrowroot powder

Instructions:

Combine cream, butter, broth/drippings in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce to simmer for 10–15 minutes. Add arrowroot powder, salt, and pepper. Stir until gravy thickens and reduces down to consistency of your liking.

Nutritional Info (per serving):

  • Calories: 693
  • Carbs: .8 grams
  • Fat: 75 grams
  • Protein: 0 grams

If you'd like to add an avatar to all of your comments click here!

4 thoughts on “Keto Turkey Gravy”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Gravy is a situation where I’m happy to pull the container of flour out of the back of a pantry and make a nice roux.

    I’ve used the arrowroot approach and I don’t think it works as well.

    1. Just this week I used arrowroot directly in place of the flour when creating a roux, equal parts arrowroot to butter. We brought to a decidedly non-primal “friendsgiving” and not a single person could tell a difference. The texture and consistency was nearly identical to a flour-based gravy.

  2. I don’t think these combined ingredients have enough calories to equal the 693 calories per serving (4 totaling almost 3,000 calories in approximately 3 cups of this stuff…) your nutritional information claims… And the fact that it claims to have zero protein when using bone or turkey broth… I am Jack’s raging confusion……? And that “.8” grams of carbs?

  3. Can I sub potato starch for the arrowroot, since I already have that in the pantry?