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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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February 23 2018

Primal Starter: Is Your Night Routine Encouraging Fat Storage?

By Mark Sisson
6 Comments

Inline_Live-Awesome-645x445-04“Today, instead of experiencing a mellow and graceful transition to sleepiness during the evening hours, our exposure to artificial light after sunset kicks off a chain reaction of adverse hormonal events. Artificial light and digital stimulation after dark suppress the release of melatonin, the hormone that makes us feel sleepy in the evening (a process known as dim light melatonin onset, or DLMO). In tandem, we experience a spike in the primary stress hormone cortisol. Initially, cortisol floods the bloodstream with glucose, giving us a ‘second wind’ to stay awake and finish our emails or Netflix series binge.”

Thus, if you stress yourself in this manner every night, chronically elevated evening cortisol can bind with the appetite receptors in the brain and trigger you to consume high-calorie foods. Late nights also dysregulate ghrelin (spiking appetite) and leptin (promoting fat storage). Indeed, our digestive systems also have a circadian rhythm, and eating late at night can mess things up…making it likely that you’ll eat beyond feeling satisfied and store those calories as fat.”

—From The Keto Reset Diet

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6 thoughts on “Primal Starter: Is Your Night Routine Encouraging Fat Storage?”

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  1. I worry about the long-term ramifications of kids and digital stimulation in the evening hours. Many of my students report feeling tired because they stay up all night playing video games! If I were a parent I would insist that my child’s room be technology free after 7pm. However, I can hear many parents responding that this would be unrealistic. Is it??

    1. I don’t think it would be unrealistic, at least while kids are still fairly young. Kids get harder to control when they are in their teens, and too many parents would rather cave to the pressure than stand firm against the complaints. Parents also need to be united. The battle is already lost if one parent doesn’t care.

    2. I agree, no tech after 7 is ideal. However, teens have a way of getting around that after we fall asleep. I have the rule No Tech after 8, not easy but he can’t fall asleep until 11 because he doesn’t believe me and sneaks.

    3. maybe schools more exhausting then games? maybe games on the computer help advance their thinking and critical responses better then other things do? a good violent or creative game where they are constantly tested and attacked by other kids playing the same game in a virtual environment does work the mind and creates good strong intellectual advances perhaps? computers advance those who use them long enough, faster better creative responses sometimes, othertimes simply better free open communication that no male has openly shared historically because it isnot socially or hormonally acceptable to talk about feelings and emotional things?

  2. I thought it was only blue light? Maybe I should go to sleep at 4PM all winter, it will be easier than trying to knit by candlelight. No, seriously, I read that article 2 times and I still don’t see what I’m supposed to do. Stop any screen time 1 hour before bed? 2 hours? 3 hours? What I’m doing right now is using f.lux but maybe it’s not enough. Also, do I really need to start using candles? Because that’s what I understood I should do for optimal health.