Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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January 02 2019

How to Restart Keto

By Mark Sisson
47 Comments

Last month, I gave a heads up about what I’m calling the Keto Kickoff—a quick and comprehensive 7-day dive into the ketogenic diet, a pure distillation of the lessons contained in The Keto Reset Diet book. That starts next Monday (sign-up closes Sunday night 1/6/19), and it assumes, but does not require, an audience without any formal experience in the ketogenic diet.

What about a similar-but-different-enough population—those who have tried keto, stopped for any number of reasons, and want back on the wagon? Should those looking to restart keto do or know anything different?

First and foremost, the basics still apply. Anyone looking to restart keto should pay attention to all the stuff I’ve covered in previous posts and books and will be covering in the Keto Kickoff email series (so sign up today!). Going keto is going keto.

What’s the most important step someone trying to restart a ketogenic diet needs to follow before doing anything else? Identify why you fell off the wagon in the first place. Then address it.

That’s really what sets you apart from the average keto beginner—your preexisting hangups. If anything, you’ll have a better physiological response to the ketogenic diet because your body retains knowledge. Some of that metabolic machinery is still there, still functioning, once you shake off the rust.

But you do need to figure out and overcome what tripped you up the first place.

People have dozens of potential reasons for quitting keto. I can’t possibly cover them all, but I can address and offer solutions for the most common ones.

It Was Challenging Figuring Out How To Eat With Friends, Family, and Colleagues

The people who give this reason usually fall into one of two camps. Either they’re too agreeable and give in to peer pressure (imagined or real) at the drop of a hat, making it impossible to get into any sort of keto rhythm; or they’re too rigid, turning every social excursion with food into an epic battle of will that eventually breaks them. The former group needs to toughen up. The latter group needs to lighten up.

Avoid rigidity and timidity. Stand firm and be resolute in your convictions about what diet makes you feel best; don’t be afraid to say “no” or order a salad with four meat patties when everyone else is getting pizza. In the vast majority of these cases the only one making you feel awkward is yourself. Most people don’t care. And if they do care, it’s probably because they’re intrigued and want to know more. Besides, going keto isn’t such a foreign concept these days. You may even have secret compatriots present who are also restarting keto.

Stick it out for three or four weeks and then lighten up. Once you’ve re-established your ketogenic metabolism and achieved metabolic flexibility, it won’t hurt (that much) to drift in and out on special occasions. You should be able to bounce back relatively quickly after a dalliance with carbs at happy hour, or Thanksgiving, or a birthday party. Just try to stick to healthy Primal sources of carbs to make the transition that much easier.

It Stopped Working

Sometimes keto stops working. An understandable reaction is to stop doing keto. It’s not the ideal move, but it makes sense.

If you’re thinking about restarting keto after a hiatus, and the reason you stopped in the first place was that keto stopped working, you probably have some bad habits or misconceptions to overcome.

  • You ate too much fat. A common trajectory among keto dieters who plateau is that they overdo the fat. Early on in keto, anything you eat seems to promote weight loss. The extra fat in those early days even upregulates the fat-burning of your mitochondria, speeding up the keto adaptation process. You’re eating more fat than you ever have before, and you only seem to be growing more powerful. It’s a profound sensation. But as you keep eating more and more fat, you plateau. As you attempt your keto restart, remember that getting into ketosis is more about the carbs you don’t eat than the fat you do. Calories don’t stop counting on keto.
  • You ate too little protein. Protein absolutely can inhibit ketosis, but it takes more than you think. Ketosis is protein-sparing, but you still need to eat it. And some people can get away with far more protein than others and still remain firmly in ketosis. The oft-given blanket advice to “limit protein” can really throw some people for a loop and lead to keto “not working.” Too low a protein intake on keto can reduce performance in the gym, limit or even reverse muscle hypertrophy, increase appetite, and make it hard to construct a palatable meal. If that sounds like you, try eating a bit more protein when you do your keto restart.

It Felt Too Restrictive

Not to toot my own horn too much, but this is one of the main reasons why I developed the Primal Kitchen line. Having an arsenal of reliable, convenient, and most importantly healthy mayos, dressings, sauces, and marinades promotes dietary variability. You end up eating a wider range of meats, vegetables, and other keto-friendly foods when you can modify their taste and presentation by flipping open the top of a bottle of dressing or mixing in some mayo. Meal monotony is a deal breaker for many people on any diet, including keto.

It Was “Too Hard”

That’s about as vague a complaint as you can get, but it’s very common.  Going keto forces a totally new way of looking at your food, at your conception of energy, even your experience of the world. Your breath changes. Your grocery shopping routine changes. Three-quarters of the food at your favorite restaurant is suddenly off-limits. Then there’s the salt, potassium, and other electrolytes to worry about.

If you found keto to be just too hard to get a handle on, you’re not alone. Sign up for the Keto Kickoff, refresh your knowledge of the basics (and see what you were overlooking, if anything), get daily support, and do your keto restart right.

You Just Drifted Away

Things snowball, don’t they? You have a quarter of a donut at work because it’s just a quarter of a donut and it’s your favorite kind and it’s free. You get home and taste test the mac-and-cheese you made for your kids a few times, then finish their plate because, hey, it was only a couple more bites and refrigerated mac-and-cheese gets weird. Before you realize it, you’ve eaten refined carbohydrates every single day, haven’t lost a pound, and you can’t rightfully call yourself keto.

Keto drift happens, and it demands a restart. To prevent it from happening again, remember why you wanted to go keto in the first place:

For the fat loss…

For the improved energy…

For the metabolic flexibility…

For the freedom from hunger…

For the potential for a long, healthy, active life…

When you’re ready to get serious, get moving.

It Never Worked…As I Tried It

This is rare, but not inconceivable. Occasionally, a diet doesn’t work.

If keto truly doesn’t work for you, no matter how faithfully or optimally you implement it, don’t do it. Ketosis is still a good state to visit, so just be sure to implement some other method of entering ketosis even if you’re not going to restart the keto diet, whether it’s intermittent fasting, intense exercise (with precautions), caloric restriction, or simply not snacking all the time.

Do make sure you gave it a good three-week try, however, before concluding that “it doesn’t work for me.” That’s the minimum amount of time you need to know if it’s a good fit. If you didn’t give it three full and earnest weeks, sign up for the Keto Kickoff (opportunity for sign up closes January 6th!), and see what additional guidance and support can do for your process.

For those interested in beginning the new year with the Keto Reset Diet library of books, for a limited time all the original bonus gifts—ebooks, audio, video and Primal Kitchen discount codes—for each book (The Keto Reset Diet, The Keto Reset Cookbook, and the The Keto Reset Instant Pot Cookbook) are available with purchase again.

Thanks for reading today, everyone. Are you restarting keto? Trying it for the first time? Committing to another deep dive after a successful keto experience before? I’d love to hear your stories, questions and tips for all who are taking up keto in the new year.

TAGS:  Keto, keto-popular

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47 thoughts on “How to Restart Keto”

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  1. I did keto last year and really loved it – got to my goal weight, never felt unhappy or unsatisfied. BUT my cholesterol shot up by 50 points and it was borderline high to begin with. I’d love to do keto again, but that just scared me. Any thoughts?

    1. I’m not sure exactly what your lifestyle is like, but if you did not incorporate exercise into your regime your cholesterol may have been negatively affected. However, it could also be genetics or a number of other variables. Best bet would be to see your doctor and have a check-up with labs. Let your doctor know you are starting this diet and maybe have a follow up every month – 3 months to re-check your labs. They will obviously want to keep an eye on your cholesterol (assuming you were talking about HDL and not LDL) and it would be best to have other vitals monitored as well.

      Good luck!

    2. Were you still losing weight at the time? During weight loss it’s not uncommon for cholesterol to go up just because of the fat that is breaking down in your body.

    3. Interesting. That was my situation as well, though not by 50 points. After reading this post, I’m reminded that I most likely overdid the fat intake. Went from a half avocado to one full avocado on my salads, for one example. Probably overdoing it on the nuts too.

    4. Michelle, thanks for your comment. I’ll be doing a post on keto and cholesterol in the coming weeks. For now, I’d suggest getting a more detailed test than the average check-up offers. Particle size matters and is only measured in more comprehensive testing. More to come…

    5. Call me sceptical, but I don’t believe that the medical community has every proved that a better lipid profile translates to a better life – the paradigm is changing.
      My own life has improved dramatically eating bacon 3 meals a day (kidding, slightly) – no fog, more cost-effective, clean-burning, better, skiing, golf, workouts – just feels great all ’round. I can understand that it doesn’t work for everyone, but it has certainly worked for me.
      I have a coronary artery stent because of a blockage – something that happened before I discovered the glorious world of healthy fat, and since going Keto (mostly), my lipid profile has improved, by conventional standards.
      Who’d have thought ? – high (healthy) fat eating, and exercising less (but higher intensity) makes life so much more enjoyable.
      Sooo, enjoy life, and don’t worry so much about numbers, and remember – a lot of what doctors tell you to do makes them feel better, but doesn’t nessecarily make you better.
      Cheers,
      Dr. Nigel Aspinall,
      Emergency Physician

    6. Here are some simple, verifiable facts that should reframe the narrative on cholesterol…

      – Dietary cholesterol has little, or nothing, to do with blood cholesterol numbers.
      – Heart attacks occur more often in people with “normal” ldl cholesterol numbers.
      – Inflammation, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar and blood pressure are better predictors of heart health.
      – “High” cholesterol is a predictor of longevity (in certain populations).

      Bottom line: cholesterol is a proxy for something that we’re not even close to understanding.

    7. My ldl is high, and was high when I had been primal for a couple years. My doctor said that since my hdl was also high, my triclycerides and a1c was low, and I am within a normal weight range, that it is probably just genetic.

      I do know that if it is something you are concerned about, you can try a weight lifting program to put that cholesterol to good use. Try it for six months and get retested, I bet you’ll be surprised at the results.

  2. I think it’s worth noting that another reason for leaving the keto lifestyle is the ‘all or nothing’ nature that some folks (including myself) suffer from. I attribute this to one’s level of carb/sugar addiction. Trying to be ‘flexible’ is a sure-fire way for any addict to fall off the wagon – imagine the heroin addict just doing an occasional ‘hit’ to keep flexible. Carbohydrate addiction is really no different for myself and others in this deep end of the pool. Just a wee bite of…you should really just have a small piece, since it’s your birthday, etc. It is a very slippery slope, or even more like just falling off the edge of the cliff.
    Good luck to all of Mark’s followers in their keto reset and lifestyle journey!

  3. When I first went low carb it was great. I lost 50 lbs and had great energy and felt fantastic for the first time in my adult life. Couldn’t ever quite reach my goal weight though and last May I had a bout of acute thyroiditis. Dropped another 10lbs in about a week, then after a couple months started gaining unstoppably (I’m over 190 now when last winter I was floating around 170 ?)
    I haven’t been super strict about keto for a while because it just got so discouraging to see the number on the scale keep climbing no matter what I eat. But I think it’s probably worth trying again along with a couple other things that I am doing for thyroid health right now too.

  4. Hi Mark. One thing I have noticed with most cookbooks is that even though they have great recipes in them they are overly complex and fancy using ingredients that most people just don’t keep on hand.
    As an extremely busy single guy ( and this would likely apply to a lot of women as well ) I just don’t have the time or motivation to put into cooking. It seems that most cookbooks don’t concider those that work 12 to 14hr days 6 days a week or even more. I usually go with meals that take about 15mins make from thinking about eating to sitting down and eating. The single guys go to is usually something like steak and eggs or beer and pizza with a bit of vege thrown in here and there.
    I’d like to suggest a cookbook with extremely simple fast prep meals that can be used every day from breakfast to dinner and continue to do so day in day out.

    1. You nailed it. Too many ingredients, or sometimes “exotic” ingredients for a persons area. Many of them can’t be made ahead of time for freezing for later.

    2. Yeah absolutely Mark do a cookbook about throwing a steak in a pan.

    3. Exactly. I get up at 4:30 AM and am going until I get home at 5:30 PM, I don’t have time or energy to put into a 30 minute meal with some of the vital ingredients that I don’t have or even know they exist let alone have……. I have only a small amount of time to shop each week so I need to get things that have a good shelf life or refrigerator life. Not a single guy either.

    4. I also agree Eddie. Though I have found most cookbooks to be a basis for ideas that I tend to adapt or modify. Just tonight I cooked a bunch of chicken breasts and thighs. I sliced a half of an avocado over one then topped it with a slice of pepper jack cheese and threw it under the broiler for a few mins. My side was a stalk of celery filled with cream cheese (my go-to snack). That said, steak in a pan and some broccoli works too. Good luck!

    5. Have you checked out Mel Joulwan’s Well Fed cookbook? In it she shows people how to create several different types of meals out of a base of vegetables like spaghetti squash with a meat added plus spices/a sauce that can take the same dish from mexican to chinese. She also describes how to do a weekly ‘cookup’ to prepare ingredients for meals for the week. All her recipes are Whole30 approved too.

    6. LoL!!! My favorite fast keto meal is a bag of spinach thrown into a buttered pan with some burger! Or with some eggs and cheese! Done! 5 minutes, tops! And delicious, too!

    7. Reality is there are only some many hours in a week, priortization is king. Reducing everyday meal time prep means pre-prepping at some point. For example, washing and cutting veggies once purchased. Combine that with meal planning to reuse leftovers (if any) and to know when to prep beforehand. Cooking methods vary. A sous vide is a great set and forget method and can par cook meats to save time. Same with a pressure cooker, especially ones with a digital delay. Half sheet pan meals cooked in the oven are simple.

  5. I’m considering this based on reading Dr. Kruse’s book Epi-Paleo RX. I’m looking to change my diet in hopes it will help with my migraines and make me healthier, overall. I’m concerned with cholesterol as well, though…my current numbers are 74HDL/144LDL. Will Keto raise my LDL?

    1. Hi Angie, I found out that chocolate of any type gives me migraines. Stopped eating it over 20 years ago, havne’t had a migraine since. Sadly, I’ve noticed that many red wines are now incorporating ‘chocolate flavors, hues, essence etc’ in them, so I have to be really careful. Easter isn’t fun anymore 🙁 , but neither are migraines. Hope this helps 🙂

  6. Whether primal or keto, the reasons were the same: Nobody else in my family was on board, and sometimes it gets too tempting to jump off the wagon “just real quick, then I’ll get back on”.
    I know they work and work well. It will take lots of willpower to get back on and stay on track.

  7. My biggest problem is losing TOO much weight. I don’t see this addressed very often. How do I maintain (or gain!) weight while staying on a Keto diet? Maybe this would be worthy of an article?
    PS. I’m a big fan of your salad dressings and mayo. Thank you SO much for them!

    1. Eating your protein later in the day can help you eat more calories without filling up.

  8. When I first started with MDA years ago I was pretty much in ketosis and would go in and out here and there. I loved the energy and ability to go without hunger when eating wasn’t an option.
    However, life gets complicated. I noticed that fries, tator tots, a bite of this or that will ruin me. So now it’s NO BITES for me!
    My personal life had changed from wonderful to TRAGIC – losing parents, spouse, cat and gaining a sullen teen, being bullied by a superior. No matter what I did in ketosis helped me to not pack on the pounds, stress will do that, destroyed my sleep as well. I am dealing with the stress better now and MOVING on.
    I’m getting back on the horse this year/month/day.

  9. I went low carb 5 years ago, lost weight, felt great.But my cholesterol shot up to over 400. I had the VAP and most of the LDL was the big fluffy kind (and my HDL was 110) but my doc, who understands the nuances, said too much of even the good kind is still too much. Now I’m nearly 70. We sold our home & downsized, moved to a rural community which is nice and surrounded by nature, but a 30 mile round trip to the grocery store. Organic veggies and other things I used to get are hard to come by unless I drive 100 miles round trip. My husband died and all of these major life transitions have sapped me of the energy to do much food prep, etc. And as I got older, I could no longer tolerate foods I used to enjoy, like onion and garlic. Many foods give me a stomach ache or other discomfort so I end up eating plain foods and am allergic to wheat, corn (no great loss there!), mushrooms and some other foods. My diet is already so restrictive that I’m finding it impossible to work up the energy and will to go through keto flu again, and just to resist a few pleasurable carbs. I guess I’m trying to find a reason that works for me to make myself do this again and stick with it. Although I gained about 20 lbs, I wasn’t much overweight so while it would be nice to lose the 20 lbs, it’s not a big enough motivation right now.

  10. I went Keto last summer because I was anticipating a hip replacement surgery and had to remain involuntarily inactive until the surgery was over. It was great. Easy and effective. Lost @15 lbs in 6 weeks. Post surgery I was in pain and relying on my husbands cooking. Next thing I knew I was back where I started!
    Thanks for this post. Gonna get back on the wagon.

    1. By the way, I bought the Keto Reset book last

      Seems like we should be able to participate in the kick off

  11. Great way explanation on Keto diet, concept explained in very simple way. But, can let me know one thing. I have read somewhere that Ketosis may promote tumour cells ?

  12. Good morning Mark~
    I purchased your Keto Reset Book and am reading it now. I noticed that some of your recipes call for Almond flour. I have a sensitivity to almonds and am wondering what to use in its place?
    Also, Will being Keto help to balance my hormones?
    Thank you for your help~

    1. You can try coconut flour, but it’s much more absorbant so you may need to adjust quantities.

    2. I’d suggest the Elana’s Pantry site for nut-free keto recipes. You can sub any other nut- or seed-based flour for almond flour probably–ground sunflower seeds or hazelnuts would work for most things. Coconut flour is its own thing. Useful for keto, but worth looking up recipes specifically designed for using it.

  13. I fell off the wagon a couple years ago. I couldn’t run fifteen miles a week on the primal diet without feeling wasted, no matter how many sweet potatoes or coconut oil I ate. I lost a lot of hair and had worse insomnia. Also, I have this love affair with cheese…. I can’t resist a fresh mozzarella, aged provolone, or plain old cheddar on broccoli. Dairy definitely seems to cause me to gain weight, but my blood sugar levels and a1c are always great. Maybe I will try again, at least going grain and sugar free, and see where I end up.

  14. I have been paleo or keto with intermittent fasting since 2008 when I found Mark’s blog. Thanks Mark! I have lost over 125 pounds and am looking to get rid of the last 40 over the next 1-2 years.

    Last summer I was diagnosed with colon cancer, had significant surgery, got a temporary ileostomy, and was told to try to maintain my weight by eating a low-fiber (aka high carb) diet through 6 months of oral chemo (11/18 – 5/19). That’s not going to happen. I gave my ileostomy a few months to heal up and I know it’s ready for a better diet. I restarted keto and fasting this week.

    Keto is easy compared to trying to maintain weight with 5-6 small hi-carb meals a day diet combined with anti-diarrheal drugs and Metamucil.

  15. Looking forward to doing Keto again. My fall off the keto wagon was just giving up and giving in to old bad habits. I started going to the gym 5 days a week in addition to my other activities (hiking, cycling, Zumba), so this is getting me motivated for the Keto restart. My spouse had esophagus cancer 2 yrs ago and had his esophagus removed. His eating has completely changed and he needs to gain weight but loves his junk food and sugary snacks. (I swear I could hear the junk food calling my name while I slept). Would a Keto lifestyle help him gain weight?

  16. The worker bees should post the reset on reddit’s “keto” sub. Lots of newbies and there are almost a million subscribers.

  17. Keto has been my ideal diet since about 2010, but about a year ago I was diagnosed with multiple food allergies that really restrict my choices – including yeast (and most other fungi), olives/olive oil, eggs, crab, wheat, kidney beans, pineapple, vanilla, chocolate, and oregano. So I’ve spent a year evaluating the effect of these various foods to identify the worst offenders – yeast (and yeast extract) are the worst, and they are in practically EVERYTHING! Eggs and crab are off the menu, soft or aged cheese, most premade sauces, most italian food, etc. Since potatoes and rice are very safe for my gut I’ve drifted towards higher carb overall because it’s been really challenging to make safe, keto choices at any given moment when I just want to eat something that won’t make me sick so I can get back to work. I would love to be part of the Keto restart, but the required keto kit purchase will is full of sauces that have one or more of my allergic foods (eggs are in most of them). Is there another option to participate?

  18. How often do you think it’s good to do a keto re-set? Once you’ve made the metabolic machinery and feel great on keto or eating more healthy carbs, do you ever need to do a keto reset again?

  19. We just started the Keto reset, looking ahead to next week, one of the recipes is Slow Cooker Carnitas. My husband is allergic to pork, what type of beef would be best to use to get similar results to use throughout the week. Thanks!

  20. I am incredibly frustrated with my results (lack of) using Primal and Keto in my life. I have been living the Primal Blueprint for about 10 years. At first, my efforts were gradual, as we learned the about the program, by living and trying it, and then we got better and better and now, we are living it the closest we ever have, and have been for about 3 years. My problem is that I haven’t lost any fat or inches in years, and I am NOT at my ideal anything. Weight, size, strength, energy. I am motivated and want to change whatever it is that is holding me back, but I have no idea what that is. I have looked for answers, on marksdailyapple (of course), and many other places/people. Tried different approaches over the past 3-4 years, added and eliminated foods, supplements, hormones, etc., etc. It works like a charm for my husband, but for me … ?!? I know this is a vague explanation of what I’ve been doing and tried, but I don’t want to go into detail here, unless someone thinks they can really help. I have gotten out my Keto Reset Diet (again), AND signed up for this year’s challenge, helps, etc. So, I’m still trying and will never give up. I can’t give up. My health and well being are too important to me. Any ideas?

  21. I just did Keto for about 3 weeks (with a 3 day break for Christmas) after hearing about it from my mom, and was doing great, lost 10 lbs, was easy to go in and out of ketosis if I needed to, was following the diet pretty easily and making my macros, but I have subclinical hypothyroidism and after a while I started having severe drops in energy after so many days in ketosis. It happened after 6 days then I did a carb refeed and felt much better, then it happened again 5 days later, so I decided not to continue with Keto since I had stopped losing any weight for about a week and my thyroid was obviously not happy. That’s when I started researching diets for thyroid health and found MDA and decided to try primal instead, since it’s almost the same thing just less restrictive, and I can get the carbs my thyroid needs to function. Now after my weight loss had stalled for about a week (and I had actually gained back 3 lbs,) I’ve lost those 3 lbs again plus 1 more in only a few days on Primal. I think my thyroid had started downregulating my metabolism on Keto and releasing reverse T3 with so few carbs in my diet, I could pretty much feel the hormone being released – I was suddenly so so tired and could barely keep my eyes open. So I’m feeling much better now and hopefully I continue to lose weight! And I love being able to eat more fruit again! Thanks Mark!

  22. I wish these were true for me. I quit eating keto because I felt like I was starving. I lost a ton of weight and I started losing even more, which was too much. I’m training for a marathon and eating keto just wasn’t working for my muscles. I know it does for some people, but I’ve struggled. Sadly, keto is the best thing I’ve ever done for my depression, but my muscles don’t like it. I need to figure out how to get back to keto without losing any more weight!

    1. Hi, Natalie! What do you mean when you say it wasn’t working for your muscles? Were you feeling weak, or…?

      The weight loss isn’t from ketosis per se but from calorie restriction. I’m wondering if you are someone who experiences a lot of appetite suppression on keto, coupled with the marathon training, and were just really low on energy (calories) overall? If so, there might be a way for you to tweak your approach to keto so that you can still enjoy the benefits for the depression and maintain your training and body comp. Are you a member of our Facebook communities (Keto Reset and/or Primal Endurance)?

  23. I started keto the day after Thanksgiving 2018. I had no trouble adapting to the diet and lost 11 pounds the first month. I haven’t lost an ounce since then. I’ve tried everything–intermittent fasting (OMD), lowering fat and increasing protein, eating a few more calories, eating a few less calories. I tried “cheating” a few days by adding more carbs (I’ve religiously kept to 20g) then going back to strict keto. I don’t snack. I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. The only thing I haven’t tried is intense exercise, which I can’t do because of severe degenerative lumbar scoliosis and arthritis in my hips and knees. I really like this way of eating because I don’t have cravings. My husband is doing it, too, because he has type 2 diabetes and heart disease (I have neither), and I need to cook this way to support him. It’s very frustrating to read about people losing a lot of weight and here I’ve been stalled for almost three months. I’ve read everything I can find, and I just don’t know what to do anymore. I desperately need to get about 40 more pounds off to help with my back pain. The only positive thing I can say is that my weight has stabilized, and I haven’t gained anything back. I check my blood ketones weekly (at different times of the day), and I can’t get above 1.7, so I know I’m not efficiently burning my body fat, yet I continue to lower the amount of fat in my diet. Any help would be greatly appreciated.