Mark's Daily Apple https://www.marksdailyapple.com Thu, 06 May 2021 17:07:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 The Best Way to Hydrate, According to a Health Coach https://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-best-way-to-hydrate-according-to-a-health-coach/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-best-way-to-hydrate-according-to-a-health-coach/#comments Thu, 06 May 2021 17:07:02 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=118322 We’re all looking for the perfect formula, right? Just tell me how many grams of fat and carbs to eat. How many steps to take per day. And how many glasses of water I should be drinking within a 24-hour period. We love the precision of it all. The safety of micromanaging every detail of our life with the promise that if we can dial it in enough, we’ll enjoy perfect health for the rest of our days. But when you think about all the forcing, measuring, counting, and obsessive overplanning that goes into this kind of micromanagement, there’s actually nothing healthy about it. There’s nothing healthy about ignoring your body’s own cues in favor of what general nutrition — or random social media influencers say. Nutrition might be a science, but it’s also an art form. And learning to trust your body and what it’s trying to tell you trumps any water-to weight-ratio chart you’ll find online. But How Much Water Should You Drink? I’ve always followed Mark’s wisdom around water consumption. We both believe that the body has a well-regulated system for preventing dehydration and a built-in mechanism to let you know when we need more water. That internal mechanism is called your thirst. How much water you need is highly individual. Meaning, it depends on your unique circumstances, your activity level, and the climate you live in. Not only that, the advice to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day or half your bodyweight in ounces isn’t based on actual evidence. Those guidelines initially game from the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board recommendations back in 1945, stating that people should drink 2.5 liters of water per day. Unfortunately, people who read that statement neglected to read the following sentence that read, “Most of this quantity is contained in foods.” I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! Caffeinated Drinks Work Against You, Right? A review published in the American Journal of Physiology goes even further to debunk the 8 glasses or 2 liter of water per day recommendation. Researchers looked at studies that measured the food and fluid intake of 28,081 men and women in the United States and found that such large volumes of water weren’t necessary for good health. They also found that caffeinated drinks (and to a lesser extent, alcohol) added to hydration levels, specifically noting that nearly one-half (47%) of the total fluids ingested by participants were coffee, tea, soft drinks, and alcohol. So, as a health coach, I don’t push the hydration issue. Instead, I empower my clients to tune into something I think most of us don’t have a good … Continue reading "The Best Way to Hydrate, According to a Health Coach"

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We’re all looking for the perfect formula, right? Just tell me how many grams of fat and carbs to eat. How many steps to take per day. And how many glasses of water I should be drinking within a 24-hour period.

We love the precision of it all. The safety of micromanaging every detail of our life with the promise that if we can dial it in enough, we’ll enjoy perfect health for the rest of our days. But when you think about all the forcing, measuring, counting, and obsessive overplanning that goes into this kind of micromanagement, there’s actually nothing healthy about it.

There’s nothing healthy about ignoring your body’s own cues in favor of what general nutrition — or random social media influencers say. Nutrition might be a science, but it’s also an art form. And learning to trust your body and what it’s trying to tell you trumps any water-to weight-ratio chart you’ll find online.

But How Much Water Should You Drink?

I’ve always followed Mark’s wisdom around water consumption. We both believe that the body has a well-regulated system for preventing dehydration and a built-in mechanism to let you know when we need more water. That internal mechanism is called your thirst.1

How much water you need is highly individual. Meaning, it depends on your unique circumstances, your activity level, and the climate you live in. Not only that, the advice to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day or half your bodyweight in ounces isn’t based on actual evidence.

Those guidelines initially game from the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board recommendations back in 1945, stating that people should drink 2.5 liters of water per day.2 Unfortunately, people who read that statement neglected to read the following sentence that read, “Most of this quantity is contained in foods.”


I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start.

I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy.

It sounds easy, but it feels hard.

Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years.

Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support!


Caffeinated Drinks Work Against You, Right?

A review published in the American Journal of Physiology goes even further to debunk the 8 glasses or 2 liter of water per day recommendation. Researchers looked at studies that measured the food and fluid intake of 28,081 men and women in the United States and found that such large volumes of water weren’t necessary for good health.3

They also found that caffeinated drinks (and to a lesser extent, alcohol) added to hydration levels, specifically noting that nearly one-half (47%) of the total fluids ingested by participants were coffee, tea, soft drinks, and alcohol.

So, as a health coach, I don’t push the hydration issue. Instead, I empower my clients to tune into something I think most of us don’t have a good handle on. And that’s trusting your body.

What If You Drank When You Were Thirsty?

And while you’re at it, how about eating when you’re hungry, sleeping when you feel tired, and speaking up when you’ve got something to say? Wouldn’t that be miraculous? It would be so freaking liberating to stop forcing every single detail and instead, have a little faith that your body knows what it’s doing.

The trust your body message is something that gets lost in today’s world. In fact, we work extra hard to ignore those subtle and not-so-subtle signs. In fact, humans are the only species that exerts energy when they don’t need to.4

We deprive ourselves of sleep on purpose because there’s more work to crank out, or it’s too early to go to bed. We snub our hunger pangs because we tell ourselves we shouldn’t eat ‘til our fasting window opens if we want to lose weight.

We’ve become so used to ignoring and pushing through the discomfort that we’ve forgotten how to honor the miracle that is our body. I’m not saying you shouldn’t push yourself. But by training your brain to disregard the signs and symptoms, you’re doing yourself and your wellbeing a disservice.

Want to Know the Best Way to Hydrate?

From a health coaching perspective, the best way to hydrate is get tuned in to what your body is telling you. No one knows you better than you do. And when you get really dialed into your internal signals (instead of continuing the pattern of ignoring them), you don’t have to subject yourself to tracking your water intake — or monitoring your macros for that matter.

  1. Notice what thirst feels like. We’ve become so used to fighting hunger pains, pulling all-nighters, and completely disregarding our body’s signals, that being disconnected is kind of the new normal. But when your body is feeling something, anything, you should always take it as a sign. Pay attention to when your mouth gets dry, or you get a slight itch in the back of your throat. That’s your body telling you its thirsty.
  2. Respond to that feeling. Once you’ve learned how to notice what’s going on, the next step is to take action. Respect your body enough to give it what it’s asking for. Go get some water, drink a smoothie, have a cup of coffee. When you consciously respond to these signals, you begin to trust your body more. And vice versa.
  3. Hone your self-efficacy skills. In other words, if you believe you can do it, you’re more likely to actually do it. Even if you’re not naturally inclined to think this way, you can learn to have more self-efficacy by setting small goals for yourself (notice when you’re thirsty and go grab some water), being aware of your patterns (ignoring your body’s signals), and getting up to refill your water glass anyway.
  4. Stop worrying about what others are doing. A quick search for “how much water should I drink” brings up hundreds of thousands of results ranging in answers from two liters to fifteen and a half cups. Like I said before, no one knows your body better than you. So instead of stressing over what other people are doing (or saying), keep working steps one through three and tune into your own perfect formula.

Four Ways to Hydrate Better

Forget the 8×8 rule or recommendations to drink half your bodyweight in ounces. The best way to hydrate is to listen to your body. Use these steps to practice tuning into your body’s internal signals, and drink when you’re thirsty. You’ll stay hydrated without having to micromanage your water intake.

  1. Notice what thirst feels like
  2. Respond to that feeling
  3. Hone your self-efficacy skills
  4. Stop worrying about what others are doing

Now it’s your turn. How do you decide how much water to drink?

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A Fresh Look at High-Protein https://www.marksdailyapple.com/a-fresh-look-at-high-protein/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/a-fresh-look-at-high-protein/#comments Wed, 05 May 2021 15:33:37 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=118226 Ten years ago, I ate a high protein diet. I regularly ate and recommended a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. That meant I was putting down 160, 170 grams of protein a day myself. Later, I moderated my protein intake and focused more on my fat intake, thinking that I'd be better off in the long term eating less protein and using my muscle mass, physical and mental performance, and overall vitality as a "signal" for when protein was too low. Researchers were looking at high protein intakes, noticing they could raise IGF-1 and trigger mTOR, which in some animal models have been linked to cancer and reduced longevity, and positing that lower protein intakes were healthier. I was never "low-protein," but I certainly ate less than before. I will say that throughout all this time a major determinant of my protein intake was my instinctual hunger for it. When I ate a lot of protein, I did so because I desired it on a base, Primal level. When I ate less, I did so partly because of the research but also because I wasn't as hungry for it (and my performance never indicated I was lacking). But in recent years, I've been eating more protein again. In fact, I eat by most accounts a high-protein diet. Why? What changed? I took a fresh look at the research. I'm always researching. That's the nature of my work here, and it never stops. As I read more into the protein/IGF-1/longevity connection, I became skeptical of the idea that protein is harmful because it "spikes IGF-1." It turns out that elevating IGF-1 isn't necessarily a bad thing; resistance training spikes IGF-1, and the beneficial effects of resistance training are largely dependent on the IGF-1 increase. It turns out that the majority of human research into IGF-1 and longevity shows either a positive relationship (higher IGF-1, longer lifespan) or a neutral one. Really low levels of IFG-1 are bad for longevity, while really high levels are linked to cancer—and even those relationships aren't totally clear. If protein was spiking IGF-1, that might actually be a good thing. After all, the more protein an older person eats, the longer they live and the healthier they live. The more I looked, the more the evidence for limiting protein seemed to fall apart. The more I realized it consisted almost entirely of myths and misconceptions. I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! Common Myths about High Protein Diets What are the most common myths and misconceptions about high protein diets? High protein damages your kidneys I'd already covered the myth that protein is … Continue reading "A Fresh Look at High-Protein"

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Young People Having Fun At Barbecue Party.Ten years ago, I ate a high protein diet. I regularly ate and recommended a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. That meant I was putting down 160, 170 grams of protein a day myself.

Later, I moderated my protein intake and focused more on my fat intake, thinking that I’d be better off in the long term eating less protein and using my muscle mass, physical and mental performance, and overall vitality as a “signal” for when protein was too low. Researchers were looking at high protein intakes, noticing they could raise IGF-1 and trigger mTOR, which in some animal models have been linked to cancer and reduced longevity, and positing that lower protein intakes were healthier. I was never “low-protein,” but I certainly ate less than before. I will say that throughout all this time a major determinant of my protein intake was my instinctual hunger for it. When I ate a lot of protein, I did so because I desired it on a base, Primal level. When I ate less, I did so partly because of the research but also because I wasn’t as hungry for it (and my performance never indicated I was lacking).

But in recent years, I’ve been eating more protein again. In fact, I eat by most accounts a high-protein diet. Why? What changed?

I took a fresh look at the research.

I’m always researching. That’s the nature of my work here, and it never stops. As I read more into the protein/IGF-1/longevity connection, I became skeptical of the idea that protein is harmful because it “spikes IGF-1.” It turns out that elevating IGF-1 isn’t necessarily a bad thing; resistance training spikes IGF-1, and the beneficial effects of resistance training are largely dependent on the IGF-1 increase. It turns out that the majority of human research into IGF-1 and longevity shows either a positive relationship (higher IGF-1, longer lifespan) or a neutral one.5 Really low levels of IFG-1 are bad for longevity, while really high levels are linked to cancer—and even those relationships aren’t totally clear. If protein was spiking IGF-1, that might actually be a good thing. After all, the more protein an older person eats, the longer they live and the healthier they live.

The more I looked, the more the evidence for limiting protein seemed to fall apart. The more I realized it consisted almost entirely of myths and misconceptions.


I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start.

I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy.

It sounds easy, but it feels hard.

Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years.

Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support!


Common Myths about High Protein Diets

What are the most common myths and misconceptions about high protein diets?

High protein damages your kidneys

I’d already covered the myth that protein is bad for your kidneys. It’s not, it’s actually good for them, and it protects against many of the maladies that do increase your risk of incurring kidney disease. While an unhealthy kidney may have to limit protein, a healthy kidney will not.

High protein creates toxic gut metabolites

Another popular trope was that protein fermentation in the gut creates toxic “fecal water” that has carcinogenic effects. Eating more protein than you could digest was supposed to trigger protein fermentation, which would lead to toxic fecal water and colon cancer. Also false: studies show that while high protein diets can increase protein fermentation, they do not increase fecal water carcinogenicity and may actually decrease cytotoxicity.6

High protein destroys your bones

Another myth is that protein “leaches” calcium from your bones and causes osteoporosis. The opposite is actually true. Human research consistently finds that higher protein intakes protect against osteoporosis, improve healing after bone injuries, and help prevent falls and fractures in older adults.7


Turn up your grilling game with Primal Kitchen® Buffalo Sauce, Hawaiian BBQ Sauce, Steak Sauce, No Soy Teriyaki and more! 


High protein converts to sugar

Several years back, you could hear people say that eating extra protein is “just like eating chocolate cake.” They were wrong.  Gluconeogenesis—the creation of glucose from protein—is demand driven, not substrate driven. Your body will only convert protein into glucose when it needs the glucose. It will not turn protein into glucose just because it’s laying around and available. One study even found that eating 160 grams of protein in a single meal had no effect on blood glucose levels.8 If anything, high protein diets will improve blood glucose control.9

So if high protein diets don’t decrease longevity (and maybe even increase it), don’t damage healthy kidneys, don’t give you colon cancer, and don’t worsen blood glucose levels, is there even a good argument against them?

The thing about the arguments against high-protein diets is that they were always theoretical. The supposed consequences of eating more protein were off in the distance, yet to be realized, but “they just had to be true.” You could never pin them down. They were based on some plausible mechanisms whose plausibility crumbled as time wore on. They never materialized.

Nor did the supposed benefits of low-protein diets ever appear. On the contrary, low protein diets have been shown to have unabashedly negative effects. Low-protein diets:

  • Slow the metabolism, increase insulin resistance, and cause body fat gain.10
  • Impair the immune system and make infections more severe.11
  • Reduce muscle function, cellular mass (yes, the actual mass of the cell itself), and immune response in elderly women.12
  • Impair nitrogen balance in athletes.13
  • Increase the risk of osteoporosis.14
  • Increase the risk of sarcopenia (muscle wasting).15

Those are proven effects. Those are realized consequences.

The Benefits of High-Protein Diets

Meanwhile, pretty much all the research we have on high-protein intakes finds or suggests benefits.

Less hunger

Of all the macronutrients, protein increases satiation the most.16 This means a low-carb diet replete in protein can help control your appetite naturally—without you even trying. You just aren’t as hungry, and that makes it much easier to control calorie intake.

Lean mass retention during dieting

Weight loss from dieting is often non-specific. People lose muscle as often as they lose body fat. But with extra protein in the diet, you’re more likely to lose body fat and retain muscle mass during weight loss. In women, for example, a low-calorie, high-protein diet was better than a conventional high-carb, low-fat diet at promoting lean mass retention, even in the absence of exercise.17

Better cognitive aging

In older adults, high protein intake in excess of calories was the only macronutrient that was not associated with dementia. Those who ate excess amounts of fat and carbohydrate were at greater risk of dementia, while those who ate “excess” protein were not.18

Good safety profile

We know that athletes eating up to 3.3 grams of protein per kg of bodyweight each day for over a year have no negative effects and only positive ones.19 Lean mass increased, fat mass decreased. Kidney and liver function were fine. Blood lipids were good. Now, you could say that “a year of high protein dieting isn’t enough to show all the negative effects,” but you’d be pontificating about the future again. About unrealized potentialities. “Just you wait!”

There are caveats, of course.

High protein should always be paired with physical activity. Throughout human history, you couldn’t get protein without working for it. Meat and physical exertion have always been linked. You expend energy, engage your muscle fibers, obtain meat, eat the meat, activate muscle protein synthesis. It’s the same cycle. Only today, you can divest from that relationship. You can step out of the cycle. You can have a delivery guy drop off a crate of frozen steaks. You can stumble into the kitchen and whisk 40 grams of whey isolate into your water. It takes no physical effort, and that’s going to have ramifications.

One potential ramification of inadequate strength training is the buildup of ammonia, a toxic metabolite of protein digestion that we normally clear by converting to urea and expelling through the urine. If we “overload” the system, the ammonia may linger and cause health issues like brain fog. Resistance training has been shown to reduce serum ammonia in rats. They tied weights to their tails and had them climb ladders—the rat equivalent of lifting weights—and found that it reduced serum ammonia.20 If this holds true in people, then resistance training increases your protein “ceiling” by improving ammonia clearance and urea metabolism.

So make sure you’re lifting heavy things and moving around frequently—these activities increase your “protein ceiling.”

Another factor that increases your protein ceiling is dieting. The more calories you cut, the more likely your body is to start catabolizing muscle tissue. Eating a high-protein diet can mitigate this effect and stave off muscle loss.

And then there’s bed rest and injuries: both increase the amount of protein you should be eating. If you’re on bed rest or recovering from an injury or illness and can’t exactly make it to the gym, you should still eat extra protein to stave off lean mass attrition and improve healing. The binding principle is “protein ceiling.” Anything you can do to increase that protein ceiling and increase your “need” for protein, whether it’s physical activity or calorie restriction or injuries that require more healing, will make higher protein intakes safer and more effective.

Provided you get adequate physical activity, eat a nutrient-dense diet, and have good kidney health, there’s no reason not to try eating more protein if it appeals to you. The results may pleasantly surprise you—especially if you’re trying to lose weight and retain (or gain) lean mass.

What’s your protein intake like these days? How much protein do you eat?

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Ways to Get Your Electrolytes (That Aren’t Sports Drinks) https://www.marksdailyapple.com/ways-to-get-your-electrolytes-that-arent-sports-drinks/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/ways-to-get-your-electrolytes-that-arent-sports-drinks/#comments Tue, 04 May 2021 18:15:47 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=118193 When we talk about “getting enough electrolytes,” we usually mean the big three: sodium, potassium, and magnesium. There are many others, including calcium, chloride, and bicarbonate, but the big three are the ones targeted by supplement and sports nutrition companies. In part, that’s because sodium especially, but also potassium and magnesium, are lost through sweat. Athletes need to replenish these electrolytes during and after hard workouts or endurance outings in order to maintain optimal hydration and performance. Sodium and potassium work together to manage fluid balance throughout the body and facilitate muscle contractions and nerve firing. Magnesium is critical for cellular energy production and the transport of sodium and potassium across cell membranes. I’m not going to go into a lot of detail about the other functions of electrolytes in the body since Mark recently covered the topic in his Electrolytes 101 post. Suffice it to say that if you don’t maintain the proper levels of electrolytes, you’re in a world of hurt. Should I Be Taking Electrolyte Supplements? Not everyone needs to supplement with electrolytes, but everyone needs to get the right amount. Your kidneys do a good job keeping electrolytes in balance by retaining or excreting specific electrolytes as needed. However, the kidneys can only do their job if you provide enough electrolytes to begin with, and there’s the rub. Even Primal folks who consume abundant produce and animal products may struggle to get enough electrolytes from their food due to mineral-depleted soil. Paleo godfather Loren Cordain speculates that potassium intake in particular lags behind our biological needs. Furthermore, if you’ve jumped on the ketogenic train, you need more electrolytes than the average person. When you drop your carb intake, insulin secretion decreases accordingly. This triggers ketone production as well as a rapid flush of electrolytes. Failure to replenish lost electrolytes, particularly sodium, is probably the number one culprit behind the dreaded keto flu. Sports drinks are not the best way to up your electrolyte intake, though. Most of them are designed to provide energy (read: sugar) and hydration first and foremost. They probably won’t offer the amount of electrolytes you want, plus they usually contain other undesirable ingredients you don't need. Luckily, it’s easy to up your electrolyte intake with better, more Primal-friendly sources. I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start. I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy. It sounds easy, but it feels hard. Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years. Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support! How Much Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium Do You Need? Sodium: The current recommended daily intake for adults is 1,500 mg per day, but that’s probably not enough for most people. The sweet spot seems to be between 4 and 6 grams per day for adults who do not have salt-sensitive hypertension or kidney disease. Potassium: … Continue reading "Ways to Get Your Electrolytes (That Aren’t Sports Drinks)"

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sportswoman drinking water in front of concrete wallWhen we talk about “getting enough electrolytes,” we usually mean the big three: sodium, potassium, and magnesium. There are many others, including calcium, chloride, and bicarbonate, but the big three are the ones targeted by supplement and sports nutrition companies.

In part, that’s because sodium especially, but also potassium and magnesium, are lost through sweat. Athletes need to replenish these electrolytes during and after hard workouts or endurance outings in order to maintain optimal hydration and performance. Sodium and potassium work together to manage fluid balance throughout the body and facilitate muscle contractions and nerve firing. Magnesium is critical for cellular energy production and the transport of sodium and potassium across cell membranes.

I’m not going to go into a lot of detail about the other functions of electrolytes in the body since Mark recently covered the topic in his Electrolytes 101 post. Suffice it to say that if you don’t maintain the proper levels of electrolytes, you’re in a world of hurt.

Should I Be Taking Electrolyte Supplements?

Not everyone needs to supplement with electrolytes, but everyone needs to get the right amount. Your kidneys do a good job keeping electrolytes in balance by retaining or excreting specific electrolytes as needed. However, the kidneys can only do their job if you provide enough electrolytes to begin with, and there’s the rub. Even Primal folks who consume abundant produce and animal products may struggle to get enough electrolytes from their food due to mineral-depleted soil. Paleo godfather Loren Cordain speculates that potassium intake in particular lags behind our biological needs.21

Furthermore, if you’ve jumped on the ketogenic train, you need more electrolytes than the average person. When you drop your carb intake, insulin secretion decreases accordingly. This triggers ketone production as well as a rapid flush of electrolytes. Failure to replenish lost electrolytes, particularly sodium, is probably the number one culprit behind the dreaded keto flu.

Sports drinks are not the best way to up your electrolyte intake, though. Most of them are designed to provide energy (read: sugar) and hydration first and foremost. They probably won’t offer the amount of electrolytes you want, plus they usually contain other undesirable ingredients you don’t need. Luckily, it’s easy to up your electrolyte intake with better, more Primal-friendly sources.


I know meditation is good for me, but I don’t know how to start.

I’ve tried to meditate before, but my mind is too busy.

It sounds easy, but it feels hard.

Not sure what the hype is all about? Find out why millions of people have been meditating for thousands of years.

Meditate with us for 21 days, complete with video meditations, a tracker, and community support!


How Much Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium Do You Need?

Sodium: The current recommended daily intake for adults is 1,500 mg per day, but that’s probably not enough for most people. The sweet spot seems to be between 4 and 6 grams per day for adults who do not have salt-sensitive hypertension or kidney disease.

Potassium:22 The FDA’s recommended daily intake (RDI) is 4,700 mg per day.

Magnesium:23 For adult females, 310 mg per day up to age 30, 320 mg per day thereafter. For adult males, 400 mg per day up to age 30, 420 mg per day after that.

Keto Dieters’ Electrolyte Requirements

Keto dieters should aim for:

  • 3 to 5 grams (3,000 to 5,000 mg) of sodium
  • 1 to 3.5 grams (1,000 to 3,500 mg) of potassium
  • 300 to 500 mg of magnesium

These are in addition to what you get from food. If you are already getting at least the RDI of potassium from your diet, you might choose not to add more. However, as I said, it’s unlikely that you consistently get enough.

How to Get Electrolytes without Sports Drinks

Start with Food

Getting electrolytes from your diet is preferable to supplementing. Start by estimating your typical daily electrolyte intake, ideally by tracking your food for a few days using an app. I prefer Cronometer, but any app that provides detailed nutritional information will do. Don’t forget to track beverages, too.

If you find that you’re not hitting your targets, try adding more electrolyte-rich foods first, then supplement as needed.

How to Get Sodium in Your Diet

(Note: All the nutrition information below comes from Cronometer.)

Bacon and other cured meats, canned fish, or salted nuts can contribute up to a few hundred mg of sodium per serving. Smaller amounts naturally occur in some produce like beets and carrots, and in seaweed and fresh seafood. Dairy products also contain sodium, and even your drinking water contributes a little.

By and large, though, most of the sodium you consume in a day comes from the salt you add to your food. Different types of salt contain different amounts of sodium. A teaspoon of sea salt has about 2,100 to 2,300 mg of sodium, whereas a teaspoon of kosher salt only has between 1,100 and 1,900 mg.

Primal eaters should feel free to salt their food liberally. Your food will taste better if you do! Also, adding a generous pinch of salt to your drinking water enhances the body’s ability to absorb the water so you stay hydrated. (Add a squeeze of lemon to mask the taste.)

Foods Rich in Potassium

Primal eaters usually don’t include many of the highest-potassium foods in their diets: legumes, dried fruits, bananas. No worries! A medium-sized banana contains 422 grams in a medium-sized fruit. There are plenty of Primal-friendly options that beat it. Here’s just a sampling:

  • Avocado (1 whole, 136 g): 690 mg
  • Clams, cooked (10 small, 100 g): 628 mg
  • Butternut squash (1 cup cubed, 205 g): 582 mg
  • Spinach, raw (3 cups, 90 g): 502 mg
  • Beets, cooked (1 cup diced, 157 g): 479 mg

These don’t beat bananas, but they still get honorable mentions:

  • Coconut water (8 ounces, 240 ml): 410 mg
  • Ground beef, 85% lean, raw (4 ounces, 113 g): 333 mg
  • Sockeye salmon, raw (3 ounces, 85 g): 306 mg
  • Canned anchovies (Wild Planet brand, one can, 85 g): 235 mg
  • Broccoli, raw (1 cup chopped, 91 g): 288 mg

Potatoes are still controversial in the ancestral health space, but they contain more potassium than any of the foods listed above. A medium-sized baked potato (131 g) clocks in at 512 mg of potassium. Eating the skin nets you an additional 400 mg! If you don’t want to eat white potatoes, and you’re not aiming for very low carb intake, a medium-sized sweet potato (150 g) delivers 713 mg of potassium.

As you can see, though, it takes quite a lot to hit the RDI of 4,700 mg per day, even if you eat plenty of these relatively high-potassium foods.

Best Foods for Magnesium

With both magnesium and potassium, you’ll get some from most Primal foods. Some of the higher-magnesium foods are:

  • Almonds, dry roasted (¼ cup, 35 g): 96 mg
  • Spinach, raw (3 cups, 90 g): 71 mg
  • Pumpkin seeds, roasted (¼ cup, 16 g): 42 mg
  • Chia seeds (1 Tbsp, 10g): 39 mg
  • Avocado (1 whole, 136 g): 39 mg
  • Sockeye salmon, raw (3 ounces, 85 g): 23 mg

Remember, you don’t need nearly as much magnesium as you do potassium or sodium.

Supplement Electrolytes as Needed

You can purchase magnesium and potassium as individual supplements. Check your daily multivitamin/multimineral formula, too, to see how much you’re getting there.

The easiest way to add sodium is from good ol’ salt. Losalt is a lower-sodium salt that contains 1800 mg of potassium and 688 mg of sodium per teaspoon.

You can also buy electrolyte powders that you add to water. Read the labels to see how much sodium, potassium, and magnesium you are getting with each product and to make sure they don’t have added sugar. Some products don’t contain all three electrolytes, which might be desirable or not depending on what you need. Others contain all three but in paltry amounts. My personal favorite is LMNT, which contains good amounts of the big three in the correct proportions.

What about Baking Soda?

Some evidence suggests that baking soda is anti-inflammatory and can buffer acidosis, which is why it’s becoming increasingly popular among athletes and folks with autoimmune issues. It also seems to boost ketone production.24

The chemical formula for baking is sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). One-quarter teaspoon contains 315 mg of sodium, plus bicarbonate, another electrolyte. The downside to using baking soda as a supplement is that it can cause significant GI distress if you overdo it. Start small!

A Note on Safe Supplementing

It’s almost impossible to overdo electrolyte intake when you’re talking about the minerals that naturally occur in real food. However, supplementing is a different story. With any electrolyte, you can run into problems by taking too much. That’s why I suggest tracking your food intake first—so you know how much more of each you actually need.

In particular, excessive potassium can lead to heart arrhythmias. When taken correctly, potassium supplements are generally considered to be safe for adults whose kidneys are healthy. As always, ask your doctor if you’re not sure if they’re right for you.

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Gluten-free, Paleo, and Primal Cinco de Mayo Recipes https://www.marksdailyapple.com/gluten-free-paleo-and-primal-cinco-de-mayo-recipes/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/gluten-free-paleo-and-primal-cinco-de-mayo-recipes/#comments Sat, 01 May 2021 17:46:01 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=118202 A lot of people use Cinco de Mayo as an excuse to hit up their favorite taco shop and kick back with a margarita, completely unaware of the historical significance. Did you know that May 5th marks the anniversary of the day that Mexico drove out French military in 1862? Now you know why you're clinking your salt-rimmed glasses and piling on the guacamole. While there's nothing wrong with a meal of Mexican food, it might be tough to stick with your eating style if you're picking up takeout. Here are 6 Mexican-inspired recipes that you can whip up on May 5th, whether you're following a gluten-free, paleo, or Primal lifestyle. Shrimp and Cauliflower Rice Bowls Recipe An artfully arranged rice bowl is a hearty meal that’s packed with a variety of colors, flavors, textures, and even temperatures. The thing is, the good stuff usually sits on top of a packed bed of rice, which could push your carbs over the edge if you’re trying to keep them low. Riced cauliflower is an easy substitute that creates just as satisfying a bowl as the real thing. While it looks like a lot of effort, this shrimp and cauli-rice bowl recipe comes together in just a few minutes. Get the recipe here. Keto Burrito Recipe Everyone loves a good burrito. They’re hearty, filling, and you can stuff them with whatever you’re in the mood to eat. Wrap them up, and they make a convenient and flavorful meal on the go. Can you have burritos when you’re keto, though? When you’re keeping your carbs low, good burritos can seem out of reach. Traditional flour tortillas send your carb counts through the roof, and inflammatory grains drain you of all of your energy. Other store-bought tortilla options are either just as carby, they have questionable ingredients, or they simply just don’t hold up. We found a way. This keto burrito recipe has all of the flavor you’re looking for, without the carb-loaded carrying case. Instead, we use a thin, crepe-like egg pancake that compliments any burrito ingredient combination you can dream up. Get the recipe here.    Egg Tacos with Avocado and Lime Recipe These aren’t fried eggs, nor are they scrambled. The eggs in these tacos are just slightly set, with a warm, runny yolk that is barely scrambled into the whites. Slide one of these gently cooked eggs into a warm tortilla, top with cool avocado and lime and slices of jalapeno and you’ve got the perfect breakfast taco. Although these egg tacos are delicious for dinner, too. Get the recipe here.  Sheet Pan Steak Fajitas Recipe The whole point of sheet pan meals is to make life easier by delivering a flavorful, balanced meal to your table with very little cooking and cleanup involved. These sheet pan steak fajitas deliver on all counts. Strips of steak, bell pepper and onions served with avocado and salsa is a delicious mix of protein, colorful vegetables and healthy fat. Everything cooks together at … Continue reading "Gluten-free, Paleo, and Primal Cinco de Mayo Recipes"

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shrimp cauliflower rice bowlsA lot of people use Cinco de Mayo as an excuse to hit up their favorite taco shop and kick back with a margarita, completely unaware of the historical significance. Did you know that May 5th marks the anniversary of the day that Mexico drove out French military in 1862? Now you know why you’re clinking your salt-rimmed glasses and piling on the guacamole.

While there’s nothing wrong with a meal of Mexican food, it might be tough to stick with your eating style if you’re picking up takeout. Here are 6 Mexican-inspired recipes that you can whip up on May 5th, whether you’re following a gluten-free, paleo, or Primal lifestyle.

Shrimp and Cauliflower Rice Bowls Recipe

shrimp cauliflower rice bowls

An artfully arranged rice bowl is a hearty meal that’s packed with a variety of colors, flavors, textures, and even temperatures. The thing is, the good stuff usually sits on top of a packed bed of rice, which could push your carbs over the edge if you’re trying to keep them low. Riced cauliflower is an easy substitute that creates just as satisfying a bowl as the real thing. While it looks like a lot of effort, this shrimp and cauli-rice bowl recipe comes together in just a few minutes.

Get the recipe here.

Keto Burrito Recipe

keto burrito recipe

Everyone loves a good burrito. They’re hearty, filling, and you can stuff them with whatever you’re in the mood to eat. Wrap them up, and they make a convenient and flavorful meal on the go. Can you have burritos when you’re keto, though?

When you’re keeping your carbs low, good burritos can seem out of reach. Traditional flour tortillas send your carb counts through the roof, and inflammatory grains drain you of all of your energy. Other store-bought tortilla options are either just as carby, they have questionable ingredients, or they simply just don’t hold up.

We found a way. This keto burrito recipe has all of the flavor you’re looking for, without the carb-loaded carrying case. Instead, we use a thin, crepe-like egg pancake that compliments any burrito ingredient combination you can dream up.

Get the recipe here. 

 

Egg Tacos with Avocado and Lime Recipe

These aren’t fried eggs, nor are they scrambled. The eggs in these tacos are just slightly set, with a warm, runny yolk that is barely scrambled into the whites. Slide one of these gently cooked eggs into a warm tortilla, top with cool avocado and lime and slices of jalapeno and you’ve got the perfect breakfast taco. Although these egg tacos are delicious for dinner, too.

Get the recipe here. 

Sheet Pan Steak Fajitas Recipe

The whole point of sheet pan meals is to make life easier by delivering a flavorful, balanced meal to your table with very little cooking and cleanup involved. These sheet pan steak fajitas deliver on all counts. Strips of steak, bell pepper and onions served with avocado and salsa is a delicious mix of protein, colorful vegetables and healthy fat. Everything cooks together at the same time. After dinner, a cutting board, one bowl and two sheet pans are the only cleanup you’ll be stuck with.

Get the recipe here. 

Taco Salad in an Edible Bowl Recipe

Taco salad made from seared steak, avocado, tomato, shredded lettuce, and creamy chipotle dressing is delicious without any embellishment. But if you happen to have cheddar cheese in the refrigerator and a few extra minutes to grate it and bake it, then why not make an edible cheddar bowl?

Get the recipe here. 

Layered Taco Casserole Recipe

This layered taco casserole is comfort food without a helping of regret. There are still layers of everything that make taco casserole great: tortillas, seasoned ground meat, chile peppers, cheese, and a mile-high topping of shredded lettuce, fresh tomatoes, avocado and green onions. But the tortillas are Primal- and Paleo-approved, the ground meat is grass-fed, and the cheese is high-quality aged Cheddar.

Get the recipe here. 

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 128 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/new-and-noteworthy-what-i-read-this-week-128/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/new-and-noteworthy-what-i-read-this-week-128/#comments Fri, 30 Apr 2021 16:52:48 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=118181 Research of the Week
In women, taking vitamins, probiotics, vitamin D, and omega-3s seems to reduce the risk of COVID infections.

Women who use combined oral contraceptives tend to have higher levels of oxidative stress and CRP.

What were the genetics of early Bronze Age Greeks?

Human laughter may have evolved from apes panting during play.

Livestock have always enriched grasslands.

A recent review of the evidence finds that the introduction of ivermectin reduces COVID morbidity.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts
Episode 487: Brad Kearns: Host Elle Russ chats with our other host Brad Kearns about the new book he and I wrote together, Two Meals a Day.

Episode 488: Luke Tyburski: Host Brad Kearns chats with Luke Tyburski, former pro soccer player turned extreme endurance athlete turned mental health coach.

Health Coach Radio: Erin and Laura chat with Mario Tomic about his journey to success.
Media, Schmedia
Dumped DDT off the coast of Los Angeles.
Interesting Blog Posts
Let's not.

Both Korean college students and Tsimane foragers have similar resting metabolic rates, high starch diets, and high-saturated fat body fat.
Social Notes
Young Scorsese had talent.

To squat is to be human.
Everything Else
Good luck with that.

Don't mess around with concussions.
Things I’m Up to and Interested In
I'm all for this if it works: Robot weeder that uses lasers to kill weeds.

This is mastery (and a great story): How Andre Agassi learned to read Boris Becker's serves.

Sometimes I see the appeal: Italian man living alone on an island off Sardinia is leaving after 32 years.

Is it time?: To end outdoor mask mandates.

Interesting article: Is drinking actually healthy?
Question I'm Asking
Would you live alone on an island?
Recipe Corner

Just an absolute classic: bacon and spinach.
Guacamole-stuffed BLT bites.

Time Capsule
One year ago (Apr 24 – Apr 30)

All About NAC: Side Effects, Supplements, Dosages — All about the important supplement.
Why Do I Feel Tired All the Time? — Well, why?

Comment of the Week
"Mark,
Your timing is impeccable. This week the performance period (week 14) of training for IRON MAN CDA began. Saturday ended with me in the back of an ambulance after a long bike/run day. I passed out, hit my head on the flagstones and was out cold for several minutes. Several tests indicate I have a low blood pressure condition following strenuous endurance activity. I had my pity party and I am now looking for my next adventure. I have several IM’s and I love Triathlon with a passion.ng outward brain expansion in the absence of constraining chewing muscles bound to the sagittal crests) … made us who we are today."

-Sorry to hear, Lima Whiskey. All the best.

The post New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 128 appeared first on Mark's Daily Apple.

]]>
Research of the Week

In women, taking vitamins, probiotics, vitamin D, and omega-3s seems to reduce the risk of COVID infections.

Women who use combined oral contraceptives tend to have higher levels of oxidative stress and CRP.

What were the genetics of early Bronze Age Greeks?

Human laughter may have evolved from apes panting during play.

Livestock have always enriched grasslands.

A recent review of the evidence finds that the introduction of ivermectin reduces COVID morbidity.

New Primal Blueprint Podcasts

Episode 487: Brad Kearns: Host Elle Russ chats with our other host Brad Kearns about the new book he and I wrote together, Two Meals a Day.

Episode 488: Luke Tyburski: Host Brad Kearns chats with Luke Tyburski, former pro soccer player turned extreme endurance athlete turned mental health coach.

Health Coach Radio: Erin and Laura chat with Mario Tomic about his journey to success.

Media, Schmedia

Dumped DDT off the coast of Los Angeles.

Interesting Blog Posts

Let’s not.

Both Korean college students and Tsimane foragers have similar resting metabolic rates, high starch diets, and high-saturated fat body fat.

Social Notes

Young Scorsese had talent.

To squat is to be human.

Everything Else

Good luck with that.

Don’t mess around with concussions.

Things I’m Up to and Interested In

I’m all for this if it works: Robot weeder that uses lasers to kill weeds.

This is mastery (and a great story): How Andre Agassi learned to read Boris Becker’s serves.

Sometimes I see the appeal: Italian man living alone on an island off Sardinia is leaving after 32 years.

Is it time?: To end outdoor mask mandates.

Interesting article: Is drinking actually healthy?

Question I’m Asking

Would you live alone on an island?

Recipe Corner

Time Capsule

One year ago (Apr 24 – Apr 30)

Comment of the Week

“Mark,
Your timing is impeccable. This week the performance period (week 14) of training for IRON MAN CDA began. Saturday ended with me in the back of an ambulance after a long bike/run day. I passed out, hit my head on the flagstones and was out cold for several minutes. Several tests indicate I have a low blood pressure condition following strenuous endurance activity. I had my pity party and I am now looking for my next adventure. I have several IM’s and I love Triathlon with a passion.ng outward brain expansion in the absence of constraining chewing muscles bound to the sagittal crests) … made us who we are today.”

-Sorry to hear, Lima Whiskey. All the best.

The post New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 128 appeared first on Mark's Daily Apple.

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7 Strategies for Making Change Less Stressful https://www.marksdailyapple.com/7-strategies-for-making-change-less-stressful/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/7-strategies-for-making-change-less-stressful/#comments Thu, 29 Apr 2021 18:01:56 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=117983 Whenever I meet with a new client, I can feel their apprehension about making any lifestyle changes within the first few minutes – especially once we start talking about food . It’s the worry about never being able to have their favorite foods again. The fear of not being able to stick with it. The judgement from friends and family, who, in their opinion, are going to alienate them from social functions, happy hours, and dinner parties (you know, once those are in full swing again). The emotions and ‘what ifs’ that come up for some people can seriously derail them from a life they love and completely deserve. Just the idea of change becomes such a roadblock that they’d rather stay stuck in their current patterns than take steps toward something different. Sound familiar? If so, stick around because I’m going to unpack why change is so stressful and tangible steps you can take to make it easier. Why Is Change So Hard? Your brain likes to keep you safe — that’s one of its very important jobs. It loves keeping you safely tucked inside your comfort zone where everything is nice and predictable. Why? Because when you experience change, your brain interprets it as a threat, so any action you attempt to take that’s outside your comfort zone will be sabotaged because of your basic human needs for survival and certainty. Unfortunately, resisting change, even something that’s good for your health and wellbeing, is in your nature. Psychologist and creator of the Transtheoretical Model of Change (or TTM), James Prochaska says we resist change, not because of the change itself, but our perception of change. It’s that deep down threat to our safety and security.   Is It a Setback or Progress? Altering your behaviours takes time and often involves backtracking, which may feel like a setback, but it’s not. You’re still moving forward. That’s because change isn’t a one-time event. It’s actually a series of non-linear events that happen over time, meaning you go back and forth between the stages, working through them until the change becomes fully established and there’s limited chance of you going back to your old ways. Check out the Transtheoretical Model Stages of Change to see what I mean: In the Pre-Contemplation Stage... You want to make a change, but you have no conscious intention of doing it. While this may make you feel like you’re not onboard, it’s a good sign. And it’s the first step in the process. In the Contemplation Stage.... You begin to have an internal debate about making a change and might have more insight on why it’s important to you. In the Preparation Stage... You’re weighing the consequences of your change and may take a small step toward it. If you want to change your diet, you might join the Keto Reset group on Facebook or research paleo recipes online. In the Action Stage... This is where you go from planning to doing. You’re engaging in online … Continue reading "7 Strategies for Making Change Less Stressful"

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Female nutritionist giving consultation to patient. Making diet plan.Whenever I meet with a new client, I can feel their apprehension about making any lifestyle changes within the first few minutes – especially once we start talking about food .

It’s the worry about never being able to have their favorite foods again. The fear of not being able to stick with it. The judgement from friends and family, who, in their opinion, are going to alienate them from social functions, happy hours, and dinner parties (you know, once those are in full swing again).

The emotions and ‘what ifs’ that come up for some people can seriously derail them from a life they love and completely deserve. Just the idea of change becomes such a roadblock that they’d rather stay stuck in their current patterns than take steps toward something different.

Sound familiar? If so, stick around because I’m going to unpack why change is so stressful and tangible steps you can take to make it easier.

Why Is Change So Hard?

Your brain likes to keep you safe — that’s one of its very important jobs. It loves keeping you safely tucked inside your comfort zone where everything is nice and predictable. Why? Because when you experience change, your brain interprets it as a threat, so any action you attempt to take that’s outside your comfort zone will be sabotaged because of your basic human needs for survival and certainty.

Unfortunately, resisting change, even something that’s good for your health and wellbeing, is in your nature.

Psychologist and creator of the Transtheoretical Model of Change (or TTM), James Prochaska says we resist change, not because of the change itself, but our perception of change. It’s that deep down threat to our safety and security.


 


Is It a Setback or Progress?

Altering your behaviours takes time and often involves backtracking, which may feel like a setback, but it’s not. You’re still moving forward. That’s because change isn’t a one-time event. It’s actually a series of non-linear events that happen over time, meaning you go back and forth between the stages, working through them until the change becomes fully established and there’s limited chance of you going back to your old ways.

Check out the Transtheoretical Model Stages of Change to see what I mean:

  • In the Pre-Contemplation Stage… You want to make a change, but you have no conscious intention of doing it. While this may make you feel like you’re not onboard, it’s a good sign. And it’s the first step in the process.
  • In the Contemplation Stage…. You begin to have an internal debate about making a change and might have more insight on why it’s important to you.
  • In the Preparation Stage… You’re weighing the consequences of your change and may take a small step toward it. If you want to change your diet, you might join the Keto Reset group on Facebook or research paleo recipes online.
  • In the Action Stage… This is where you go from planning to doing. You’re engaging in online groups and cooking up a few of the paleo recipes that sound interesting to you.
  • In the Maintenance Stage… In this stage, you’ve secured new habits, making your old habits feel less intense or frequent.

On top of that, research shows that you’ll have more success if you perceive your change through a positive lens. In an analysis of 129 studies of behaviour change strategies, one research group found that the least effective approaches to change were ones initiated by a sense of fear or regret.25

So, if you want to change your diet because you’re afraid of developing diabetes or that you might not be able to chase your kids or grandkids around someday, you’ll have a reduced chance of succeeding with that change, statistically speaking. Studies also show that changes are easier to make when they’re specific.26 Eating a Big Ass Salad for lunch every day is going to get you way further than saying “I need to start eating heathy.”

So, How Do You Make Change Easier?

Too often, we’re motivated by guilt, fear, or comparison. But experts agree that the best approach is one that’s rooted in self-motivation and positivity. With that in mind, here are 7 strategies I share with my own clients to help them feel more confident around making change.

  1. Know That Change is the Only Constant in Life
    We get so caught up in forcing things to stay the same (maintain the same weight, keep the same job, etc) that we end up making it harder on ourselves. Get comfortable with the idea that life is meant to change, and you’ll see that going with the flow is a lot better than forcing every aspect of your life.
  2. Reel Your Imagination Back In
    It’s easy to go off the deep end, imagining all the things that could happen once you start making this change. But, as the quote goes, “worry is a misuse of the imagination,” so try to stay in the moment. And while you’re at it, see if you can take the emotion out of what you’re thinking and maintain a neutral mindset.
  3. Focus on the Positive
    Instead of dwelling on the fact that you won’t be grabbing a muffin and OJ in the morning, think about what positives you could experience. Maybe you end up figuring out that you always felt lethargic after your daily gluten bomb. Or that you don’t miss the way you’d get hangry mid-morning. Or maybe you realize you love the smell of freshly cooked bacon in the morning.
  4. Get Specific
    Like I mentioned earlier, changes will happen much more easily (and be way less stressful) if you have a specific plan. Take a few minutes to decide what changes you want to make, how you’ll hold yourself accountable, and how you’ll know if you’re successful.
  5. Break it Down into Baby Steps
    Now that you know what specific change you’ll be making, break it down into small steps. Say you want to lower your stress level by meditating every morning. Literally write out the steps you’ll need to do to make it happen. Step 1 might be to download a guided meditation app the night before; step 2: set your alarm for 6am; step 3: sit on your yoga mat; step 4: sit and meditate. You get the idea.
  6. Don’t Change Everything at Once
    Even if you’re really motivated, if you change too many things at the same time, you’ll overtax your attention and compromise your long-term success. The body and brain love consistency and certainty, so when you do embark on a change, see if you can maintain most of your current routine, whether it’s walking the dog before work, watching your favorite TV shows at night, or keeping to the same sleep schedule.
  7. Realize You Don’t Have to Shout It from the Rooftops
    Some people love sharing their dietary plans and preferences with the world for accountability and support. For others, it just adds stress. You know yourself better than anyone else, and if declaring your breakup with bread causes a panic attack, feel free to keep it to yourself and work your way through those stages of change solo.

7 Ways to Make Change Less Stressful

Change can be a struggle. But it doesn’t have to be. Knowing that it’s a process makes it easier to pick yourself back up when you do slip up or fall off the wagon. Practice these strategies and before you know it, you’ll be swapping your toast and OJ routine for a tray of bacon and eggs for good.

  1. Know That Change is the Only Constant in Life
  2. Reel Your Imagination Back In
  3. Focus on the Positive
  4. Get Specific
  5. Break it Down into Baby Steps
  6. Don’t Change Everything at Once
  7. Realize You Don’t Have to Shout It from the Rooftops

Now it’s your turn! How do you deal with change?

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Maximum Sustained Power Training, or MSP https://www.marksdailyapple.com/maximum-sustained-power-training-or-msp/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/maximum-sustained-power-training-or-msp/#comments Wed, 28 Apr 2021 18:06:00 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=117839 There's a West LA gym called Sirens and Titans run by a very special coach named Jacques LeVore. This coach isn't the only reason to attend the gym—its entire staff is incredible and impressive—but he is the main reason I decided to invest. He devised a form of strength training for endurance athletes called Maximum Sustained Power Training, or MSP Training. I included it in my Primal Endurance book from several years back as a great way for dedicated endurance athletes to not just incorporate strength training without impeding their endurance performance but to actively improve it. MSP training is an effective way to train for anyone who wants to get stronger and generate more power for longer. If you want to play with your kids and keep up with them, bouncing on the trampoline and playing hide and seek and tag and tossing them up in the air, MSP can help you sustain your intensity. If you want to play pickup basketball or rec league sports, MSP will keep you going til the end. And yes, if you want to dominate the local 10k or run a marathon or complete a triathlon, you have to strength train, and maximum sustained power training is a great way to do it. First of all, why strength train as an endurance athlete? It builds better bones. Stronger, denser bones are better able to withstand the forces incurred through running, cycling, and other forms of endurance activity. It builds resilient joints. Lifting weights develops the connective tissue and joints in a way that basic endurance training can't do. Stronger joints and connective tissue means you can go for longer without getting injured. It improves form. The stronger you are, the better you'll be able to maintain proper form and technique when going long distances. Form breakdown doesn't just slow down your performance. It also increases your injury risk. It increases power. The stronger you are, the more power you can generate on the bike, on hills, on the track. That means faster times.   These are all great reasons to train in the weight room, and they also apply to people who aren't endurance athletes. Goes without saying. How to Do Maximum Sustained Power Training Here's how it goes. Let's say you're doing the deadlift. Figure out your five rep max for a lift. Now, if you're just starting out, you want to build your 5 rep max up to a respectable number. If you can only deadlift 100 pounds for 5 reps, try to push it up to 150 or 200 pounds. Or more. It all depends on where you're starting. Once you have your five rep max, use that weight for your first MSP workout. Lift for 3-4 reps. Rest for 30 seconds. Lift for 2 reps. Rest. Lift for 2. Rest. Repeat as many times as you can without failure. You can also do this with something like a vertical leap. Do 3-4 reps of max height jumps, rest, repeat, … Continue reading "Maximum Sustained Power Training, or MSP"

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There’s a West LA gym called Sirens and Titans run by a very special coach named Jacques LeVore. This coach isn’t the only reason to attend the gym—its entire staff is incredible and impressive—but he is the main reason I decided to invest. He devised a form of strength training for endurance athletes called Maximum Sustained Power Training, or MSP Training. I included it in my Primal Endurance book from several years back as a great way for dedicated endurance athletes to not just incorporate strength training without impeding their endurance performance but to actively improve it.

MSP training is an effective way to train for anyone who wants to get stronger and generate more power for longer. If you want to play with your kids and keep up with them, bouncing on the trampoline and playing hide and seek and tag and tossing them up in the air, MSP can help you sustain your intensity. If you want to play pickup basketball or rec league sports, MSP will keep you going til the end. And yes, if you want to dominate the local 10k or run a marathon or complete a triathlon, you have to strength train, and maximum sustained power training is a great way to do it.

First of all, why strength train as an endurance athlete?

It builds better bones. Stronger, denser bones are better able to withstand the forces incurred through running, cycling, and other forms of endurance activity.

It builds resilient joints. Lifting weights develops the connective tissue and joints in a way that basic endurance training can’t do. Stronger joints and connective tissue means you can go for longer without getting injured.

It improves form. The stronger you are, the better you’ll be able to maintain proper form and technique when going long distances. Form breakdown doesn’t just slow down your performance. It also increases your injury risk.

It increases power. The stronger you are, the more power you can generate on the bike, on hills, on the track. That means faster times.

 

These are all great reasons to train in the weight room, and they also apply to people who aren’t endurance athletes. Goes without saying.

How to Do Maximum Sustained Power Training

Here’s how it goes. Let’s say you’re doing the deadlift.

Figure out your five rep max for a lift.

Now, if you’re just starting out, you want to build your 5 rep max up to a respectable number. If you can only deadlift 100 pounds for 5 reps, try to push it up to 150 or 200 pounds. Or more. It all depends on where you’re starting.

Once you have your five rep max, use that weight for your first MSP workout.

Lift for 3-4 reps.

Rest for 30 seconds.

Lift for 2 reps.

Rest.

Lift for 2.

Rest.

Repeat as many times as you can without failure.

You can also do this with something like a vertical leap. Do 3-4 reps of max height jumps, rest, repeat, and stop once the height you’re able to jump is noticeably lower than when you started.

Avoiding failure is key. Always stop well short of failure. Each rep should feel crisp and clean and quick. You’re not struggling. You are moving a relatively heavy weight quickly and almost effortlessly. You are not taxing your central nervous system. You aren’t burning through a ton of calories. You’re leaving plenty in the tank. Once you feel yourself about to fail or the movement slows down considerably, it’s time to stop.

Endurance athletes who try to strength train like a CrossFitter or do high volume, high intensity hour and a half-long training sessions in the weight room almost invariably end up overtraining. It’s just too taxing. Very hard to recover and still perform on the track or on the bike.

Just like proper low level aerobic activity often feels “too easy,” MSP training might not feel like a “hard workout.” You won’t be drained afterwards. You’ll know you’ve lifted, but you won’t walk funny. There won’t be much soreness the next day. This is normal. This is expected.

MSP training is also a good option for older people who want to stimulate strength development and bone density without overtaxing their bodies. It’s a relatively quick way to train—doesn’t require hours in the gym. You could even structure MSP sets as little microworkouts throughout the day.

Now I’d love to hear from you. Have you ever done Maximum Sustained Power training? Will you? Let me know how it’s worked for you.

Take care, everyone.

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Thank Goodness for Failure! https://www.marksdailyapple.com/thank-goodness-for-failure/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/thank-goodness-for-failure/#comments Tue, 27 Apr 2021 16:23:45 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=117767 For our animal brethren, mistakes are very often fatal. Stockpiling too little food for the winter, zigging when they should have zagged to escape the predator’s clutches, or stepping awkwardly and breaking a leg could, and probably did, spell the end. For better or worse, we modern humans usually get to live with the consequences of our actions. We are around to deal with the aftermath of our mistakes. Even though most of our daily screw-ups are of little consequence in the big picture of life, they still feel awful. Our mammalian brains are wired to be highly averse to failure, pain, and social rejection, though they are unavoidable. As long as you’re living and breathing, you’re going to make mistakes, sometimes big ones. And if you’re really living—trying new things, boldly blazing a trail for yourself, taking big leaps—you will crash and burn sometimes. You’ll lose your shirt in a business deal gone wrong, someone you care about will break your heart, a perfect opportunity will pass you by because you didn’t pull the trigger at the right time.   I’m speaking from experience here. I like to think I have lived life boldly and to the fullest, and as a result, I have failed big more than a few times. And you know what? I’m profoundly grateful for those failures. Without exception, every failure was a crucial stepping stone to where I am today. From my vantage point as a not-young man (I’m not ready to call myself old yet), I can look back and honestly say that I wouldn’t be where I am today without failing. I’ll even take it a step further and say that I’m successful today because not only was I willing to fail, I embraced failure as a part of the journey. This isn’t to minimize the very real social and financial costs. Believe me, I have absorbed some excruciating losses in my day. If you’re in the throes of something catastrophic now, I’m certainly not telling you to cheer up and look on the bright side. No, but the reality is, time marches on. It can drag you kicking and screaming, or you can work to get your feet under you again and persevere. In every crisis, there comes a point where you have to ask, what’s next? Failure is never the end. You have one true ending in life. Everything else is a waystation on the path to the next thing. There is No Success without Failure The older I get, the more I appreciate failure. Nobody ever becomes successful without making mistakes, often huge ones. In fact, the individuals who rack up the most wins in life are also the ones who fail the most because they try the most. Professional baseball players strike out more than anyone on the planet because they see the most pitches and whiff on the most swings. Well-known comedians tell the worst jokes and bomb more often than their less successful colleagues because they … Continue reading "Thank Goodness for Failure!"

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For our animal brethren, mistakes are very often fatal. Stockpiling too little food for the winter, zigging when they should have zagged to escape the predator’s clutches, or stepping awkwardly and breaking a leg could, and probably did, spell the end.

For better or worse, we modern humans usually get to live with the consequences of our actions. We are around to deal with the aftermath of our mistakes. Even though most of our daily screw-ups are of little consequence in the big picture of life, they still feel awful. Our mammalian brains are wired to be highly averse to failure, pain, and social rejection, though they are unavoidable. As long as you’re living and breathing, you’re going to make mistakes, sometimes big ones.

And if you’re really living—trying new things, boldly blazing a trail for yourself, taking big leaps—you will crash and burn sometimes. You’ll lose your shirt in a business deal gone wrong, someone you care about will break your heart, a perfect opportunity will pass you by because you didn’t pull the trigger at the right time.

 

I’m speaking from experience here. I like to think I have lived life boldly and to the fullest, and as a result, I have failed big more than a few times. And you know what? I’m profoundly grateful for those failures. Without exception, every failure was a crucial stepping stone to where I am today. From my vantage point as a not-young man (I’m not ready to call myself old yet), I can look back and honestly say that I wouldn’t be where I am today without failing.

I’ll even take it a step further and say that I’m successful today because not only was I willing to fail, I embraced failure as a part of the journey. This isn’t to minimize the very real social and financial costs. Believe me, I have absorbed some excruciating losses in my day. If you’re in the throes of something catastrophic now, I’m certainly not telling you to cheer up and look on the bright side.

No, but the reality is, time marches on. It can drag you kicking and screaming, or you can work to get your feet under you again and persevere. In every crisis, there comes a point where you have to ask, what’s next? Failure is never the end. You have one true ending in life. Everything else is a waystation on the path to the next thing.

There is No Success without Failure

The older I get, the more I appreciate failure. Nobody ever becomes successful without making mistakes, often huge ones. In fact, the individuals who rack up the most wins in life are also the ones who fail the most because they try the most. Professional baseball players strike out more than anyone on the planet because they see the most pitches and whiff on the most swings. Well-known comedians tell the worst jokes and bomb more often than their less successful colleagues because they step on stage and push the limits. Lightbulb inventor Thomas Edison supposedly said, “I have not failed 10,000 times—I’ve successfully found 10,000 ways that will not work.”

Even people who are objectively successful in one domain may be abject failures in another. Consider the stereotypical workaholic who builds an eight-figure business, but their kids barely know what they look like.

No matter how you define them, success, achievement, or “winning” only happen for people who are willing to put themselves out there, make themselves vulnerable, and be in situations where failure is a very real possibility. This holds true whether we’re talking about relationships, parenting, starting a business, working for someone else, or trying a new hobby. Variables outside your control derail your best-laid plans. Worst-case scenarios come to pass. When that happens, you have to be ready to pivot.

Pivoting

I talk about the concept of pivoting in Keto for Life. Pivoting means adapting on the fly when life throws you a curveball. The ability to pivot is the ultimate expression of mental flexibility, one of the pillars of living a long and healthy life.

Ben Franklin said that nothing is certain except death and taxes, but I say we add failure to that list. Your perfectly constructed diet and exercise routine work until menopause strikes and knocks everything out of whack. Your job is ideal until the company brings someone new onboard who torpedoes your cushy situation. Your business idea is flawless until the supply chain breaks down. As much as failures hurt at first, they are always opportunities to be nimble and find a new path forward as long as you’re willing and able to pivot.

My path through life has been non-traditional, to say the least. Among the many jobs I’ve held are elite athlete, coach, sportscaster, anti-doping czar, TV host, blogger, and author. I’ve started businesses painting houses, selling shoe repair kits, peddling frozen yogurt, producing and marketing high-potency supplements, publishing books (my own and others’), and, most recently, disrupting the condiment world. A few of my ventures were successful beyond my expectations. Others failed spectacularly. Some I simply moved on from in order to pursue new opportunities.

From the outside, it may look like my path was a series of stops and starts, abrupt left-hand turns, and a few somersaults. To me, there is a clear narrative of how I got from the scrawny kid who mowed lawns in junior high to the man I am today. Sure, there were some significant pivots along the way. By and large, each one followed an event that could reasonably be called a failure.

Failure isn’t just an opportunity for change, it’s a catalyst for change. Nothing lights a fire under my butt like failing at something. The trick is to avoid getting sucked into despair. The immediate aftermath of failure is painful and sometimes embarrassing, no doubt about that. However, once the initial suckiness subsides, a new world of possibilities opens up. You know the saying “one door closes and another opens.” Well, I say one door closes and two more open. And you get to walk through them with all the newfound wisdom you gained from your previous mistakes.

The only way to avoid failure is never to try anything. That’s the biggest mistake of all, as far as I’m concerned.

So let’s agree: Failure is inevitable. You can fight it and be miserable, or you can embrace it, learn from it, pivot when necessary, and be happy and successful in the long run. That’s all there is to it.

How to Fail Successfully

No, that’s not an oxymoron. I didn’t get to where I am today by succeeding at every turn. I got to where I am today—happy marriage, terrific kids and grandkid, thriving businesses, best-selling books, Primal community I’m incredibly proud of—by failing successfully.

Each and every one of my failures built me into the man I am today, but it didn’t have to be that way. At any juncture, I could have thrown in the towel and abandoned what I knew to be my mission and passion. I could have taken a more traditional road, working a corporate job to build up my 401k until I had enough to retire comfortably. That’s right for some people, but not for me; I was destined to carve my own winding path through life. Along the way, the ups and downs of my chosen path taught me a lot about what it takes to fail successfully.

Open-mindedness and Curiosity

Don’t cling too tightly to your ideas about what success could look like. Pose more questions and consider more possibilities. Instead of banging your head against a wall trying to make your current plan work, ask yourself, “What have I learned from plan A that I could apply to plan B, C, D, E?”

I think I’m pretty risk-averse, but I’m also intensely curious about what will happen if I just try. That’s propelled me to take leaps when other people would have stayed put. Australian poet Erin Hanson captured it perfectly in her much-memed sentiment, “There is freedom waiting for you, on the breezes of the sky. And you ask, ‘What if I fall?’ Oh, but my darling, ‘What if you fly?’”

Lack of Ego and Attachment to Outcomes

A few years ago, I embarked on a business venture that turned out to be a disaster. Looking back, I can see how it all went wrong. Heck, if I’m being honest, I saw the train wreck unfolding in slow motion as it was happening. There were many times my gut said, “Cut bait, Sisson!” but I ignored it. I dug my heels in deeper and poured more money into the project. Why? Because I was too attached to the outcome. I was too determined to make it work at all costs, and cost me it did.

As that great American philosopher Kenny Rogers imparted to us in song, “You gotta know when to fold ’em.” Absolutely, be optimistic and believe in your purpose and your projects. Also be pragmatic. Let go of ego and listen to the smart people around you. Listen to the voice inside your head.

In this particular case, I took a big swing, and I missed. It was painful at the time, personally and financially. But you know what? Disentangling myself from that venture freed up the time and mental space I needed to redouble my efforts with Primal Kitchen foods, which is where my true passion was anyway. In hindsight, I should have walked away sooner.

Some Hubris

Be your own biggest fan. Truly believe you have something of value to offer the world.

Throughout my career, my most successful projects were the ones that best aligned with my core values and mission. My life goal was never to become a blogger or an author or a mayonnaise baron. I wanted to empower people to #LiveAwesome. Along the way, I discovered that blogging, writing books, and creating amazing food products were the avenues by which I could reach the most people.

At every juncture, my belief in my ability to fulfill that mission—to help as many people as possible reach their maximum potential and enjoy life to the fullest—was unwavering. Your specific purpose may be entirely different, but it’s just as important. Keep the faith, and you’ll keep finding your way.

Self-compassion

There’s no use beating yourself up when things go wrong. You can’t see the big picture when you’re focused on what an idiot you are for screwing up. Acknowledge the suffering that failure causes, remind yourself that it’s a part of life, and do your best to learn and move forward.

Perspective

Probably because failing is such an aversive experience, we tend to exaggerate our definition of failure. There is a big difference between making a mistake and failing. I have made countless mistakes in my life, but I have only truly failed a handful of times. And guess what, I’m still here to tell the tale. Why? Because even the most painful, most humiliating, most costly failures are rarely catastrophic in the long run. People do end up financially ruined or with their reputations destroyed, but those are the exceptions, not the rules. Don’t blow relatively minor hiccups out of proportion or they will become bigger than they need to be.

One of the biggest regrets people have is lost time. “I wasted so much time on that project/business/relationship.” That’s the wrong way to think about it. You invested time and didn’t get the payout you hoped for or expected. That time was not wasted as long as you learned something you can apply to your next venture.

In any case, there’s little value in looking backward. Regret is a waste of time. Only look back as much as necessary to glean the appropriate lessons from your past mistakes, and then turn around and face forward again.

Oh, and try to avoid making the same mistakes twice.

Don’t Worry About the Future

If I can leave you with one piece of wisdom I’ve gleaned from nearly seven decades spinning through space, it’s this: The future is coming no matter what you do today, and there is only so much you can do to prepare. Your energy is better spent focusing on the here and now. Do what you can to improve your life, be happy and fulfilled, and contribute to the world today. I don’t necessarily believe that “everything happens for a reason” in some big cosmic sense, but I do believe that everything is perfect. Things ultimately happen at just the right time for you if you’re always working on being true to yourself now.

Everything will be ok.

Thanks for reading, everyone. What are the biggest lessons you’ve learned from failures in your life?

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Transitioning from Vegetarianism and Becoming Less and Less Dependent on Medications: Polly Wolfe’s Success Story https://www.marksdailyapple.com/transitioning-from-vegetarianism-and-becoming-less-and-less-dependent-on-medications-polly-wolfes-success-story/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/transitioning-from-vegetarianism-and-becoming-less-and-less-dependent-on-medications-polly-wolfes-success-story/#comments Mon, 26 Apr 2021 18:47:12 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=117842 Today, we have another Success Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community, please contact me here. Thank you for reading! Hi, Mark! Type 2 diabetes runs in my family big time, so this was the impetus for getting healthy. Learning about Primal and the keto diet helped me do it. I have lost 27 pounds since my bloodwork showed I was prediabetic. I didn't understand insulin resistance, and I was headed that way. I had neuropathy in my feet, but I didn't know what it was. It's gone now. I had knee pain. Gone. I have arthritis starting in my finger — no issues with it now. My triglycerides were super high and my protein was low. I've been a vegetarian half my life (now 62, female). It's very easy to become carb addicted as a vegetarian and not eat enough protein. I have always found meat gross, and going back to eating it isn't really an option, though I do eat tuna fish again now and am going to try salmon. This diet changed my life! I bought the strips, and I'm in ketosis! I have never eaten so well. I'm never really hungry, and I have more energy than I've had in years! I'm happy again. I'm strong again. I'm in charge of my health. Also, I have been doing the HIIT workouts. Love them. They give me a boost to get things done. I lost 30 lbs. between the two photos. The last 10 is coming off very slowly, but my cholesterol improved and my triglycerides went from 230 to 114, from prediabetic to normal. The best news, my thyroid meds have been cut in half as has my diuretic. My blood pressure just went up, and it seems that is because I don't need all the thyroid med I'm getting. My NP says I may very well get off all my meds. (I had to suggest the med changes to my NP, based upon videos and googling information. The office is short on help, and she is overworked. It's important to find people who have the data!) Thanks for all you do to educate people about this life-changing way of eating! I've watched your interview with Tom Bilyeu at least 4 times to fully understand the science of keto. As a retired high school English teacher, I teach people through my FB page because there is nothing better than knowing you are changing people's lives in the most important way. It is the only way to live. I've gotten friends to try keto, too. One friend has lost 18 pounds in 6 weeks! In health, Polly Wolfe P.s. Update on meds: I am off the diuretic. I am weaning off a beta blocker that was robbing me of magnesium, which caused my blood pressure to go up! I am now on 5 mg of Lisinopril, … Continue reading "Transitioning from Vegetarianism and Becoming Less and Less Dependent on Medications: Polly Wolfe’s Success Story"

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success storiesToday, we have another Success Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community, please contact me here. Thank you for reading!

Hi, Mark!

Type 2 diabetes runs in my family big time, so this was the impetus for getting healthy. Learning about Primal and the keto diet helped me do it.

I have lost 27 pounds since my bloodwork showed I was prediabetic. I didn’t understand insulin resistance, and I was headed that way. I had neuropathy in my feet, but I didn’t know what it was. It’s gone now. I had knee pain. Gone. I have arthritis starting in my finger — no issues with it now.

My triglycerides were super high and my protein was low. I’ve been a vegetarian half my life (now 62, female). It’s very easy to become carb addicted as a vegetarian and not eat enough protein. I have always found meat gross, and going back to eating it isn’t really an option, though I do eat tuna fish again now and am going to try salmon.

This diet changed my life! I bought the strips, and I’m in ketosis! I have never eaten so well. I’m never really hungry, and I have more energy than I’ve had in years! I’m happy again. I’m strong again. I’m in charge of my health. Also, I have been doing the HIIT workouts. Love them. They give me a boost to get things done.

I lost 30 lbs. between the two photos. The last 10 is coming off very slowly, but my cholesterol improved and my triglycerides went from 230 to 114, from prediabetic to normal.

The best news, my thyroid meds have been cut in half as has my diuretic. My blood pressure just went up, and it seems that is because I don’t need all the thyroid med I’m getting. My NP says I may very well get off all my meds. (I had to suggest the med changes to my NP, based upon videos and googling information. The office is short on help, and she is overworked. It’s important to find people who have the data!)

Thanks for all you do to educate people about this life-changing way of eating! I’ve watched your interview with Tom Bilyeu at least 4 times to fully understand the science of keto. As a retired high school English teacher, I teach people through my FB page because there is nothing better than knowing you are changing people’s lives in the most important way. It is the only way to live. I’ve gotten friends to try keto, too. One friend has lost 18 pounds in 6 weeks!

In health,

Polly Wolfe

P.s. Update on meds: I am off the diuretic. I am weaning off a beta blocker that was robbing me of magnesium, which caused my blood pressure to go up! I am now on 5 mg of Lisinopril, and I will very likely be off that in the near future.

Amazing work, Polly. I know it couldn’t have been easy to make changes alongside so many physical issues. Thanks for believing in yourself. We post stories like yours so that others can see that change is possible, too!

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Black Charcoal Detox Latte Recipe https://www.marksdailyapple.com/black-charcoal-detox-latte-recipe/ https://www.marksdailyapple.com/black-charcoal-detox-latte-recipe/#comments Sat, 24 Apr 2021 16:00:46 +0000 https://www.marksdailyapple.com/?p=117800 You've had emerald green matcha lattes, vibrant golden turmeric lattes ... why not try a smoky black charcoal latte?

Activated charcoal is a trendy ingredient that you're seeing in coffee drinks, ice creams, and even in specialty cocktails all over town. The charcoal adds a mysterious dusky hue to anything it touches, but there are reasons people are reaching for charcoal that go beyond the visuals.

Some people keep activated charcoal on hand for the occasional bout of digestive upset, and it has quite the reputation for relieving bloat in some people. Others are after its detoxifying effect, claiming that they notice a difference in their skin clarity.
Charcoal, Nutrients, and Medications
When consuming charcoal, it’s very important to take it away from food and vitamins, and stay hydrated. If you're on any medication, ask your doctor about consuming charcoal, because the charcoal could decrease the effect of some medicines.
How Does Activated Charcoal Taste?
You may wonder if breaking open an activated charcoal capsule into your latte will make it taste like your backyard BBQ. Rest assured, it doesn't. The activated charcoal doesn't add much flavor-wise, and it certainly doesn't taste burnt, as you might expect it to.

That's great news for this activated charcoal latte. You'll taste cozy vanilla and creamy, frothy milk, lightly sweetened. And who knows, your skin may take on a glow afterward.

Let's make one.
Activated Charcoal Black Detox Latte Recipe

Ingredients

Contents of 2 activated charcoal pills, or about 3/4 tsp. charcoal powder
1 cup milk of choice (we used full fat almond milk)
1 scoop of unflavored collagen powder
Sweetener of choice, to taste
1/4 tsp. Vanilla extract
Pinch of salt, optional

Directions
Warm the milk in a small saucepan. Add the charcoal, sweetener and vanilla extract and whisk until combined.

 

Pour the mixture into a mug. Use a frothing wand to blend until frothy. Enjoy immediately.

Nutrition Info* (per latte)
*Will vary based on the type of milk and sweetener you use

Calories: 133
Sugar: 1.5g
Sodium: 160.1mg
Fat: 11g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Monounsaturated Fat: 0
Polyunsaturated Fat: 0
Trans Fat: 0g
Carbs: 3.1g
Net Carbs: 3.1g
Fiber: 0
Protein: 5g
Cholesterol: 0mg

The post Black Charcoal Detox Latte Recipe appeared first on Mark's Daily Apple.

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You’ve had emerald green matcha lattes, vibrant golden turmeric lattes … why not try a smoky black charcoal latte?

Activated charcoal is a trendy ingredient that you’re seeing in coffee drinks, ice creams, and even in specialty cocktails all over town. The charcoal adds a mysterious dusky hue to anything it touches, but there are reasons people are reaching for charcoal that go beyond the visuals.

Some people keep activated charcoal on hand for the occasional bout of digestive upset, and it has quite the reputation for relieving bloat in some people. Others are after its detoxifying effect, claiming that they notice a difference in their skin clarity.

Charcoal, Nutrients, and Medications

When consuming charcoal, it’s very important to take it away from food and vitamins, and stay hydrated. If you’re on any medication, ask your doctor about consuming charcoal, because the charcoal could decrease the effect of some medicines.

How Does Activated Charcoal Taste?

You may wonder if breaking open an activated charcoal capsule into your latte will make it taste like your backyard BBQ. Rest assured, it doesn’t. The activated charcoal doesn’t add much flavor-wise, and it certainly doesn’t taste burnt, as you might expect it to.

That’s great news for this activated charcoal latte. You’ll taste cozy vanilla and creamy, frothy milk, lightly sweetened. And who knows, your skin may take on a glow afterward.

Let’s make one.

Activated Charcoal Black Detox Latte Recipe

Ingredients

  • Contents of 2 activated charcoal pills, or about 3/4 tsp. charcoal powder
  • 1 cup milk of choice (we used full fat almond milk)
  • 1 scoop of unflavored collagen powder
  • Sweetener of choice, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt, optional

Directions

Warm the milk in a small saucepan. Add the charcoal, sweetener and vanilla extract and whisk until combined.

 

Pour the mixture into a mug. Use a frothing wand to blend until frothy. Enjoy immediately.

Print

Black Charcoal Detox Latte Recipe


  • Author: Mark's Daily Apple
  • Prep Time: 2
  • Cook Time: 3
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 latte
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Creamy, frothy black detox latte made with activated charcoal, vanilla, and a hint of sweetness.


Ingredients

Contents of 2 activated charcoal pills, or about ¾ tsp. Charcoal powder
1 cup milk of choice (we used full fat almond milk)
Sweetener of choice
¼ tsp. Vanilla extract
Pinch of salt, optional


Instructions

Warm the milk in a small saucepan. Add the charcoal, sweetener and vanilla extract and whisk until combined.

Pour the mixture into a mug. Use a frothing wand to blend until frothy. Enjoy immediately

Notes

If you’re on medication or have vitamin or mineral deficiencies, ask your doctor before consuming charcoal.

Sugar content varies based on the sweetener you choose.

  • Category: Beverages
  • Method: Stovetop

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 latte
  • Calories: 133
  • Sugar: 1.5 g
  • Sodium: 160.1 mg
  • Fat: 11 g
  • Saturated Fat: 1 g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 0
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 3.1 g
  • Fiber: 0
  • Protein: 5 g
  • Cholesterol: 0

Keywords: goth latte, black latte, charcoal latte, detox latte

Nutrition Info* (per latte)

*Will vary based on the type of milk and sweetener you use

Calories: 133
Sugar: 1.5g
Sodium: 160.1mg
Fat: 11g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Monounsaturated Fat: 0
Polyunsaturated Fat: 0
Trans Fat: 0g
Carbs: 3.1g
Net Carbs: 3.1g
Fiber: 0
Protein: 5g
Cholesterol: 0mg

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