Stay Connected

Work Is Weird

A Monday Moment I just had a funny email exchange with friend and fellow Apple “D” (in case her boss is reading…sheesh). We were catching up on our weekend adventures, and she capped the conversation with “Well, I guess I better stop emailing and get to work. You mean I’m not just here for the free internet?” This is an interesting, if inadvertent, revelation of the problem with work in America today. I’m going to share my thoughts about it, because I think the impact of work on health is sorely overlooked on a lot of health blogs (and that’s what my Monday Moment is all about – plus, it gives you five minutes to slack off). Food and fitness are arguably the most important factors in optimizing our health, but what are we gonna do with that healthy body and mind? We spend most of our time at work, so this is important. Just who is doing all this blog writing, reading, linking and bookmarking? In a society where IM has become a verb, just how productive are we? (Hmm…wonder what those Bees are up to…) It’s amazing how blogs and chats and forums are so massively successful in terms of participation. We are a pretty overworked society – no wonder people are IMing (my grammar teacher is turning in her grave right now). No wonder people are signing up for Ambien and Lunesta like it’s candy corn. There’s no time to chill out, chat, and just be. Entrepreneurs and business brains alike fret over the lack of productivity with workers, but so far, only a few companies get it (“D” hit the nail right on the head). I’m not sure what the source of the problem is, but I’ve got some ideas: – Literally depressing lighting. – Too much to do – and too much busy work. – Face it, work can feel like a prison. Just like school, workers have rules, procedures, and systems to follow. If you need a nap, want to work in a different way, or just have an idea, you might as well be an alien. No wonder people are stressed out and bummed out – they’re micro-managed to death. – Furniture and space are boring, standardized and offer little privacy. – Being made to feel like a kid, instead of a man or woman of value. – Feeling pointless, in short. But when you comment on a blog or join a forum, suddenly, your voice matters. Is it any wonder we’re all talking? We’ve all got something to say! No wonder people are having a surreptitious blast with the internet. As a business owner myself, I’m baffled by the way things are done in America. Have we forgotten that business is really just people hanging out and doing stuff? (Operative word being people). And what’s with playing dress-up? I like a fine Italian suit as much as the next man, but there’s something macabre about the whole world of work we create … Continue reading “Work Is Weird”

Read More

Healthy Tastes Great!

Broccoli with Fennel and Red Bell Pepper

Read More

Sick of Cereal?

Smart Fuel If you’re sick of cereal, or simply want to follow a healthy diet that is low in sugar and refined grains, you’re in the right place. There are plenty of alternatives to, well, the alternative: eggs, eggs and more eggs. 1. Blueberries ‘n Cream Why pour processed, sugary low-fat milk over dry little grain flakes when you can pour luscious cream over blueberries bursting with antioxidants and flavor? We think cereal is kind of sad (and the stuff they do to make low-fat milk is pretty unappealing). You’ll love blueberries ‘n cream if you’re getting tired of eggs for breakfast. This high-fiber treat also provides some fat (great for those sensitive morning tummies). Toss in other fruit like strawberries for additional variety. The Pack Flickr Photo Prep Tips: Buy frozen blueberries – they’re inexpensive and actually work better for many recipes, including this one. Thaw a cup of blueberries overnight in the fridge or pop them into the microwave for about 30 seconds. They’ll be cold, like cereal, but not frozen – who wants a brain freeze at 7 a.m.? Drain them carefully. Pour about 1 ounce of cream over the fruit – not too much. Cream, while high in nutrients and fat, is also high in calories. We recommend raw or organic cream, of course! Garnish with a little cinnamon, nutmeg or a few drops of vanilla extract for a delicious breakfast that provides more fiber than cereal, fewer carbs, and just tastes amazing! Be sure to brush your teeth afterwards, or everyone will think you’ve been nursing a blue popsicle addiction. 2. Plain Yogurt Parfait Look for Greek, Mediterranean or “European style” yogurt. It’s so rich, you’ll think you’ve died and gone to cream cheese heaven. What can we say? We love fat around these here parts. European yogurt has less of the stuff you don’t want (chemicals, additives, sugars) and more of the stuff you do want (rich texture, flavor, and nutrients). Be sure to get the plain, unsweetened kind. Shutterberry Flickrstream Photo Prep Tips: You’ll want to eat just a few tablespoons of this yummy stuff, as it’s really filling. Boost the fat and protein with some fiber by adding a half-cup of any fresh or frozen fruit of your choice. We like frozen mango chunks (thawed) and fresh raspberries. Elliott and Sara both keep their freezers stocked with all kinds of delicious frozen fruits, so it’s easy to make a healthy breakfast even when you’re in a rush. Next step: toss a handful of unsalted, high-quality nuts like almonds, hazelnuts, filberts, or walnuts into the mix. This little protein boost will also provide you with a great Omega-3 fatty counterpoint to the saturated fat in the yogurt. And evidence increasingly suggests that it’s the balance of saturated to unsaturated fat that is so important to good health and longevity. You can go all out and make a true parfait if you want, by layering in a glass cup or dish. But if you … Continue reading “Sick of Cereal?”

Read More

Abbott Labs, Chickenpox, & Couch Potatoes

Worker Bees’ Daily Bites:

Here’s your daily dose of the latest and greatest from the world of health! We skip the sensational stories (please, no more Anna Nicole DNA testing news! There is stuff going on in the world!). Today, we bring you the most compelling, useful…and, yes, bizarre health news.

To wit: evidently, furniture may be making people obese. You’ll want to click it out, kids.

Big Pharma and Thailand: Smackdown

Abbott Labs (the same folks who proudly market unhealthy junk food to children and lie to parents about it) is furious with Thailand for having the gall to look out for its impoverished, AIDS-wracked population. If you think the situation in Africa is bad, take a look at what Abbott is doing in Thailand. Seriously, between happily creating a nation of tiny diabetics at home and knowingly keeping medicine from poverty-stricken human beings abroad, just how do these guys sleep at night? Even bees know that’s wrong.

Is Your Couch Making You Fat?

It gives new meaning to the term “couch potato”. It appears that the flame retardants used in many fabrics and furniture cushions may be contributing to insulin resistance and obesity. Click it out!

The Law of Unintended Consequences

Sometimes putting out one fire creates another. That’s certainly the case with many drug therapies. Kindergarten teachers everywhere groan: the chickenpox vaccine is losing its effectiveness.

Studiously Avoiding Vegetables? We Ace That Test!

All right! We’re #1…in avoiding fruits and vegetables. Unlike the U.K., which, despite being the country that invented fried fish and chips and such breakfast treats as canned beans on toast, manages to meet its health goals, we still vehemently refuse to eat enough salad. Well, except you, Apples. Right?

Read More

From Pharma, with Love

“The measures reflect a growing body of research about discrepancies between journal articles and the full results of the studies behind them. Journal editors are also responding to the escalating debate in Washington on ensuring drug side effects are properly disclosed. In the wake of the withdrawal of Merck & Co.’s painkiller Vioxx over cardiovascular side effects, some legislators are calling for tougher safety scrutiny of drugs on the market. The JAMA study last year said articles often cherry-picked strong results to report, even if those results were in a different area than the study was designed to test. Typically scientists set up clinical trials to answer one or two primary questions — for example, whether a drug reduces the risk of a heart attack and stroke. These are called the primary outcomes. The JAMA study found that 62% of trials had at least one primary outcome that was changed, added or omitted.” (Source: the Wall Street Journal) UPDATE 3/25/07: We have removed our spoof image of JAMA’s cover because some of our readers have alerted us that, upon closer inspection, the thumbnail of the JAMA issue, which depicts a cartoon examination scene, contains nudity. This was a complete, unintentional oops on our part! No offense was intended. (Though we have to wonder…why on earth is JAMA putting these sorts of depictions in their cover art in the first place?) It’s no surprise anymore that the major medical journals are plastered with pharmaceutical advertisements – after all, when was the last time you visited a doctor’s office that wasn’t drowning in pharmaceutical marketing widgets? Nor is it a surprise that the very studies in medical journals (not the advertisements) are deceptively skewed in Big Pharma’s favor about two-thirds of the time. I would think physicians and researchers would be appalled by the replete corruption. But when your own federal government spends more time telling you that vitamins are deadly – because a handful of terminally ill patients weren’t able to stave off inevitable death with a dose of knowingly worthless synthetic E – than it does being concerned about 60,000+ deaths from one drug alone, is it any wonder? That’s a lot of people – that’s more than many entire cities! For decent people, it’s just a natural inclination to trust authorities claiming to be both knowledgeable and ethical. After all, that’s what we’re paying them for. The problem is, the pharmaceutical companies are paying them more – to the tune of 19 billion dollars. I have no doubt that many people working in the pharmaceutical industry are there with the best of intentions. I am not against drugs necessary to improve and save lives, of which there are many successes. But I do have a problem with an overly-lenient and largely voluntary drug approval process that is a mockery of ethical standards. Because we trust journals and doctors so implicitly, we forget that, like any business, pharmaceuticals are in it for the money. It’s just business. Sometimes, the business … Continue reading “From Pharma, with Love”

Read More

Healthy Tastes Great!

Raspberry Turkey Salad with Shirataki Noodles

Read More