The Secret to Achieving Any Health Goal is All in Your Mind

Around here, we talk a lot about the stories we tell ourselves. You know, the limiting beliefs and thoughts that constantly dance around in our brains, preventing us from achieving our health goals. “I’m a terrible cook.” “I never have time to exercise.” “I’ll always be heavy.” Or, “I’m too lazy to stick to a plan.”
Why do you create limiting beliefs?
As humans, we’re wired to create narratives that string together the picked-apart aspects of our lives in a way that rings true for us. It might be things we heard our parents say or experiences we had growing up. Or even interpretations of those things and experiences. According to psychologists at Northwestern University, the narratives we create become a form of our identity — an identity that not only reflects who we think we are, but also what we believe we’re capable of achieving.

Just FYI, these are the false narratives and limiting beliefs you tell yourself and anyone else who will listen. As a veteran health coach, I know this drill firsthand.

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Fasting with a Cold: How Does Fasting Impact Viral and Bacterial Infections

Fasting is a great tool for so many things. You can use it to regulate food intake and lose body fat. Fasting can help you shift body composition, normalize your appetite, and gain control over your relationship to food. Many people report cognitive enhancements from fasting, and it’s a surefire way to speed up the transition into ketosis and full-blown fat adaptation. There’s strong evidence that we look, feel, and perform best skipping the occasional meal—that it’s the evolutionary norm for humans not to have constant, unceasing access to food. After all, we didn’t always have 24 hour grocery stores and fast food restaurants. But what about fasting with a cold?

And what about intermittent fasting and the immune system? Should you fast at all when you’re sick? What about fasting with the flu? Or how about bacterial infections—can fasting help with those? These are actually some of the most common questions I receive. Because intermittent fasting seems to help with so many other conditions, it makes sense to wonder about its relationship to the immune response.

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Carb Refeeds for Women: Do They Help With Fat Loss?

One of the more common questions we get in the Keto Reset Facebook community is, “How do I break through a weight-loss plateau?”

Stalls are frustrating. You’re cruising along on your Primal or Primal + keto diet, and then wham—you hit a wall. It’s all a totally normal and expected part of the weight loss process. Weight loss is never linear. There are always downs, ups, and flat spots.

In fact, if you’ve been losing weight for a while, and then you stall out for a week or two, I wouldn’t even consider that a plateau necessarily. Your body might keep losing weight on its own if you give it time and don’t stress about it. Still, I get it, you’re eager to kick-start the weight loss again.

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How to Make Pemmican

If you’ve ever had a meat or jerky bar made of finely chopped dried meat and perhaps berries, you may be familiar with pemmican. Pemmican consists of lean, dried meat – usually beef nowadays, but bison, deer, and elk were common back in the day) which is crushed to a powder and mixed with an equal amount of hot, rendered fat, usually beef tallow. Sometimes crushed, dried berries are added as well. For long periods of time, people can subsist entirely on pemmican, drawing on the fat for energy and the protein for strength, and glucose, when needed.

Vihljamur Stefansson, eminent anthropologist and arctic explorer, went on three expeditions into the Alaskan tundra during the first quarter of the 20th century. His discoveries – including the “blond” Inuit and previously uncharted Arctic lands – brought him renown on the world stage. People were fascinated by his approach to travel and exploration, the way he thrust himself fully into the native Inuit cultures he encountered. Stefansson studied their language, adopted their ways, and ate the same food they ate. In fact, it was the diet of the Inuit – fish, marine mammals, and other animals, with almost no vegetables or carbohydrates – that most intrigued him. He noted that, though their diet would be considered nutritionally bereft by most “experts” (hey, nothing’s changed in a hundred years!), the Inuit seemed to be in excellent health, with strong teeth, bones, and muscles. He was particularly interested pemmican.

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Learning to Love Liver (with Middle Eastern Lamb Liver and Liver Paté Recipe)

Today’s guest post is written by Terry Wahls, M.D., Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner, clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and author of The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine (paperback). You may be familiar with her recovery story, featured here. 

 

I heard a lot of you want to know more about liver! I’m glad you are curious. Liver is great for you, and you need only eat 6 to 8 ounces per week to gain its benefits. I limit liver because it is quite high in retinol, which is the active form of vitamin A. Retinol is involved in the management of cell differentiation and immune function. Carotenoids in colorful fruits and vegetables can be converted to retinol; however, the efficiency of these enzymes depends on the efficiency of Beta-carotene 15’-15’ oxygenase, which varies based on one’s underlying genetics. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms have a 70% reduction in the efficiency of this conversion.

Inadequate levels of vitamin A are associated with higher rates of dysplasia, infection, and autoimmunity. It is likely that patients with chronic infections, autoimmunity, dysplasia, or cancers have a higher requirement for vitamin A intake than someone who is healthy. But scientists have not determined the optimal intake for those with infection, autoimmunity, dysplasia, or cancer.

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Keto Angel Food Cake

For whatever reason, angel food cake seems to make its yearly debut during that time when warmer weather breaks. Is it the toppings – fresh berries, or a perfectly ripe peach? Is it those first rays of sunshine after a cold winter that make you want something pillowy soft and sweet? There could be a hundred reasons why angel food cake is a slice of spring on a plate. Angel food cake may be something you considered a cheat, until now. Traditional angel food cake recipes call for a lot of sugar – since there’s no frosting, the cake has to be sweet on its own. This keto angel food cake recipe gives you all of the light, airy sweetness without the aftermath that comes with a sugary dessert. And, it’s surprisingly easy to make. Proper whisking of the egg whites can be intimidating, but you won’t mess it up. The key is to stop whisking when you get “soft peaks.” You’ll know you’re there when you can make small rolling hills in your egg white mixture by slowly lifting your whisk out of the bowl. Here’s how to do it. Keto Angel Food Cake Recipe Serves: 6 Time in the kitchen: 25 minutes, including 15 minutes bake time Ingredients 1/2 cup almond flour 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp. Lakanto powdered monkfruit 2:1 sweetener 3 Tbsp. coconut flour pinch of salt 9 large egg whites 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3/4 tsp. cream of tartar coconut whipped cream, chopped dark chocolate, or fresh berries (optional) Directions Prior to whisking up the egg whites, preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a 8” cake pan with parchment paper. Mix the almond flour, granulated monk fruit sweetener, coconut flour and a pinch of salt in a small bowl and set aside. Crack the egg whites in a clean, dry mixing bowl. Whisk vigorously with a whisk or hand mixer until the mixture becomes very frothy. Add the cream of tartar and vanilla extract and continue whisking vigorously. You want to continue whisking until the egg whites become just slightly stiff and form soft peaks when you lift up the whisk. Once the egg whites look white, instead of clear, and you can make peaks on the surface with your whisk, carefully fold the dry ingredients into the egg whites with a flexible spatula, adding the dry ingredients a little at a time until the batter is mixed. Do this gently to prevent the egg whites from collapsing. Quickly pour the batter into the lined round pan and place it into the oven. Bake for 15-17 minutes, or until the cake begins to brown on top and the center feels firm. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool. Top your cake slices with dollops of coconut cream, chopped dark chocolate and fresh strawberries. Tips For a Perfect Keto Angel Food Cake The whisked egg whites are delicate, so gently (but quickly) fold in the dry ingredients and place … Continue reading “Keto Angel Food Cake”

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