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Why You Need to Believe It Before You Can See It

We all love a good success story, don’t we? Hearing how someone dropped 70 pounds. Or got super fit. Or ditched their meds. They make it look so easy. Heck, all you have to do is clear out the pantry and stock it with primal-friendly foods and you’re golden.

Except that’s not how it works for most people. Most people operate from a point of view that prevents them from seeing the results they’re working so hard to obtain. How many times have you said to yourself, “I’ll be happy once I’m wearing a smaller size.” Or “When I lose the weight, I’ll be more confident.”

In my experience, the biggest difference between folks who continually crush their goals and those who always seem to have setbacks is that goal-crushers know how to tap into the feeling of having already achieved something great before that great thing actually happens.

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Dairy and Its Effect on Insulin Secretion (and What It Means for Your Waistline)

The relationship between dairy consumption, insulin, and our health can be confusing. It’s easy to see why: The most common types of dairy undeniably spike our insulin levels, and elevated insulin has been linked to dozens of diseases—most diseases, in fact. When insulin is high, your body holds onto body fat. And insulin resistance, which is when your body doesn’t respond to insulin and must release large amounts of the hormone, makes it harder to lose body fat and is the precipitating factor in a host of degenerative diseases.

So, dairy is bad, right? No. The opposite, in fact.

Insulin is an old, old hormone. Evolution has preserved its structure across hundreds of millions of years and hundreds of thousands of species. Fish, insects, reptiles, birds, and mammals all secrete insulin with fairly similar amino acid arrangements (insulin from certain species of fish has even been clinically effective in humans), so, clearly, it is a vital hormone required by life to flourish and prosper.

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A Visual Guide to Peppers

Eating spicy food is a lot like running a marathon. They both hurt while you’re doing them, and the next day can be pretty painful, too. You have to fight the urge to quit. Crying is par for the course. Yet you persevere, all the while knowing that you’re going to sign up for the same suffering again in the future.

The world is cuckoo for chilis. Restaurants compete to have the spiciest wings, hottest chili, and most tear-inducing sushi. Competitors on television shows and YouTube series sear the inside of their mouths for our viewing pleasure. Self-proclaimed pepper-heads are always working to bring hotter and hotter peppers to market. In fact, the most tongue-blistering varieties we have now—ones with ominous names like the Carolina Reaper and Trinidad Scorpion—didn’t evolve naturally. They are the result of systematic crossbreeding designed to create chilis so packed with heat that only the bravest (or most foolhardy, depending on your point of view) would dare try them.

Eating spicy foods satisfies the deeply ingrained human need to test our limits and see how much discomfort we can take. That’s not the only reason we’re drawn to spicy foods, though. The pain they cause seems to stimulate the release of endorphins, part of the body’s endogenous opioid system, which accounts for why spicy foods “hurt so good” instead of just plain hurting. Capsaicin, the chemical in hot peppers that imparts the characteristic burning sensation, is anti-inflammatory and has numerous health benefits.

Can you feel the burn?

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Instant Pot “Sous Vide” Egg Bites Recipe

The low-carb community was pretty pumped when coffee shops first started to serve sous vide egg bites. Until then, most breakfast options came between a couple of slices of a bagel or croissant. Coming in around $5 for two little egg bites, it was only a matter of time before people started looking for make-at-home versions.
Do You Need a Sous Vide to Make Egg Bites?
Let’s first put it out there that food cooked sous vide is delicious. The temperature is so precisely controlled that there’s virtually no risk of overcooking or undercooking, and for the most part, it’s a hands-off cooking method. Still, it’s cost-prohibitive for a lot of kitchens – you’re looking at a couple hundred dollars for a decent system, which is more than the average household wants to spend on an appliance they’ll use only occasionally.

The solution? These adorable little egg bites are not actually made in a sous vide, but instead in an Instant Pot. The end result is a light and fluffy egg bite bursting with flavor. Ideally, these egg bites would be made in a silicone egg mold, but they also turn out well in ½ pint mason jars. If you don’t have an Instant Pot, there is an oven modification below.

This recipe makes 10 egg bites (5 egg bites of each flavor) which are great for an on-the-go breakfast or protein-packed snack. Feel free to experiment with your favorite add-ins.

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week—Edition 148

Research of the Week

Compared to vegetable fat high in artificial trans-fatty acids (and a control diet), ruminant fat high in natural trans-fatty acids improves liver health, gut biome, and inflammatory status of lab rats.

Reasonable, accessible stack for COVID.

Selenium deficiency is implicated in viral myocarditis.

Energy compensation after exercise varies between individuals and may predict adiposity.

Too many omega-6 fats, increased risk of peripheral nerve pain.

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Ask a Health Coach: Is This Good for Me or Not?

Hey folks, we’re back for another round of Ask a Health Coach. This week, Erin is shedding light on the health benefits of dairy, when too much fiber is to blame, and why we should all stop labeling foods as good and bad. Keep your questions coming down in the comments or over in our Mark’s Daily Apple Facebook group.
 
Jen asked:
“Kind of an odd question, but is there any science indicating whether goat’s milk is a better alternative for human consumption than cow’s milk? After a decade of primal eating, I’ve easily given up everything else (grains, sugar, etc.) but the one thing I still struggle with is milk, and I don’t have any sensitivities to it, but I wonder if there’s a better alternative.”
First of all, I definitely don’t consider this an odd question; dairy is one of the things my clients ask about most often.

Dairy soft of fits into a primal gray area. While there are tons of studies of the negative metabolic impact of sugar, industrialized seed oils, and processed foods, dairy is in a slightly different camp. I can see the confusion though. Many folks who follow a paleo diet eliminate it completely. And while a primal diet follows a lot of the same tenets, it’s far less restrictive – even Mark agrees that full-fat and raw cow’s milk can be a great addition to your primal eating plan.

But to answer your question about if goat’s milk is a “better” alternative to cow’s milk, the answer is…it depends on what you mean by better.

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