Self-Efficacy: Reach Your Health Goals Every Time

Who can help you reach your health goals every time? Nope, it’s not me. Although health coaches are a great resource for helping you set goals, overcome obstacles, and get out of your own well-intentioned way. For the record, that person is also not your spouse, your roommate, your friends, or your kids.

The one person who can make you reach all your health goals is YOU.

I see you out there working hard, swapping your typical yogurt and banana breakfast for a protein-rich meal of eggs and bacon. I see you squeezing in a few sprint sessions a week and limiting blue light at night. You’re committed to doing everything right. Until, something goes wrong.

Tell me if any of these statements sound familiar.

“I’ll start over on Monday”

“I guess I’m not cut out for this”

“My husband/wife/kid keeps sabotaging me with sugary treats”

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Epigenetics, or What I Mean by “Reprogram Your Genes”

You can’t change your genes. But you can program them.

The modern world presents a number of problems for our genes. The world we’ve constructed over the last 50 years is not the environment in which our genetic code evolved. Our genes don’t “expect” historically low magnesium levels in soil, spending all day indoors and all night staring into bright blue lights, earning your keep by sitting on your ass, getting your food delivered to your door, communicating with people primarily through strange scratchings that travel through the air. So when these novel environmental stimuli interact with our genetic code, we get disease and dysfunction.

The genes look bad viewed through a modern prism. They get “associated” with certain devastating health conditions. But really, if you were to restore the dietary, behavioral, and ambient environments under which those genes evolved, those genes wouldn’t look so bad anymore. They might even look great.

This is epigenetics: altering the programming language of your genes without altering the genes themselves.

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Measuring Ketones: What, When, Why, and How

Keto is unique compared to other diets because there is an objective marker that tells you if you’re on the right track. With an easy at-home test, you can confirm that you are, in fact, in a state of ketosis.

Regular readers probably know I’m not a big data tracker. My energy, sleep, workout performance, stamina, and enjoyment of life tell me almost everything I need to know about how well I’m doing. Nevertheless, I get that some people love to play the self-quantification game. In some medical situations, measuring ketones is advisable, even necessary, as well. I’m not a total curmudgeon about it. Heck, I’ve been known to check in on my blood glucose and ketones from time to time.

If you’re thinking about testing, you should become familiar with the three different methods. Each has its own pros and cons. You’ll want to pick the option that’s right for you.

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Dear Mark: Gluten Sensitivity, Intolerance, Celiac Disease, and Grains

 

Dear Mark,

You talk a lot about the evils of grains. I follow your logic on why a grain free diet is best, and I have seen weight loss and just feel better overall since heeding your advice. But there is one thing (well, more than one) that I don’t understand but hear about often. Could you explain what gluten intolerance is and why you should avoid gluten?
Excellent question. Even though we’re seeing gluten-free labeling more and more, it’s not always clear why gluten can be problematic. Because of cross-contamination, it’s not always obvious whether a food contains gluten or not. Further, gluten intolerance symptoms can masquerade as other conditions. Let’s break it all down.
What is Gluten?
Gluten is a large, water-soluble protein that creates the elasticity in dough. It’s found in grains such as wheat, rye, barley, triticale, and oats. These days it’s also found in additives like thickeners and fillers used in everything from lunch meat to soup to candy. You can also find gluten in beers and vinegars that have been fermented from gluten-containing grains.

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Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe

Chicago is known for its deep dish pizza. In Southern California, you have tacos on every corner. Philadelphia loves their cheesesteaks. And you know you’re in Nashville when every third restaurant claims they have the best Hot Chicken in town. If you’re looking for the crispy kick of hot chicken but you’re nowhere near Music City, we’ve got you covered. Our Nashville Hot Chicken recipe tastes just like the real thing, without the fried food hangover from oxidized frying oil and grain-based breading. Yes, it can be done. This recipe is fairly involved, but it’ll be worth it in the end. Not sure about the heat factor? You can adapt this recipe from slightly zingy to three-alarm fire. If you want to break a sweat, taste the coating mixture and the hot chicken sauce before you apply, and add more cayenne. If you want to scale back the spice level, simply reduce the cayenne pepper accordingly. If you want your chicken to have just a subtle zip, you can completely omit the cayenne. The chicken will still have a nice kick thanks to the Primal Kitchen® Buffalo Sauce. The best way to make the prep for this dish run smoothly is to set up a station with three coatings. Move the chicken like an assembly line down each coating mix. Some of the almond flour coating will clump up as you start dredging the chicken in it. That’s okay! Press these clumps into the chicken as you bread. It will create great texture for the final product. If you don’t have chicken thighs, you can use chicken breast. Follow the same directions, and bake at 400 degrees instead. You can also lightly spray the chicken with a spritz of Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Spray prior to baking to prevent the chicken from drying out. We used coconut sugar in the sauce since it melts with heat and helps the sauce come together. If you’d prefer to use a sugar substitute, your best bet may be a liquid sweetener, like a monk fruit extract based sweetener, but we have not tested this substitution. Here’s how to make it. Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe Ingredients 1 lb. boneless chicken thighs 1 cup almond flour 7 Tbsp tapioca starch ? cup coconut milk (or other full-fat milk) ¼ cup Primal Kitchen Buffalo Sauce 1 Tbsp coconut flour 1 tsp lemon juice ½ tsp paprika ½ tsp onion powder ½ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp salt ½ tsp black pepper ?-1/4 tsp cayenne pepper Butter lettuce or iceberg lettuce Pickles Sauce 1.5 Tbsp Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil 3 Tbsp Primal Kitchen Buffalo Sauce 3 Tbsp water 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp sweetener ¼ tsp cayenne pepper ¼ tsp chili powder ¼ tsp garlic powder ¼ tsp salt Directions Pound the chicken between two pieces of parchment paper until they are of even thickness. Set up three containers or shallow dishes. In the first, mix together two tablespoons of tapioca starch and one … Continue reading “Gluten Free Nashville Style Hot Chicken Recipe”

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Weekly Link Love—Edition 87

Research of the Week
Yoga promotes stress resilience.

Adipose tissue is limited by the number of embryonic progenitor cells.

Relying only on antibody testing may not capture everyone with coronavirus immunity.

Birds who swallow fish eggs whole may deposit them intact and viable into isolated lakes.

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