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Smoked Prime Rib Recipe, Without a Smoker

Making prime rib at home can be intimidating, but we’re going to show you a simple grill-to-oven method that is virtually foolproof. This may become your new go-to recipe when you want to impress! This prime rib starts on a gas or charcoal grill with wood chips to infuse it with a smoky flavor. If you have a smoker, by all means use that for the smoking portion. It is then finished in the oven to get a crispy browned exterior and a juicy, medium-rare interior. A variety of wood chip varieties can be used for beef, but for this recipe we like cherry, apple or pecan. For a bolder flavor, you can try hickory or oak. We highly recommend salting the prime rib the night before and letting it rest in the fridge in a pan with a rack. This will give the meat more flavor and be more tender after cooking. We serve the prime rib along with our Primal Kitchen Steak Sauce. Ingredients 5 lbs. boneless prime rib Salt 1/4 cup unsalted butter 2 Tbsp. fresh thyme leaves 3 Tbsp. chopped sage leaves 2 tsp. Black pepper 8 cloves grated garlic Primal Kitchen® Steak Sauce Directions Pat the prime rib dry. Liberally salt your meat on all sides and place it on a rack in the fridge overnight. The next day, take the meat out and allow it to rest at room temperature for an hour. Melt the butter and mix in the thyme, sage, pepper and garlic. Rub the mixture all over the meat and place it in a cast iron pan. We used a cast iron grill pan since it was too big for our regular cast iron pan.   While the meat is resting, soak some wood chips for about 20 minutes. Beef can withstand many types of wood for smoking. Many people like using hickory or oak, but for this we like fruit tree chips like apple, cherry, or pecan. For less than $20, you can purchase a smoker box, which is a metal box with holes that holds wood chips in your grill. Or you can do what I did and make your own smoker out of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Either way, drain your wood chips thoroughly. Place them in the smoker box or in the center of a large square of foil. Wrap the wood chips in the foil, then use a knife to poke some holes in the top of the foil packet. This will allow fragrant smoke to emanate from the package. Turn one side of your gas grill on to high heat. Place the foil packet with wood chips on the side that’s heating up. Cover the grill and allow it to come up to temperature and for the wood chips to start smoking. This will take 30 minutes or so. Once you see a good amount of smoke coming from the foil packet, place the pan with the meat on the opposite side of the grill (the … Continue reading “Smoked Prime Rib Recipe, Without a Smoker”

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New and Noteworthy: What I Read This Week — Edition 134

Research of the Week
OLED is a little better than LED for circadian rhythms, but not by much.

Obesity drove the pandemic.

Some gut bacteria metabolize cholesterol.

Plant “milk” leads to iodine deficiency. Cow milk leads to sufficiency.

Men are more likely to make extreme decisions and changes than women.

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Ask a Health Coach: Pre-Diabetes, Detoxes, and What’s More Important, Diet or Exercise?

Hey folks! Erin back to answer more of your questions. If you’re struggling to keep your blood sugar balanced, just coming off a 30-day challenge, or want to know the real solution for long-term weight loss, stick around for this week’s post. We love getting your questions, so keep them coming in the comments below or over in our Mark’s Daily Apple Facebook group.

 
Devin asked:
“I just got blood work done and it came back that I’m prediabetic. I don’t eat much sugar (I’m not a dessert kind of person) and follow a paleo diet about 70-80% of the time, so I’m confused. What else could be at play here?”
Sugar is sneaky. It’s everywhere in our culinary culture and not just in the places you’d expect, like cookies, cakes, and $6 coffee drinks. The average person consumes up to 66 pounds of added sugar per year. That’s added sugar, not naturally sweet foods like fruit, or foods that convert to sugar, which I’ll talk more about here in a sec.

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Revisiting Sunscreen

For the last 30 years, the messaging has been clear: Slather your body with sunscreen if you so much as even think about going outside in the sun. Cloudy and rainy? Doesn’t matter. Wear the sunscreen. Want to build up a base tan? You’re killing yourself. Wear the sunscreen. It’s only ten minutes? That ten minutes of sunscreen-less sun exposure will shave a year off your life. Wear the sunscreen.

In more recent years, the tide has shifted. Research has come out showing that most commercial sunscreen contains chemical compounds that act as carcinogens when absorbed, at least in animal models. Maybe we don’t even want to block the sun at all. Or maybe we do, but there’s a better way to do it than using chemical filters that absorb into our skin. At any rate, I figured with summer rolling around that it was time to revisit the topic of sunscreen. So let’s do that, shall we?

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Primal Practices that Activate the Vagus Nerve and Improve Vagal Tone

In part one of this series on improving vagal tone, I explained that the vagus nerve is the information superhighway of your autonomic nervous system. It connects your brain to organs and glands throughout the body and acts as the main conduit of your parasympathetic (“rest-and-digest”) nervous system. Vagal nerve activity touches just about every system in the body, including respiration, immunity, cardiovascular activity, digestion, and the gut microbiome.

The term “vagal tone” refers to how active your parasympathetic nervous system is. Ideally, we want high vagal tone, because that indicates a generally relaxed state where the body can focus on growth and repair. When vagal tone is low, the sympathetic (“fight-flight-freeze”) nervous system is dominant. That’s no good. The sympathetic nervous system should kick in when we need to respond to an acute threat or stressor, but we don’t want it running in the background all the time.

Unfortunately, a chronically stressed, sympathetic-dominant state is the norm for most people nowadays. Scientists are always on the hunt for ways to alleviate that stress and reduce the medical burden associated with it. Some researchers are investigating pharmaceutical means of improving vagal tone, along with protocols for using electrostimulation. You don’t need these high-tech procedures, though. Once you start digging into the science of the vagus nerve, you realize something cool: Most of the things we promote in the Primal community probably improve vagal tone.

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Sprinting, Jumping, Losing Body Fat, And Cultivating Gratitude)

Before we get into details about the two best exercises ever known to mankind to shed excess body fat (sprinting and jumping), I want to put in a little plug for the trending healthy living topic of gratitude. The concept is easy to pay lip service to, especially when you’re struggling and not in the best mood to feel it naturally. I’m recently recovered from a minor knee injury lasting six months that prevented me from doing my beloved sprinting and high jumping workouts. While athletics no longer dominates my life as it did when I was a pro triathlete, there was a lingering frustration deep down from being deprived of my favorite fitness endeavors, being unsure of the diagnosis of my injury, testing out the knee and experiencing setbacks, and being forced to be massively patient.

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