Easy Roasted Winter Vegetables

It’s a question we might ask (or be asked) every day: What’s for dinner? To keep it simple, Primal, and Primal-keto, that answer can easily be meat and vegetables every night. Day after day. There’s nothing wrong with that, folks. It gets the job done well, and the formula can be easily changed to accommodate preferences and banish boredom. Roast chicken instead of searing steak; broil salmon instead of baking pork chops; steam broccoli instead of boiling asparagus; stir-fry mixed veggies instead of serving a raw salad. You get the idea.

Roasting vegetables is an indispensable cooking technique and meal prep time-saver. Roasting veggies adds caramelized flavor that will make it a pleasure to eat any oven-kissed leftover vegetables again the next day. Make sure to pair vegetables with similar cook times together and cut the pieces in as uniform pieces as you can to ensure even cooking.

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Weekly Link Love – Edition 69

Research of the Week
Walking isn’t enough to prevent weight gain.

Whey protein isolate beats even the most “optimized” blend of plant proteins.

The standard Western diet damages memory.

An estimation of “post-treatment Lyme disease” numbers in America (bigger than you think!).

Creatine, amino acids, and whey work better than whey alone.

Good for tacos, bad for sleep.

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No-Dairy Dirty Chai Latte

A little sweet, a lot spiced, and topped with cloud-like frothed (or warmed) milk, a chai latte is black tea steeped with milk as well as cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, and often black pepper, fennel, and ginger. Traditionally sweetened with a bit of honey, the chai lattes available widely in the Western world tend to be cloying with syrups and artificial flavors that don’t honor the Indian art of steeping the tea with whole spices. To find a Primal and Primal-keto version, forego the coffee house line and make your own at home.

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7 Tips and Considerations for Eating One Meal a Day

As the practice of eating one meal a day has grown in popularity, the questions have poured in. Foremost among them is some variation of the most basic: Is eating one meal a day a good idea? Is it safe? Is it smart? Should you do it? And on, and on. I’m not here to tell you whether you should or shouldn’t eat one meal a day. That’s a decision for you to make. What I can do is, if it’s something you’re leaning toward, give you some things to consider before trying and some tips for optimizing it. After all, one meal a day is relatively novel. Six to eight small meals a day is highly novel in the human experience, don’t get me wrong, and I would never advise something like that. But, breakfast, lunch, and dinner are relatively well-preserved across the spectrum of human traditions. Most populations eat at least twice a day. Although individual exceptions exist, few if any populations eat one meal a day in perpetuity. So, what are some things to consider? Don’t expect it be optimal for mass gain. When you’re trying to gain muscle mass, you need to eat. You need to eat more food than you’re used to eating. Calories in need to exceed calories out. Funnily enough, it’s during a phase of desired mass gain that calorie counting really begins to matter. Focusing on the quality of the food you eat is great for inadvertent calorie reduction and weight loss; emphasizing the quantity while maintaining the quality is usually required for desired weight gain. It’s really hard to eat enough food in one meal to gain weight. Lose fat while maintaining muscle, perhaps even making neuromuscular or efficiency-based strength gains? Sure. But very few get huge eating OMAD. If that’s your goal, OMAD every day might not be the best option. Focus on protein. Protein is the most essential nutrient, biologically-speaking. We can’t make it ourselves. We can only eat it or pull it from existing tissues. For the sake of your health, your physical function, and your aesthetics, you should do the former and avoid the latter. Protein is also incredibly filling. Your protein intake might not make the cut eating one meal a day. You might eat too little. Plus, recent evidence suggests that to maximize muscle gain, spreading your protein intake across four meals a day with around 0.4 g protein per kg of bodyweight per meal is the best or “optimal” method. That’s mostly based on studies in “normal” people, not “weirdos” eating grass-fed meat or going keto or (gasp) eating a single meal a day. I suspect there’s some level of adaptation in us “weirdos” that improves our ability to utilize all the protein. On paper, there’s a lot riding against you getting enough protein. In reality, you will absorb all the protein you eat, even if it’s a ton in a single sitting. The real trick is making sure you eat enough—that can be hard. Don’t … Continue reading “7 Tips and Considerations for Eating One Meal a Day”

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15-Minute Meal Prep: Keto Ground Beef Recipes

If you want fast, easy, nutritious, and varied ways of cooking with ground beef, our three keto ground beef recipes will show you how. This keto-Primal meal plan and prep featuring ground beef will teach you how to cook lunches, dinners, and leftovers in 15 minutes. Disclaimer: If you’re not a fast vegetable chopper and dicing onions makes you feel like a teary slowpoke, you might not pull the entire meal prep off in 15 minutes, but that’s OK! Take your time to get everything washed, prepared, and chopped before you start cooking so that once the ground beef starts sizzling in the skillet, you’re 15 minutes away from an Asian Ground Beef Bowl, Cheeseburger Salad, and Spicy Ground Beef Tacos.

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Success Story: Always Striving

If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

Folks, I have been grateful for every story that has come my way over the years. It’s an incredible privilege being on the receiving end of your reflections and evolutions, and they are why I’ve kept at it all these years—knowing the message and information have made a difference in people’s lives. I appreciate every single one. Amy’s story is so real; it’s not a story that celebrates attaining a body composition goal, but should be celebrated for how far Amy has come on her Primal journey. Thank you to reader Amy for sharing her story with us. 

I have been following Mark’s Daily Apple since you started the blog. Your message really resonated with me from the beginning and I loved reading all of the success stories. I looked forward to writing a success story of my own one day, but it didn’t seem like it was ever going to happen—so I’m beyond thrilled to finally be writing one now!

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