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Grilled Lamb Skewers with Yogurt Mint Dipping Sauce

When most people think about firing up the grill or stoking a campfire to cook an outdoor meal, lamb isn’t the first meat that comes to mind. Isn’t lamb the type of meat that should be served on a fancy platter with mint jelly on the side, not seared over a campfire and eaten with your hands?

Personally, we’ve never liked mint jelly or those silly, frilly white paper caps that chefs stick on lamb legs. We like our lamb seared over an open flame in tender bite-sized morsels that have been richly seasoned and tenderized in a marinade. We slide the meat right off the skewer and pop it in our mouth – it may not be fancy, but it sure is good.

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Kimchi Pancakes

Kimchi is great as a side dish, but it’s also really delicious as a main ingredient. Take kimchi soup, for example. Or, these savory egg pancakes laced with kimchi, scallions and garlic, and served with sesame dipping sauce.

It’s important to supplement your diet with fermented foods and these savory pancakes are a tasty way to do it. Kimchi is just one of many fermented foods that can help build up an army of gut flora for you. These pancakes also use potato starch as an ingredient, a resistant starch that can feed gut bacteria. However, the starch is heated, which can negate its RS function. So in this case, the potato starch is mainly there to give the pancakes a crispy and chewy texture without using regular all-purpose flour.

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Quick & Easy Salmon Cakes

This is a guest post from Diane Sanfilippo, author of Practical Paleo and the wildly popular blog, BalancedBites.com.

Diane often leaves a lot of space to make her recipes your own, and this one is no exception. This recipe can easily be modified to switch up flavors, or for those following a low FODMAP diet.

If you’re looking to dress-up the wild canned salmon you’ve been buying, this is the recipe for you! It’s quick and easy, and it can be made mostly from the ingredients you tend to have on-hand.

Bonus recipe: Use Primal Kitchen™ Mayo to make an amazing dipping sauce/topping for these salmon cakes using the recipe at the bottom of the page.

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Better Than Fried Chicken with Coconut Aminos Dipping Sauce

There are a lot of recipes out there for paleo/Primal fried chicken, all of them trying to create a crispy, finger-licking good coating using various nut and coconut products. This recipe isn’t for fried chicken, per se, but after tasting it you might give up trying to coat a piece of chicken in anything other than it’s own skin again.

This is likely to be the crispiest baked chicken you’ve ever had, with skin that shatters when you bite into it. And, there’s no messy frying involved. The secret? Dredging the chicken in a mixture of egg whites, baking soda and salt, then letting the chicken air-dry overnight in the refrigerator. This genius method was perfected in Ideas in Food’s recipe for Korean-style chicken wings. The recipe here takes it one step further by not just using wings – drumsticks and thighs are just as delicious using this baking method.

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Baked Goat Cheese Marinara Dip

Dips make for popular party food, and for good reason. They’re serve yourself friendly, and they pair with everything from breads to cut vegetables. This marinara dip is a zesty break from many of the traditional dip varieties, but the baked goat cheese is creamy and flavorful enough that it’s much more than “just” a dipping sauce. Three ingredients and thirty minutes from start to delicious finish.

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Mini Keto and Primal Crab Cakes

Crab cakes may remind you of cocktail parties, weddings, or sun-soaked getaways to the seashore where you seek refuge from the sun at a fish shack that serves only the freshest local seafood. Most traditional crab cake recipes include breadcrumbs or flour (or both) and are deep fried in vegetable oil so the end result is a greasy, bready puck that disrespects the naturally sweet, succulent essence of lump crabmeat. We remade the classic crab cake to make it Primal and keto-friendly. Don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients; we like the way the vegetables and seasonings accentuate the crab, but if you prefer a pared-down version, the crab, almond flour, herbs, mayo, egg, lemon juice, salt and pepper would make a perfectly lovely crab cake, too.

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How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke

Artichokes are a mysterious vegetable, and a lot of people are intimidated by them. How do you cook an artichoke? How do you cut into it? What parts do you eat? And how does it taste? You may have had marinated artichoke hearts that come in a jar, or you’ve noticed little strips of artichoke in your spinach dip. But eating a whole artichoke is a lot different than having prepared hearts. In this article, I’m going to show you how to prepare and eat an artichoke, along with my favorite dipping sauces. Are Artichokes Good For You? Coming in at 6g of net carbs per whole artichoke, it’s something you’ll want to add to the rotation if you’re keto. Artichokes are also an antioxidant powerhouse, and they have lots of gut-happy resistant starch. How to Buy Artichokes If you’ve never bought whole artichokes before, you might wonder how to choose good ones. Here’s what to look for: Tight leaves. Your artichoke should look like a giant flower bud. Leaves should not be curling out like a blooming flower. Heft. Pick up a few, and feel their weight. Heavier artichokes are fresher, and lighter ones are older and perhaps dried out. Brown streaks on the outside, or not. A little browning on the outside is nothing to be concerned about. Some people say that the ones with brown streaks are sweeter because the frost that caused them brings out the natural sugars. Once your artichokes are cleaned and steamed properly, the leaves and heart are excellent vehicles for dips. How to Cook an Artichoke (Steam Method) Serves: 2-4 Time in the kitchen: 45 minutes, including 35 minutes steaming time Ingredients 2 artichokes Primal Kitchen® Mayo with Avocado Oil, or Rosemary and Garlic Vegan Mayo if you cannot tolerate eggs 1 lemon Fresh cracked black pepper Directions To prepare an artichoke, first cut off most of the stem on top, leaving about ¼” of the stem left intact. Cut off the tough bottom of the artichoke, about 1” worth. Use kitchen scissors to trim the tough prickly ends of the artichoke leaves. Cut a lemon in half and rub the cut side all of the cut end of the artichoke. Set up a steamer by filling a pot with some water and a squeeze of lemon. Once the water is boiling, set the heat so the water is at a steady simmer. Set up the steamer basket inside and place the artichokes in the basket cut side down. Place the lid on and allow the artichokes to steam for around 30 minutes, 35 minutes if they’re quite large. You know they’re finished when you can put a knife through the center of the stem with little resistance. Allow the artichokes to cool. Combine your favorite Primal Kitchen Mayo with a squeeze of lemon and fresh cracked pepper. How to Eat an Artichoke This part is easy. Once your artichoke is cooled, peel the leaves off of one by one, dip in … Continue reading “How to Cook and Eat an Artichoke”

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Meat and Vegetable Skewers in Basil Marinade

When the whole family helps prepare a meal, cooking dinner feels less like a job and more like a party. Skewers are especially fun to cook because they allow kids to create and personalize their own meal rather than be handed food that someone else chose for them.

The more meat, seafood and vegetable options you provide, the better. It gives both kids (and adults) a chance to be creative and adventurous. Don’t exclude proteins or veggies that you think your family won’t eat – you might be surprised by the colorful and healthy skewers they put together.

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Cashew Turmeric Chicken Salad (Plus a Contest)

Cashew cream is a vegan obsession that can certainly have a place in a Primal kitchen. To make cashew cream, simply blend cashew nuts with water. A little bit of water makes thick, spreadable cream—and a lot of water turns cashew cream into cashew milk. Either way, the texture is smooth and creamy while the flavor is mild and slightly sweet.

The natural sweetness makes cashew cream an instant dessert. Try a spoonful right out of the blender—it’s like nutty whipped cream. It’s good. A little too good. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

Surprisingly, though, all it takes is a little salt, acidity, and spices to take cashew cream in a completely different direction. With those slight modifications, you’ll have yourself a savory dressing. Cashew cream is an obvious replacement for dairy, or, in this recipe, a stand-in for mayonnaise. Believe it or not, this mayonnaise-free chicken salad can easily compete against traditional chicken salad with mayo. The creamy, slightly tangy dressing coats the chicken nicely, and some celery and shallot add a little crunch.

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Top 10 Ingredients that Will Make Your Meals Pop

Want to add more pizzazz to your meal but don’t want to compromise on nutrition? Not a problem, when you select any of the following ingredients to spice up your next meal.

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