Month: September 2019

I Was Determined To Learn What True Human Health Meant

It’s Monday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Monday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

Yup, success stories are back! And I’m looking for more. Follow-ups, mid-progress reflections—every story at every stage has the potential to inspire folks out there who are getting started or contemplating a new beginning. Contact me here to share your story. You never know who you’ll impact by doing it. Enjoy, everyone!

I was born, raised, and continue to live in the rural interior of Catalina Island. My roots run deep here as a fourth generation islander. While the island is just 22 miles off the coast of the concrete jungle known as L.A or what I call “The Mainland,” this place feels as if it were a world away. It’s the land time couldn’t command.

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White Chicken Chili

White chili is called white chili for three reasons. One, it’s made with chicken, not beef. Two, it’s made with white beans. Three, it’s sometimes thickened with milk and flour, or cream.

Does white chili have a place at the Primal table? Absolutely. It’s easy to dispense with the milk and flour, since thickening the chili isn’t crucial to its flavor. What about the beans?  You can keep them in the chili if you like (although perhaps in smaller amounts than most recipes call for). Or, substitute cubes of white sweet potato to provide a creamy but slightly firm texture that’s similar to beans. Like beans, celery root also has a neutral, but earthy flavor.

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Weekly Link Love — Episode 45

Research of the Week
Measles may wipe out the immune system’s memory of other pathogens.

Taking growth hormone, metformin, and DHEA appears to reverse signs of aging in humans.

Increased green cover lowers temperatures in dry climates, but not in wet ones.

Injecting alcohol into tumors kills them.

The health effects of extreme inbreeding.

A low-carb diet improves metabolic health and performance of firefighters.

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Introducing Primal Kitchen® Pasta Sauces—and a Giveaway!

Good morning, everybody. A Weekly Link Love it coming right up, but first I’ve got something to share….

I’ve always been in support of the greatest health with the least amount of pain, suffering and sacrifice. Living well—and eating well—should be as simple as possible. That was the reason behind the first Primal Kitchen® products I created: I wanted to make good Primal eating easier for everyday people with busy lives. It’s the same mission that moves me today in developing healthy sauces, condiments, dressings, bars and more. And today I’m thrilled to share the latest additions I’ve made to the Primal Kitchen collection—the Pasta Sauces. And, of course, I’m celebrating the occasion with a giveaway….

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Menopause, Part II: Psychological Well-being

In our previous menopause post, I mused on some perspectives of menopause that are positive and affirming for women. However, I don’t want to downplay the fact that many women experience menopause as a difficult, frustrating, and even disempowering time. (Again, I am using “menopause” to include the perimenopausal period.) As I mentioned in the last post, some researchers estimate as many as 75% of women experience some type of “menopausal distress,” and we don’t talk about it enough. Today I want to examine some of the psychological and emotional facets of menopause. In the final post of this series, we’ll look at self-care techniques and non-hormonal therapies that seem to be the most beneficial.  What Research Suggests About Emotional Well-being During Menopause Obviously menopause is a major life transition—significant biological changes wrapped up in a complex web of personal and sociocultural beliefs, fears, stressors, and stories. It can be a time of great apprehension, confusion, even despair for some women. Others pass right through menopause with hardly a bat of an eye. Still others welcome and embrace it.  It’s extremely understandable why this would be a challenging time for women. Menopause can be a perfect storm of physical discomfort and cognitive symptoms (brain fog, forgetfulness), sleep deprivation (thanks to those night sweats and hot flashes), and emotional fluctuations. Besides how they feel, these symptoms can affect women’s personal relationships, ability to perform their jobs, and sense of self-worth and self-confidence.  For many women, menopause also coincides with the dual stressors of aging parents and raising teenagers or having a newly empty nest. Plus, menopause is an unmistakable marker of aging, which can evoke complicated feelings as well.  Overall, stress, depression, and anxiety seem to be fairly common during menopause. Recent Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Perimenopausal Depression commissioned by the Board of Trustees for The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) and the Women and Mood Disorders Task Force of the National Network of Depression Centers describe perimenopause as a “window of vulnerability for the development of both depressive symptoms and a diagnosis of major depressive disorder.” It’s difficult to know exactly how many women are affected. Studies of depression and anxiety are usually conducted on women whose symptoms are severe enough to seek help from their doctors. Researchers estimate that up to 40% of women will experience depression at some point during menopause; it’s unclear how prevalent anxiety might be.  It’s easy to assume that some women become depressed and anxious during menopause because their symptoms are so gnarly. To some degree, that narrative is probably true. Studies do find that women who experience more severe symptoms such as frequent hot flashes also exhibit more depression and anxiety. This makes sense—being physically uncomfortable and unable to get a good night’s sleep can certainly set the stage for poor psychological outcomes.  On the other hand, it’s likely that for some women, depression and anxiety exacerbate the physical and emotional symptoms. That is, depression and anxiety might be a … Continue reading “Menopause, Part II: Psychological Well-being”

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Life In the Sanitized Bubble (Or Why Probiotics Are So Important)

For the vast majority of human history (and prehistory), men, women, and children had near-constant contact with the natural world around them. They were walking on the ground. They were playing in the dirt. They were digging for roots and grubs. They were eating with their hands. They were field dressing animals and wiping their hands on the grass. Nothing was sterilized; the tools to sterilize the environment didn’t exist. You could boil water, but that was about it. Bacteria were everywhere, and humans were constantly ingesting it. Even as babies, preindustrial infants nursed for almost four years, so they were getting a steady source of breastmilk-based probiotic bacteria for a good portion of their early lives.

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