Month: August 2019

Weekly Link Love — Episode 44

Research of the Week
Statins increase Lp(a).

In mice, a high-fat maternal diet protects against Alzheimer’s in the offspring.

Neanderthals ranged into western Iran.

Among Chinese seniors living in an elderly community, higher LDL predicts lower rates of dementia.

Heated canola oil worsens gut inflammation.

Dairy still has no relation to mortality.

Read More

22 Keto Air Fryer Recipes

A special thanks to Aimee McNew at Paleohacks.com for today’s keto recipe roundup.

Cook up keto-friendly meat, veggies, chips, and fries in a snap with the air fryer!

The air fryer works similar to a convection oven, and it’s becoming every bit as ubiquitous as the crock pot. It’s a must-have kitchen appliance for when you want to save time while making healthier meals—which you’ll definitely want when you’re on the keto diet.

One of the best parts of using an air fryer is the ability to make deliciously crispy recipes like onion rings or fish sticks—but without any grease.

If you’re new to keto or the air fryer (or both), these 22 recipes for appetizers, sides, healthy snacks, and mains are a great way to get started! Serve it alongside a slice of keto bread, and you’ve got yourself a great fat-burning meal!

Read More

What’s TMAO, and What Does It Have to Do With My Health?

With the last few weeks’ definitive guide and follow-up on fish, a reader asked me about trimethylamine N-oxide, or TMAO. What is it?

TMAO is the latest justification given for why eating meat just has to be bad for you. Saturated fat didn’t take. Animal protein didn’t work. Iron was a dud. IGF-1 hasn’t panned out. Methionine isn’t enough. So now they’re using TMAO to convince you not to eat that steak.

How’s it supposed to work?

Read More

Dear Mark: Is Fish Enough, Do Carnivores Really Need It, and More

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering several questions you guys asked in response to the fish post from last week. First, is being a pescatarian enough? Can you get what you need from seafood without eating meat, dairy, or eggs? Next, how important is fish for a carnivore? Third, how’s that Whole Foods farmed salmon? Healthy or not? Then I write a bit about canned cod liver, the underrated seafood, followed by a short blurb about whether we should worry about wild salmon sustainability as well as a question about taking chlorella to reduce heavy metal absorption from fish.

Let’s go:

Read More

Retired, Reborn and Pursuing My Passion

It’s Monday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Monday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

Yup, success stories are back! And I’m looking for more. Follow-ups, mid-progress reflections—every story at every stage has the potential to inspire folks out there who are getting started or contemplating a new beginning. Contact me here. Enjoy, everybody!

This week’s return to success stories features a contemporary of mine. (Yup, those of us in our 60s want to show what’s possible.) I hope you enjoy this follow-up story from reader Bob Connor. You’ll find his original success story reprinted below along with an inspiring update on where he is (and what he’s up to) now. 

Read More

Vegetable Latkes

Call them what you want – latkes, vegetables pancakes, fried-deliciousness. They’re traditionally made with potatoes, a food some of us Primals feel better avoiding. The tuber’s low-moisture and high-starch content creates a crispy exterior and fluffy interior when fried in oil. The high starch content, unfortunately, is also the reason the insulin resistant among us are better off turning to less starchy vegetables to satisfy latke cravings.

Although latkes made with vegetables like carrot, turnip, daikon radish and zucchini will never be quite as crispy as potato latkes, they’re darn good in their own right. The flavor of each vegetable is mild enough that you’ll still feel like you’re eating a latke, yet the latke is transformed into something new and interesting. Zucchini latkes are mildest of all, the carrot and turnip are slightly sweet, and the daikon version has just a hint of spiciness.

Read More

Latest Posts