Month: March 2018

Beef & Broccoli with Sesame-Peanut Sauce

This meal comes together in three easy parts. One, toss the broccoli in the oven and roast it. Two, whisk together an amazing sesame-peanut sauce. Three, quickly stir-fry sliced steak and then toss everything together in a bowl. Yum.

The sweet and salty sesame-peanut sauce is what makes this a favorite beef and broccoli recipe. The sauce is addictively good—and versatile. Drizzle it over beef, chicken and salmon, or over grilled and roasted vegetables, sautéed greens, and rice or cauliflower rice. The peanut sauce can be thinned out with coconut milk to create a creamy salad dressing, and if you like spicy, go ahead and add a pinch of red pepper flakes.

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The Benchmark For Me Is “What Works?”

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. I’ll continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading!

Write a success story. Success? Really? Me? This is no rags to riches story, no 50lb weight losses or disease turn around. In fact, by Western world standards I was probably considered pretty “healthy” (or at least ‘normal’) and probably well above average in terms of general fitness and energy.

So let’s define what “then” was: I was over 40, could get close to a 3hr marathon, worked out… ate (by SAD standards) ‘sensibly’, drank a bit too much (alcohol) but (thought I) was doing pretty well. Right? However, in my early forties I also had a 36 inch waist, I was hypertensive and taking medication (along with various off the shelf supplements), I had an enlarged prostate (measured at 38g). I could be up over 80kg if I wasn’t running 100km a week… and as for those chronic exercise issues, well even now I still try and justify them! (Looking back it is amazing I didn’t see more of these signs as ‘abnormal’.)

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Primal Starter: Fielding Others’ Opinions

It’s a role that’s probably more often thrust upon us—that of Primal advocate. There we are minding our own healthy business, and somebody’s question or comment fixes the spotlight on us. Why do we eat “so much” fat? What could possibly be wrong with bread? Why do we wear the shoes we do or race down the street like we stole something?

Sometimes it’s the people in our inner circle who are the inquiring minds. Other times it’s co-workers or even random strangers. Perhaps it’s even our doctors. Whatever the case, what might begin as a simple question can often devolve into a full-blown harangue about how we’re putting our health in grave peril. On the flip side, it may be we who descend into an extended diatribe on all things Primal as the other person tries to slink away, having just been intrigued by our lettuce wrapped “un-wich.” How do we respond in these conversations without losing all patience or perspective?

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Alternative Therapies For ADHD: Part 2

With 6.1 million children in this country bearing a past or present ADHD diagnosis, it’s little wonder folks had a lot to say in the initial post I did on the subject a few months back.  For the most part, people were pumped to discover new potential therapies for themselves or loved ones, or at the very least to find validation in their own hunt for side effect free ADHD treatment. Others questioned the validity of certain alternative approaches, and still more posed questions about other treatments they’d heard about or were interested in.
Is there any substance to the other alternative therapies I added in passing within that previous post? What else shows promise? Let’s dig in….

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Primal Starter: Living Purposefully

Living life on your own terms isn’t just a quaint turn of phrase. It has huge effects on your health. A large body of research shows that the less control you think you have over your life, the higher your mortality risk. That persists even when you control for other health variables and biomarkers. It’s even true for animals. Self-agency—or even the illusion of it—appears to be a requirement for healthy, happy aging.

And unlike some of the characteristics shared by centenarians, like good genes, control is malleable. You can’t change the structure of your DNA. You can, however, wrest control over your own life. Despite whatever challenges present themselves, you get to decide what purpose you contribute to each day.

How?

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