Month: February 2017

Long Fasts: Worth the Risk?

Intermittent fasting, schmittermittent schmasting. The hot new trend is the extended fast—eating nothing and drinking only non-caloric beverages for no less than three days and often as many as 30-40 days. A mere compressed eating window this isn’t.

If fasting for more than three days sounds riskier than just skipping breakfast, you’re right. Long fasts can get you into trouble. They’re a big commitment. You shouldn’t just stumble into one because it sounds interesting or some guy on your Twitter feed wrote about it.

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Some Primal Answers for Kids’ Problem Behaviors

Last week, Chris Kresser wrote a great article discussing the emerging—and likely causative—link between poor gut health and childhood misbehavior. He explained potential mechanisms for the association, as well as solutions to counter it.

But as any parent knows, getting a picky child to adopt your arsenal of perfect gut-supporting foods and supplements isn’t always easy. Not every kid immersed in the righteous anger of the terrible twos will stop what he’s doing to drink sauerkraut juice, nibble on kimchi, take resistant starch, drink kefir and bone broth.. It’s certainly a major part of the problem and the solution, but are there any other dietary causes? What else can a parent try to stem the flood of tantrums?

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Dear Mark: Alternative Therapies Follow-up

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering four questions from last week’s “Alternative Therapies” comment board. I asked you for questions and comments about other potential therapies, and you all put in good work. First, I address that oldest of home remedies: chicken soup. Does it actually cure? Next, I discuss supplementing with humic and fulvic acid. Can the byproducts of rotting plants and mud improve your health? After that, I quickly address a question about the psychiatric merits of psychedelic therapy. I end with a discussion of the merits (or lack thereof) of pet-assisted therapy.

Let’s go:

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Weekend Link Love – Edition 440

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK
Turns out that humans display a ton of biological and psychological diversity.

Dogs know when you’re being selfish, and they don’t like it.

Baltic hunter-gatherers developed agriculture without outside influence.

Using alcohol to sleep isn’t such a good idea.

Salmonella may have killed the Aztec empire.

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Turkish Salad

In this refreshing salad, herbs are treated as a main ingredient, not a garnish. Fill your salad bowl with parsley, mint and dill (thyme and oregano are also good), either finely chopped or roughly snipped with scissors. The bright and fragrant herbs obviously add color and potent aroma, but there’s more hidden in their leaves… namely antioxidants, plus many other health benefits.

Don’t get bogged down by memorizing which herbs offer what benefits. Just make a point of regularly enjoying salads like this one that feed your body a variety of fresh herbs. Every recipe for Turkish shepherd’s salad has a slightly different combination of ingredients, but they all strive for refreshing, lively flavor. This Turkish salad combines loads of fresh herbs, tomatoes, bell pepper, cucumber, and red onion with creamy feta and a tangy dressing made from olive oil and pomegranate molasses.

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When You Reprogram Your Genes to Become a Fat-burning Beast, Life Can Be Good!

It’s Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Mark’s Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Mark’s Daily Apple community please contact me here. In fact, I have a contest going right now. So if you have a story to share, no matter how big or how small, you’ll be in the running to win a big prize. Read more here.

It goes like this. I married at 23-years-old (180 pounds), and my wife Joanna and I had 3 kids by the time I was 28-years-old (190 pounds). During the kids’ younger years, we did what everyone else did. Run around with the kids, taking them to this sport and that club meeting. All the while not really paying any attention to ourselves. Fast food for dinner, hamburger, hot dogs, French fries, pizza and soda at the games as we watched. Working hard at our work and bearing the stress of moving up in a growing company, again not paying attention to myself. Long hours, a lot of times sedentary at a desk behind the keyboard. All the hard work payed off in my position at the company, but where did it take me?

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