Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Month: September 2013

The Impact of Loneliness

We’ve likely all felt it at some point in our lives – those depressing days (or more) when we walk through the world feeling like we’re traveling on a separate plane of existence from the rest of the happily coupled and connected human race. For some of us, however, these blips in social well-being take on a chronic trajectory, an ongoing emotional journey of their own. Loneliness can seem like a self-exacerbating condition. We’re isolated, and we’re unsure how to break through it. Some of us enjoy lifelong proximity to extended family, intact partnerships and childhood friendships that take us from grade school to grave. For many of us, however, we socialize more on Facebook than at our kitchen tables. We might have a strong core (“nuclear”) family but no friends in our current locales that we could call on at 2:00 in the morning.

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This Gluten-Free Thing Is a Really Overblown Fad!

This is a comment I’m starting to see more and more often. Go to any news article about gluten and the comment section will be littered with angry outbursts and outright vitriol for people who go gluten-free. Skeptical blogs love to trot out posts lambasting and ridiculing the “gluten-free fad.” And from what I can tell, nothing inspires a contemptible eye-roll like a person asking a waiter in a restaurant if they have gluten-free options. By some stretch of the known laws of cause-and-effect, the removal of gluten from someone’s diet apparently causes irreparable harm to people with knowledge of the decision and deserves unequivocal reprobation. Otherwise, why else would they care so much?

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Dietary Fiber Is Bad for Sex – That’s the Only Claim About It That Isn’t a Myth

Today’s article is a guest post from Konstantin Monastyrsky of GutSense.org. In keeping with the mission statement of Mark’s Daily Apple to investigate, discuss, and critically rethink everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness, I like to periodically give credible researchers who are challenging conventional wisdom the opportunity to share their insights and findings here. It’s a great way to open a dialogue on topics that deserve challenging. Like fiber, for instance. Everyone knows that fiber is good for you, right? Well, let’s find out what Konstantin—a guy who’s spent an incredible amount of time researching this topic—thinks about this truism. Enter Konstantin…

Does dietary fiber contain anything of nutritional value? No, it doesn’t. Zero vitamins… Zero minerals… Zero protein… Zero fat… Nothing, zilch, not even digestible carbohydrates. Why, then, is it considered a healthy nutrient? As the story goes, you can thank Dr. John Harvey Kellogg for that:

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Dear Mark: Am I Eating Too Little Food or Too Much Iron?

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, we’ve got a two-parter. First, Mathilde wonders whether she’s eating too little food. A high-fat, nutrient-dense Primal way of eating can have the effect of maximal satiation on fewer calories, and that’s usually fine, but there are instances where too few calories can have negative health effects. I tell her what symptoms to watch out for. After that, I discuss the issue of too much iron in the diet. It may be a concern for people with genetic tendencies to store excessive amount of iron, but what about regular people without those genetic variants?

Let’s go:

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Weekend Link Love – Edition 259

Research of the Week
Chopping wood boosts testosterone more than playing sports.

This news fills me with confidence: 9 out of 10 new drugs are no more (or even less) effective than their predecessors.

When smokers quit, they often gain weight, but not because of increased calorie intake. It’s the change in gut flora, according to new research.
Interesting Blog Posts
How the future of psychiatry may lie inside our guts.

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