Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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January 15, 2017

Weekend Link Love – Edition 435

By Mark Sisson
22 Comments

weekend_linklove in-lineRESEARCH OF THE WEEK

There’s strong evidence that eating foods high in flavonoids can stave off death.

Vitamin B12 toothpaste improves B12 status in vegans. Another option is to put raw beef liver in your socks while you sleep.

Humans were in North America at least 24,000 years ago.

Eating Brazil nuts and drinking green tea improves biomarkers related to colorectal cancer.

Alcohol makes it harder for mice to forget scary memories (imagine what it does for PTSD patients).

Revenge feels pretty good.

Menopause may have arisen so grandmothers would stop competing with their daughters for mates.

Squats save lives.

Calorie for calorie, high glycemic carbs promote greater liver fat gain than lower glycemic carbs.

Increased statin utilization had no impact on cardiovascular mortality in Western Europe.

NEW PRIMAL BLUEPRINT PODCASTS
pb-podcast-banner-142

Episode 151: Dr. Cate Shanahan Part 2: Host Brad Kearns welcomes Dr. Shanahan back to the podcast to discuss the myriad reasons not to eat polyunsaturated seed oils.

Each week, select Mark’s Daily Apple blog posts are prepared as Primal Blueprint Podcasts. Need to catch up on reading, but don’t have the time? Prefer to listen to articles while on the go? Check out the new blog post podcasts below, and subscribe to the Primal Blueprint Podcast here so you never miss an episode.

INTERESTING BLOG POSTS

The case for 3 eggs a day.

How to train well-being.

“Not a single human has touched the edge of the truth of Go.” And maybe never will.

MEDIA, SCHMEDIA

A Swiss town has denied a passport to a vegan for being too annoying.

Scientists are editing food with CRISPR. 

EVERYTHING ELSE

The most amazing thing about this Pakistani strong man is that he only “started gaining weight in his teens.”

Of course Oregon has a thing called goat yoga and of course it has a 900 person waiting list.

A discussion of the interplay between culture and evolution.

This guy’s gym is garbage.

More people are getting hip to blue light’s effect on health.

Green war.

A new breathalyzer tests for 16 different diseases.

A snowstorm made a Portland Zoo polar bear (and elephant) very happy.

It was rather cold.

THINGS I’M UP TO AND INTERESTED IN

Term I wish I’d coined: “Overfat.”

Announcements I’d like to make: Buy the Primal Kitchen Whole30 Kit, get a free bottle of Primal Kitchen Ranch. There’s also the Vital Farms contest (win a month of pastured eggs and a Whole30 Kit) and the PK Chipotle Lime Mayo contest. Enter them all!

Better than fillings: Dental stem cells.

Product digital addicts might find useful: The anti-smartphone.

Inevitable news I’ve been dreading: Woman dies from bacteria resistant to every antibiotic available in the US.

RECIPE CORNER

TIME CAPSULE

One year ago (Dec 4– Dec 10)

COMMENT OF THE WEEK

If you see someone with a dead buck on his shoulders walking the neighborhood while naked and barefoot in zero degree weather and playing an accordion…it could be me! At the police station I’m gonna blame Sisson.

– I’ll accept responsibility, Nocona.

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22 Comments on "Weekend Link Love – Edition 435"

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bill
8 months 9 days ago

Three eggs a day? So you mean I gotta
cut out 4 of the eggs I eat each day?

Bob Niland
8 months 9 days ago

re: Increased statin utilization had no impact on cardiovascular mortality in Western Europe.

Note carefully that the paper looked only at CVD mortality, and not all-cause mortality.

We might presume from the paper:
“well, OK, it’s wash”,
but in fact there may be quite a bit of overlooked downside in terms of quality-of-life side effects, and premature departure due to some of those. Anyone on or contemplating a statin needs to consider all outcomes.

JenK
JenK
8 months 9 days ago

Hi Mark, I think you’ve got the goat yoga link messed up with the high/low glycemic carb link. Thanks

Jack
Jack
8 months 9 days ago

Raw beef liver with a little horseradish on top, awesome. Otherwise try it while you sleep.

Shary
Shary
8 months 8 days ago

Yech! I don’t like anything about beef liver and certainly not raw. Nasty stuff. But perhaps as a facial, pulverized with a raw egg, a little lemon juice, some EVOO… Hmm. Now THAT might be worth a try.

His Dudeness
His Dudeness
8 months 8 days ago

It’s actually better raw than cooked. I make a smoothie, treating it as a sweet ingredient.

Nocona
Nocona
8 months 9 days ago

Fantastic 4 minute video of the man that made a gym from beach garbage. I’m ready to go visit.
Bullets into flowers, sign me up.

Rima
Rima
8 months 8 days ago

Yay Oregon, not one , but two references this week. Been watching the zoo animals playing in the snow. Polar bears love the snow, who’da thunk! As for the Goat Yoga, well I live in Albany and hadn’t heard of it! Always something fun here on Sunday, thanks Mark.

John
John
8 months 8 days ago
Ok, this blue light thing….. Is it just the blue light that enters the eyes, or blue light on our skin everywhere, that is supposedly bad for us? My confusion stems from 1) the lack of clarity in articles (including the one referenced today) about where the problem lies, and 2) previous articles (and innumerable ads) touting “blue blocker” glasses to help with the issue. If it is just blue light in our eyes, then how does melatonin come in to play? If it is everywhere on our skin, then blocking it from the eyes seems of little use. Anyone… Read more »
Ben
Ben
8 months 8 days ago

Just for clarity, you’re not confusing the sleep hormone melatonin, with the skin pigment melanin are you? Melanin is present on skin and gives our skin color, while melatonin is produced by the pineal gland and regulates sleepiness.

John
John
8 months 7 days ago

Ben – thanks for the clarification – in fact I *was* confusing the two.

So… does that mean that it’s all about the light which enters the eyes, and not so much about what might be falling on our skin?

Ross
Ross
8 months 8 days ago

“There’s strong evidence that eating foods high in flavonoids can stave off death.”

This could be why, standing at the guillotine, Louis XVI when asked if he had any final requests, ordered an onion and parsley salad.

HealthyHombre
HealthyHombre
8 months 8 days ago

The video of Alcindo Soares building a gym on the beach from material washed up on shore from the ocean was one of the coolest things I seen in a long time.

Elenor
Elenor
8 months 8 days ago
Cultural Differences May Leave Their Mark on DNA https://www.amren.com/news/2017/01/cultural-differences-may-leave-mark-dna/ … The study examined DNA methylation—an “annotation” of DNA that alters gene expression without changing the genomic sequence itself—in a group of diverse Latino children. Methylation is one type of “epigenetic mark” that previous research has shown can be either inherited or altered by life experience. The researchers identified several hundred differences in methylation associated with either Mexican or Puerto Rican ethnicity, but discovered that only three-quarters of the epigenetic difference between the two ethnic subgroups could be accounted for by differences in the children’s genetic ancestry. The rest of the… Read more »
Elizabeth Resnick
8 months 8 days ago

I’m wearing my orange goggles as I read this on Sunday night. And looking forward to my three eggs in the am. But that’s not because of any studies. I really enjoy my eggs! (And Brazil nuts and green tea.)

Shary
Shary
8 months 8 days ago
“Menopause may have arisen so grandmothers would stop competing with their daughters for mates.” What a ridiculous notion. Dr. Croft obviously doesn’t know squat about women. Menopause probably arose because it takes 18 years to raise a human being to the point of being at least partially independent, and sometimes more like 30 years when the offspring are less than ambitious. The whole process is far too exhausting for the human body to be able to sustain fertility into old age–not that any of it has much to do with grandmothers hitting on their daughter’s mates on rare occasion. I actually… Read more »
BeLikeGrok
BeLikeGrok
8 months 6 days ago

Shary – considering 18 to be “adulthood” and the point of independence is a relatively modern convention. Humans are quite capable of being independent at much younger ages and, thousands (even hundreds) of years ago, would have been quite independent at ages much less than 18. Like 10,11,12 – otherwise known as the years humans generally become fertile and able to have offspring.

18 is an arbitrary number picked some time ago for a reason that probably doesn’t make sense.

Flossie
Flossie
6 months 8 days ago

I would add a wrinkle to the menopause hypothesis. Many of us who’ve experienced it will testify to the fact that the post-menopausal metabolism slows to a crawl. As annoying as this is, there’s a perfectly logical evolutionary explanation. In stark terms, a woman who cannot (or can no longer) reproduce is a waste of the tribe’s precious resources. What better way to ensure her continued usefulness to the tribe than for the post-menopausal woman’s caloric needs to shrink to nearly nothing?

His Dudeness
His Dudeness
8 months 8 days ago

I know how that reindeer feels. It’s been a cold couple of months at the airport here in Hoth Dakota.

Ion Freeman
8 months 8 days ago
Ah… that’s a weird egg study. I might have divided them into group of ten men and ten women each and gone 0-0-0-0, 0-1-2,3, 0-3-2-1, 0-2-3-1, or even 0-0-0-0, 0-1-1-1, 0-2-2-2, 0-3-3-3 instead of 0-1-2-3 for all forty participants. Maybe having an egg per day for 12 weeks has a better effect on your blood than an egg a day for four weeks. The first listed author is a Ph.D. candidate. Her advisor and other faculty are listed later. That seems weird, too. I linked to the paper with my name. If you’ve got PubMed access, what’s the rationale for… Read more »
Mark
8 months 8 days ago

I was just thinking this week that I’d like a phone so that I am contactable, but without all the apps that I know I’ll inevitably over-use. The anti smartphone looks interesting. I thought I was going to have to dig out an old Nokia.

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