Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

Tell Me More
Stay Connected
August 11, 2013

Weekend Link Love – Edition 255

By Mark Sisson
55 Comments

Weekend Link LoveResearch of the Week

Using a computer to simulate one second of human brain activity takes 40 minutes, 1 petabyte of RAM, and nearly 83,000 processors. Ray Kurzweil might be waiting a bit longer than he imagined for the Singularity to arrive.

In a recent observational study, having four or more caffeinated (but not decaf) cups of coffee per day was associated with the lowest risk of suicide.

Interesting Blog Posts

A couple weeks back, I discussed the saturated fat tax being proposed in New Zealand. Well, Professor Grant Schofield wrote a great blog response to it. Be sure to check out the comments (one of the NZ health experts proposing the tax chimes in – and gets politely trounced).

In the first of a body image series on Paleo Periodical, Tara Grant gives her thoughts on what paleo looks like.

I’d say this is a fair, balanced take on GMOs. Wouldn’t you?

Media, Schmedia

Drop whatever you’re eating, folks, and rush over to McDonald’s. You wouldn’t want to miss out on the cheapest and most nutritious food in human history, would you?

Now for some (real) good news: the obesity rate is dropping among poor children.

The world’s first lab-grown stem cell “burger” has been eaten. It’s “close to meat.”

How life in American may actually drive you insane. It goes much, much deeper than food or pharmaceuticals, unfortunately.

Everything Else

Sweat-working, a different kind of business networking that involves heavy breathing, exercise bikes, and (occasionally) spandex.

Do we really need diapers that analyze the protein contents of a kid’s urine? I can’t wait for the adult versions. Quantified Self conferences full of adults making crinkling noises every time they sit down, anyone?

How you might be able to tell people’s socioeconomic statuses by the kinds of toxins in their bodies.

A history of our love affair with sugar.

Recipe Corner

  • There’s really nothing quite so satisfying as a stew. Heck, even the name is satisfying to say: “stew.” Then you add “Caribbean Fish” on to that and get something really good going.
  • Turkey doesn’t get enough attention. Sure, it gets an entire holiday devoted to it, but what about the other 364 days? Now go on and make some Thai spiced turkey burgers to make up for it.

Time Capsule

One year ago (Aug 11 – Aug 17)

Comment of the Week

There are major health drawbacks to beer. That’s why I only drink grain alcohol and rainwater. One must protect one’s precious bodily fluids.

– Everyone should go watch Dr. Strangelove right now, if they haven’t yet. Fantastic movie.

Subscribe to the Newsletter

If you'd like to add an avatar to all of your comments click here!

Leave a Reply

55 Comments on "Weekend Link Love – Edition 255"

avatar

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Robert Massa
Robert Massa
3 years 1 month ago

The numbers cited are actually for 1% of a brain. So it would take ~2.5 days to simulate a complete brain.

Brendan Coburn
3 years 1 month ago

Wow. Just startling. I don’t think we’ll ever replicate or fully understand the power of the human brain!

zimage
zimage
3 years 1 month ago

About this human brain simulation — if computational speed keeps increasing as it did for the past 40 year, rougly doubling each year, then: now it takes 40 minutes to simulate 1 second, which is 2400:1 ratio, then maybe it’s going to be 1200:1 in a year, 600:1 in two years, 300:1 in 3 years, … … … 1:1.17 in eleven years, 1:0.58 in twelve years.

Well, it surely is more complex than this, but I think I made my point…

Keerthy
Keerthy
3 years 1 month ago
Computational speed increase is governed by Moore’s law which roughly implies that the transistor count in cpu will double every 18 months. This has been true for the decades gone by and continue to be true. However this doesn’t guarantee an increase in computational speed per se … More cpu power doesn’t equal more cpu speed. Current generation of s/w applications or programming paradigm were built for single cpu or few multiple cpu execution and cannot take advantage of massively multi-core cpus. Also the current paradigm of programming doesn’t resemble brain networks (atleast physically). Brain network elements (neurons) do both… Read more »
Jessica
Jessica
3 years 1 month ago

That whooshing sound is everything you just said going wayyy over my head.

Jessica
Jessica
3 years 1 month ago

And I’m an electronics tech to boot.

ngyoung
ngyoung
3 years 1 month ago

The limitations of lithography that chip makers use is reaching it’s critical limits. Moore’s law will not be sustainable pretty soon unless they figure out a new process. Plus since about 22nm-14nm the payoff has become less and less for power and speed compared to size gained. Analog devices on a given chip are roughly staying about the same size as previous generations.

Paleo Bon Rurgundy
3 years 1 month ago

Two words: graphene ICs.

gunny7th
gunny7th
3 years 1 month ago

…can process quickly…but can’t remember where it left the car keys…

2Rae
2Rae
3 years 1 month ago

RE: the brain. Interesting photos, all that room needed for one percent/one second. 100% fits in our skulls, seems as though we had a better designer than the computer designers.

Matt
3 years 1 month ago

That was great about the burger being the most nutritious yet cheapest food….

Jennifer
Jennifer
3 years 1 month ago

I appreciate the fair and balanced article on GMO’s, but honestly, there was no need to establish hippie credentials. There are hundreds of pro-GMO articles written by scientists. Almost all of them are working to improve human life, including those that work for Monsanto.

zimage
zimage
3 years 1 month ago

Oops, if this is for 1%, then it’s going to take 17 years instead of 11 to reach 100% real time.

Our design definitely took some time. Computers are evolving a whole lot faster.

RenatoAF
RenatoAF
3 years 1 month ago

In the past they measured it in room sized computers and every few years did the calculations again after learning a whole lot more about the brain and about computers.. I would not be surprised at all if in the future they have the computer power x40 and still state that it’s way shorter than a real brain can accomplish due to knowing more about its complexities.

Primal_Alex
3 years 1 month ago

Synthetic meat… grown in lab. Missing taste, texture, missing fats and I’m pretty sure it’s missing micronutrients as well. I’m curious to see the side effects of such an abomination in 20/30 years from now.

Beccolina
Beccolina
3 years 1 month ago

I’m sure it will be touted as the “cheapest, most nutritious” food ever, while paying no attention at all to the actual nutrition it contains (or lacks).

Kevin
Kevin
3 years 1 month ago

Theirs too many people on the planet though, we’re going to have to find an adequate solution to feeding everybody soon.

If they can synthesize meat that has enough regulations to ensure us that it is both healthy and safe to consume, I’ll be the first in line to eat it.

Primal_Alex
Primal_Alex
3 years 1 month ago
Current regulations are here to assure us that soy, wheat, vegetable oils are safe. If you find a package of pure white fructose sugar you can read (at least here in Switzerland) “it gives you a boost of energy by restoring your reserves in your muscles”, and here in MDA we know that this is not true, fructose will just make your liver sick. I’d always be suspicious of everything regulations say, especially when there are economical interests behind. Grass fed meat has proven to be safe even since before humans walked on Earth, if it weren’t every animal would… Read more »
Camilo Palacios
Camilo Palacios
3 years 1 month ago
The article with the rebuttal of the tax butter in NZ was really good. I have tried to explain to my parents several times how fat is not the culprit of heart disease or other modern diseases. They however do not want to believe me. My family has a rich history of CVD and the doctors always recommend a low fat diet, coupled with “healthy” rice and whole grains. They don’t want to go against what the doctor says. Too bad they only speak Spanish, wish your site had a Spanish version. Anybody in the community know any good Spanish… Read more »
Christine
Christine
3 years 1 month ago

Try going to http://translate.google.com and put http://www.marksdailyapple.com in the box and select English, then select Spanish in the 2nd box and then click on the link in the 2nd box to bring up a Spanish version.

Jon
Jon
3 years 1 month ago

If they open it with google chrome, there’s a built-in translator.

JenniferR
JenniferR
3 years 1 month ago

Robb Wolf regularly posts articles in spanish.

Sigrún
Sigrún
3 years 1 month ago

You may also want to check the site below out. It is some of Robb Wolf’s Paleo Solution blog posts, in Spanish.

http://robbwolf.com/category/spanish/

Paul
Paul
3 years 1 month ago
One reason I no longer trust nutritionists, doctors, and academic types to tell me how to live, is because a lot of them now seem fixated on advancing leftist ideology over doing actual sound science. Read the comments on the NZ post. Some “expert” chiming in goes on about greenhouse gases and sustainability. What the hell does he even know about environmental science, physics, engineering, and agriculture? Nothing, is the answer. Climate change being caused by greenhouse gases emitted by humans has been so thoroughly debunked by ACTUAL, HARD science, that when these dolts come out and lecture about how… Read more »
Kiwi Grokette
Kiwi Grokette
3 years 1 month ago

+1
I live in NZ and some of us are getting pretty sick of these idiots trying to control us!

Michael
Michael
3 years 1 month ago

Your tinfoil hat seems to be leaking brain juice.

Also, you pay less taxes than any other industrialized country, and less taxes than have been paid by Americans in 90 years. WTF is this “Marxism” you’re crying about?

Paul
Paul
3 years 1 month ago
America has the highest corporate tax rate in the first world. The government collectively controls over a 5th of the economic output of this nation. It spends at an astronomical rate on social programs that do not work effectively. At the same time, the government picks winners and losers by allowing companies like General Electric to get away with paying no taxes for years on end, while levying steep taxes on other companies. Do you know what companies do when you levy more taxes on them? They pass it on to the customers by raising prices of goods. The government… Read more »
Rebekah
3 years 1 month ago

+1,000,000

Paleo Bon Burgundy
3 years 1 month ago

Hooray for a non-Keynesian!

Joshua
Joshua
3 years 1 month ago

Marxism is a belief system manifested by socialism. We don’t need to have complete government ownership of the means of production in order for folks who would like to spread their belief system to be advancing their agenda. So while you use ad hominem arguments to disparage people who don’t agree with you, you cannot deny the direction in many countries toward more government control of people and resources.

Kelly MC
Kelly MC
3 years 1 month ago

“Climate change being caused by greenhouse gases emitted by humans has been so thoroughly debunked by ACTUAL, HARD science”

Really? Prove it. Copy and paste links showing this is true. Incidentally, how well read are you regarding biostats? Just because a “study” was done, doesn’t prove that it was a well designed, or even accurate, study. I don’t feel like message board fighting, so please, provide evidence that supports your claims.

Jason
Jason
3 years 1 month ago

The climate change denier’s quote is akin to the statement about McDonald’s burgers.

SMH

Andrew
Andrew
3 years 1 month ago
Well Kelly, I must agree with you, but not for the standard reasons you think are underlying human-caused climate change. Humans definitely are changing the climate, but it is occuring through massive, illegal and undeclared geoengineering via aerial spraying on a worldwide scale. Personally, I am staggered to see how divorced from and clueless humanity is to this reality. Look up in the sky–often, from morning to evening. Do you actually believe those are clouds coming out of all those high-altitute jets criss-crossing major urban areas, leaving a checkerboard of “contrails” that meld into a silver soup where once there… Read more »
Sharon
Sharon
3 years 1 month ago

Wow Andrew, you must be really freaked out on a daily bases. You seem to be entrenched in your opinion but just in case you or someone else is curious about contrails, I thought this website had some really good information. http://contrailscience.com/why-do-some-planes-leave-long-trails-but-others-dont/

Paul
Paul
3 years 1 month ago

Are you familiar with Svensmarks theory of climate change? His work is experimentally supported by CERN, peer reviewed, and readily available for anyone interested to read. He even has a documentary available on youtube where he explains the theory, and the mechanism that drives climate change.

Groktimus Primal
3 years 1 month ago

The modern world definitely leaves us depressed. Finally we are connected enough to see our leaders are corrupt and most of our jobs are meangless, low pay and probably highly temporary. Almost nothing is what it seems just like Conevtional Wisdom. We look for meaning in work and life and there is none so we earn a bare living by sucking ass at job that need not exist. Causing slow insanity.

Nikki Ledford
3 years 1 month ago

Thanks for the ping back! Fish stew for everyone!

Jan Rendek
Jan Rendek
3 years 1 month ago

Love the article about sugar. My advice to anyone wanting to live better is to ditch sugar immediately. Just this simple step can do miracles.

Kiwi Grokette
Kiwi Grokette
3 years 1 month ago

Totally agree, one of the best things I ever did!

Jst
Jst
3 years 1 month ago

I also wouldn’t underestimate exponential growth of technology/computers.

Re: coffee – I don’t really understand kinda biased view leaning to coffee (ab)use on this site. There are so many conflicting studies about it and also some people just don’t handle it very well. Reading this site gives me the impression that coffee is good for me but my body and mind both disagree in the long term. Also, can’t imagine regular grok having the amount of caffeine of even 1 cup every day. That said, it’s damn hard NOT to drink. Another reason to be suspicious of it. Addiction much?

pup
pup
3 years 1 month ago
It was interesting to see the sugar story framed around not only my home town, but also the school I attended for two years. (It was a middle school at the time, 30 years ago.) I don’t remember any coke machines when I was there, and certainly no pop tarts, so things obviously went the wrong way for a while. It’s impossible for me to imagine why an elementary school would ever need a coke machine, but perhaps that’s more the norm these days than I care to believe. When I was there, the cafeteria food was processed and plain,… Read more »
Amy
3 years 1 month ago

‘Southern cooking’ is not why the deep South is fat; it’s systemic poverty, a love of soda (sweet tea’s evil cousin), and old-fashioned racism (apathy coupled with lack of resources). Poor people choose between bland supermarket fare or fast food, made affordable off the backs of other poor people who work these industries and most likely do not make a living wage. Southern cooking, on the other hand, is delicious, and can easily be primal-ized.

pup
pup
3 years 1 month ago

So, you’re saying that southern food is good for you, once you take out all the bad stuff. Therefore, racism.

Sorry, but drawing a distinction between ‘southern’ food and ‘poor’ food tells me that you either a) have never spent much time in the south; or b) picked up a pair of the extra strong blinders at the denial store.

And I don’t recall the cafeteria at Kirkpatrick serving different food to the white kids.

Yes, it is surprising how many po’ folk manage to die from diseases of affluence, but sometimes the rich folk, they eat bad too.

Andrew
Andrew
3 years 1 month ago

The future looks particularly Orwellian when, besides all the usual madness, people are already pushing test-tube hamburger upon us.

Can you say “conditioning” anyone?

Brad
Brad
3 years 1 month ago

Made the Caribbean Fish Stew tonight. Quite tasty! The wife gave it a thumbs up so it is going in the “keep-recipe” file. Thanks!

Nikki Ledford
3 years 1 month ago

Thanks for making it! Glad Mark was kind enough to share it 🙂

Ash Simmonds
3 years 1 month ago

Haha, I wrote a bunch of stuff on the McDouble thing a couple weeks ago: http://highsteaks.com/mcdonalds-mcdouble-greatest-most-bountiful-source-of-nutrition-or-death-on-a-bun/

SayMoi
SayMoi
3 years 1 month ago

The stem cell article raises a good point though. Good meat is hard enough to come by now; what will we as a community do if a crisis raises prices to, say, $20/lb?

trackback

[…] Research of the Week Using a computer to simulate one second of human brain activity takes 40 minutes, 1 petabyte of RAM, and nearly 83,000 processors. Ray Kurzweil might be waiting a bit longer than he imagined for the Singularity to arrive. In a recent observational study, having four or more caffeinated (but not decaf) […]… Mark’s Daily Apple […]

Dayu Machine
3 years 1 month ago

It was amazing for humanbeings undestanding brain network elements

ben
ben
3 years 1 month ago

Re: the McDouble:

Trade Joe’s peanut butter is $2.50. No added ingredients. Roughly 2,000 calories. Trumps the hell out of a McDouble. (I know a bunch of people on here don’t eat peanuts, but if you had to choose between peanuts and fast food…)

Les
Les
3 years 1 month ago

I see no difference. Peanut butter is made from peanuts, which are legumes. McDonalds burgers are made from grain-fed beef and assorted corn-derived additives. At least with the burger, I would be getting some SFAs. Of course I would be ditching the bun.

Airi
3 years 1 month ago

We really should protect our self.

Anna
3 years 1 month ago

Well, having the percentage of poor children obesity decreasing is great. Although fast food is cheap it is a problem for obesity in children. As well those recipe sound pretty good, I might check that out. Also having 4 cups or more of coffee a day seems pretty extreme although, interesting to know that it lowers the rate of suicide.

wpDiscuz