Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.
15 Aug

Spoutin’ Off on Veganism (Again)

veganReaders Mike and Danielle wrote last week inquiring as to what vegans can do to stay on a Primal Health path. The full letter is below, but I will draw from a few quotes first to give my thoughts on specific elements.

As you know, I am an omnivore and believe we have clearly evolved as omnivores. (For the record, my wife eats fish and certain protein powders, but is otherwise “vegetarian”; my 13-year-old son is 100% vegetarian and has never eaten flesh in his life; my 16-year-old daughter is omnivorous). Most evolutionary biologists will tell you that there has never been a culture that existed entirely without animal products of any kind, although apparently some Hindu sects claim to have done so. I question even that.

Clearly, our digestive systems evolved to efficiently handle an incredibly vast array of animal and vegetable foods. In fact, that ability is what fueled our migration out of Africa and across this planet. The genetic blueprint that resulted from our evolution gives each of us, at least in theory, the digestive tools to enjoy beef, chicken, fish, lamb and all the side dishes and dessert we can eat. Nevertheless, citing religious, ethical or health reasons, some people choose to live as vegans, eschewing all forms of animal flesh and often avoiding other animal products (leather belts, gelatin capsules, candies, etc). How, then, is it possible – or is it even feasible – for vegans to thrive in this world? I don’t have the answer, but I do have some observations based on my model of Primal Health.

One of the first comments Mike makes is ironic, but probably typical of initial converts to veganism:

“We became vegan partly for health reasons, but the diet we had adopted wasn’t very much different than the diet we left, as we were still consuming large amounts of highly processed foods, and not nearly enough fruits and vegetables. It seems that modern life has made it possible to be vegetarian or vegan without ever actually needing to consume vegetables. Who would’ve thought of that?”

If being vegan means simply avoiding all animal products, then it’s a slam dunk to find an almost infinite variety among the center aisles of your grocery store. Unlike the British colonists of the 1600s who were grateful to eat whatever flesh they could get (even each other), we Americans now have the luxury of excess calories in the 21st century. The average American eats as many as 4,000 calories daily – over twice what nearly anyone would typically need to survive. Processed foods are everywhere, and one could easily be a nominal vegan existing on the likes of soft drinks, soy pizzas, whole wheat crackers, and Rice-a-Roni, but as you know from reading this blog, processed foods are the bane of a healthy lifestyle. And as Mike says, they turned to veganism for health reasons. So we will assume that being vegan also means being on a quest to achieve some measure of good health.

The fruit and vegetable part of true dedicated healthy veganism probably needs little discussion. If you’ve followed what we write here, you know that I make vegetables the very base of my food pyramid. As a source of most important micronutrients, there is nothing that beats a variety of fresh, organic, dark, and colored vegetables and berries. If I were vegan, I’d be more concerned with limiting the fruit sugars than worried about getting enough of them.

One of my biggest concerns for my son the vegetarian is that he is getting enough protein to fuel his growing athletic body. Luckily, he has agreed to supplement his diet with a protein powder that my company makes, and he is otherwise very diligent about consuming nuts and legumes with his vegetable meals to provide as wide an array of amino acids as possible. There are 22 amino acids that humans use to manufacture muscle and other vital tissue. Miss out on a few of the essential aminos and you dramatically reduce your body’s ability to repair and regenerate. For vegans who avoid even protein powders from eggs, milk or whey, getting quality protein is without a doubt the biggest challenge. And not everyone is suited to consuming the traditional alternative protein sources, as Mike points out:

“We realize that quinoa, tempeh and beans can serve as good protein sources for vegans, but that seems limited. I also find that some of these non-animal sources of protein greatly upset my digestive system, especially tofu and tempeh. I have to be very careful when consuming either of these foods to ensure that I don’t eat too much, as it can cause immense intestinal distress.”

This is a problem. It IS a limited menu. Furthermore, intestinal distress is a key indicator that something is not working right in the diet and needs to be changed. I am not a fan of grains of any type, believing strongly that we cannot handle the digestion of these grass seeds (although quinoa isn’t technically a grass, its seeds are unpalatable unless processed properly and cooked). Keep in mind that grains have only been around for human consumption for less than 10,000 years – in evolutionary terms, simply not long enough for us to have adapted a grain-based digestive system. There are many vegans who rely on a variety of grains to supply protein, but they can sometimes encounter other health issues such as celiac sprue, a condition in which the gluten in grains causes destruction of part of the intestine and a resulting loss in ability to absorb critical nutrients. Ultimately, even the most efficient of the grains supply only about 20% of total calories in the form of protein. The rest of those calories are carbohydrates.

Soy-based foods such as tempeh, while fermented or otherwise processed to render the protein more digestible – and therefore probably as good a protein source as a vegan can find – can still cause gastric distress in some people and mild allergic reactions in some others. Furthermore, the jury is still out on the health benefits of soy, particularly among those whose intake is unusually high in an effort to consume more protein (say, exceeding 30 grams soy protein a day). I do let my son eat a bowl of edamame once or twice a week.

And that gets us to the crux of Mike and Danilelle’s dilemma:

“My wife enjoys cooking, and I enjoy her meals. She doesn’t want to subsist on a diet of meals that she doesn’t like to cook due to lack of variety in the ingredients themselves or lack of variety in the way in which they’re prepared. Do you have any advice on how vegans can find variety and satisfaction in their meal choices, at least in terms of fulfilling daily requirements for protein intake and other nutritional needs?”

That’s really what it’s all about. How can vegans look forward to what is arguably one of the most enjoyable activities that humans undertake – eating a satisfying meal – without feeling as if overwhelming compromises were made? That’s where Danielle and her kitchen skills get put to work. I would start by actively seeking greater variety in the ingredients by scouting the organic fresh fruit and vegetable choices available at some of the larger national chains like Whole Foods and Wild Oats.

– If vegetables are to be the base of your diet – and they have to be – get to know every vegetable there is.

– Keep that spice rack full of exciting taste options.

– I’d look at adding nut butters and/or raw nuts to those vegetable dishes to add flavor, healthy fats and some extra protein. Speaking of fats, I’d eat avocados, I’d dress salads with olive oil and I’d cook with olive oil or coconut oil. I’d scour the healthy cookbooks for exciting new salad recipes and, yes, I’d add ground flax seed often. I’m not big on potatoes, but the occasional yam, rutabaga, lima beans and the like would make fair protein substitutes once in a while. Find eight or ten healthy dishes you love and don’t be afraid to have them often.

Realize that when you choose a vegan lifestyle, you are probably electing to eat a higher percentage of calories from carbohydrate than your Primal Health omnivore neighbors. While it’s not ideal in my book, as SNL self-help guru Stuart Smalley would say, “that’s OK.” However, it does put a slightly greater onus on you to keep up with your exercise routine. I would also definitely supplement with a good high-potency multi-vitamin and make sure I got sunlight for 15 minutes any sunny day. So Mike and Danielle, I think that with a little research and effort, you can arrive at a point where healthy meets tasty and still be fairly close to the Primal Health ideal.

Further Reading:

My Carb Pyramid

10 Terrific Carbs

What I Eat in a Day

My Escape from Vegan Island

Mike and Danielle’s Letter:

Hi Mr. Sisson,

My wife and I have been reading your blog, as well as Arthur De Vany’s blog for a few months now. Your insights on nutrition have introduced us to a new way of eating and living, and for that we thank you both. We’re starting to incorporate much more fruits and vegetables into our diet and eliminate most of the starchy, grain-filled, processed foods that we normally gorged ourselves on, such as white rice, bread and mock meats. However, my wife has some reservations about what this new style of eating holds in store for her cooking abilities.

We’re both vegan. I’ve been vegan for roughly 7 years, and she’s been vegan for about 3 years. Most of that time we’ve been dining on lots of tofu, beans, grains and assorted meat analogs. She’s pretty much been tailoring traditional recipes to our diet. After reading your blog, we realized that we were engaging in a self-defeating process. We became vegan partly for health reasons, but the diet we had adopted wasn’t very much different than the diet we left, as we were still consuming large amounts of highly processed foods, and not nearly enough fruits and vegetables. It seems that modern life has made it possible to be vegetarian or vegan without ever actually needing to consume vegetables. Who would’ve thought of that?

Anyway, the last few weeks we’ve been changing our diet in light of yours and Mr. De Vany’s recommendations. Being vegan, we don’t want to rely on tofu and mock meats for all of our protein requirements, as this does not seem conducive to good health because it is so highly processed. We realize that quinoa, tempeh and beans can serve as good protein sources for vegans, but that seems limited. I also find that some of these non-animal sources of protein greatly upset my digestive system, especially tofu and tempeh. I have to be very careful when consuming either of these foods to ensure that I don’t eat too much, as it can cause immense intestinal distress.

My wife enjoys cooking, and I enjoy her meals. She doesn’t want to subsist on a diet of meals that she doesn’t like to cook due to lack of variety in the ingredients themselves or lack of variety in the way in which they’re prepared. Do you have any advice on how vegans can find variety and satisfaction in their meal choices, at least in terms of fulfilling daily requirements for protein intake and other nutritional needs?

I realize that both you and Mr. De Vany espouse an omnivorous diet, and, as such, probably do not see the vegan diet as the optimal diet for humans to prosper, but my wife and I are both morally opposed to factory farming, and will not purchase animal products produced in this manner. We are also uncomfortable with smaller scale, local or organic animal products, so this would not be an option either. Given this information, I realize that you may not be able to offer much advice, but I thought that it wouldn’t hurt to ask. I realize your advice may just be “you should incorporate animal products such as grass-fed beef, wild salmon, and organic eggs into your diet, and you’d have no need to worry about meeting such requirements,” but this is not an option for us. Any advice or help you could offer given our dietary restrictions would be much appreciated.

We look forward to reading your response, and thank you again for your blog. It has been inspirational.

Sincerely,

Mike and Danielle Drew

P.S. We realize that vitamin B-12 deficiency can be a problem for vegans, but we both take a daily multi-vitamin and consume foods fortified with vitamin B-12, such as soy milk. I’m not entirely sure that these are the best sources for B-12, or whether it’s absorbed well enough, but it was my understanding that the body only needs a small amount of B-12 each day. I also understand that our bodies can store B-12 in reserve for a long period of time, so I hope that fortifying our diet in this way keeps us healthy in terms of B-12 intake.

A second potential problem could be adequate consumption of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. I think this could be solved by supplementing our diet with flax seeds or flax seed oil, though I have heard that the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids is also important, and that flax seed is not the ideal source because of this ratio. This is another aspect that my wife and I must research further.

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You want comments? We got comments:

Imagine you’re George Clooney. Take a moment to admire your grooming and wit. Okay, now imagine someone walks up to you and asks, “What’s your name?” You say, “I’m George Clooney.” Or maybe you say, “I’m the Clooninator!” You don’t say “I’m George of George Clooney Sells Movies Blog” and you certainly don’t say, “I’m Clooney Weight Loss Plan”. So while spam is technically meat, it ain’t anywhere near Primal. Please nickname yourself something your friends would call you.

  1. Wow, Mark. Thanks for the highly detailed response. As I’m at work now, I can’t formulate a proper reply yet, but I just wanted to drop by and let you know how much I appreciate you addressing our concerns. On a preliminary note, Danielle and I have been integrating more nuts and nut butter into our diet, and I’ve even switched from peanut butter to raw almond butter, much to my taste buds’ delight I might add. We’re still feeling our way through incorporating more variety into our diet, but your blog is certainly helping us get the hang of it. I’ll provide a more detailed response once I get home and speak with my wife. Thanks again.

    Mike Drew wrote on August 15th, 2007
  2. Two words – Indian food. Plenty of vegan selections (and a ton more vegetarian selections).

    Lee wrote on August 15th, 2007
  3. Or just move to L.A. I’ve got three Vegan restaurants in walking distance from my house.

    McFly wrote on August 15th, 2007
  4. This is by far the most exciting post in your blog yet. Mostly in part because it’s about my family. ;) This is Danielle. Mel Practice is my roller derby name. I’m on the Pittsburgh roller derby team which gives me plenty of physical activity. We train pretty hard, what would you suggest eating right before or after practice or a game? Thank you for all of the advice. You pretty much outlined what I’ve been doing with our diet since reading your blog. It’s good to know we’re on the right track. I’m still searching for an optimal yogurt substitute, I’m not sure if they make a vegan Greek style . Right now I’m eating silk plain. I would like to thank you for your blog in general. Since we switched our diets over I feel 100 better. My daughter comes home from her vacation with the grandparents this weekend (she was gone for a month). We’ll hope she doesn’t go into shock with all of the middle isles taken away. haha. Thanks again.

    Mel Practice wrote on August 15th, 2007
  5. I have recently gone to a more vegan friendly diet. I am eating much less red meats and more seafood and greens. I truly feel much more lucid. Great read btw!

    terry wrote on August 15th, 2007
  6. This information-packed post has been highly beneficial. After reading your response, Danielle and I realized that we’re doing a pretty good job of adjusting our eating habits thus far.

    I think we’ll try to develop a rotating menu of 8-10 meals, as you suggested, so that we can keep some variety, but also don’t have to seeminly reinvent the wheel every time we prepare something to eat.

    I’m not sure of the potency, effectiveness or quality of my current multi-vitamin. I bought it at Vitamin World. It was one sale as a two-for-one, so I bought it. I know that there are certain vitamins that are specifically made for vegans, but I also understand that they sometimes use analogues to certain B vitamins, like B-12, which are similar to the animal-derived versions, but are not, in fact, absorbed or used in the same manner. I’m uncertain of the veracity of that claim, but I have read such things.

    As for protein supplementation, I worry about that as well. I’m fine with eating smaller portions of high-protein vegetables during the day and eating nuts and whatnot here and there, but I’m still uncertain how much protein I take in on a daily basis. I think my goal for this week will be to determine that. I’m reluctant to consume powdered soy protein, as I already eat a good bit of soy. I hear pea protein is a good option for vegans. Any thoughts on that?

    In terms of exercise, I’m trying to get back on that track. I’m currently doing physical therapy on my right leg because I have a papliteal cyst behind my knee. This is my second round of physical therapy, and I’m hoping this restores my musculature, as my quad and hamstrings have atrophied slightly due to my lack of using them as much. The doctor said that the next step is a steroid injection to break up the cyst, if the PT doesn’t work.

    Thanks again, Mark.

    Mike Drew wrote on August 17th, 2007
  7. There are some awesome vegetarian and vegan cookbooks out there. One of the best (IMO) is The Cook Book For People Who Love Animals (love them frolicking and being not confined, tortured, and murdered) http://yhst-48641225173758.stores.yahoo.net/coforpewholo.html
    Full of all sorts of handy recipes from easy to complex a great way to live cruelty free and healthy!

    Timothy wrote on August 18th, 2007
  8. hi i enjoyed the read

    Ingrid wrote on August 18th, 2007
  9. I am a former vegan who returned to an omnivore diet for many of the reasons cited in your post. I do wish to challenge two points:

    “If being vegan means simply avoiding all animal products, then it’s a slam dunk to find an almost infinite variety among the center aisles of your grocery store.”

    There are hidden animal-based ingredients like casein, albumen, and glycerides in many seemingly vegan-friendly refined food products. That is why vegan groups put out shopping lists of products and ingredients to avoid.

    “One of my biggest concerns for my son the vegetarian is that he is getting enough protein to fuel his growing athletic body. Luckily, he has agreed to supplement his diet with a protein powder that my company makes, and he is otherwise very diligent about consuming nuts and legumes with his vegetable meals to provide as wide an array of amino acids as possible.”

    I’m surprised that a nutritionally savvy person would believe the myth of veganism = protein deficiency. The WHO recommends a diet of 10-15% protein, and rapidly growing infants are nourished by mother’s milk that is only 7% protein. Small servings of fresh nuts and seeds are highly correlated with disease prevention and longevity, and it’s a shame that most Americans eat only peanuts roasted in vegetable oil and peanut butter flavored with corn syrup and homogenized with partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.

    Sonagi wrote on August 18th, 2007
  10. “Soy-based foods such as tempeh, while fermented or otherwise processed to render the protein more digestible – and therefore probably as good a protein source as a vegan can find – can still cause gastric distress in some people and mild allergic reactions in some others. Furthermore, the jury is still out on the health benefits of soy, particularly among those whose intake is unusually high in an effort to consume more protein (say, exceeding 30 grams soy protein a day). “

    “In some people” is the key phrase here. Humans across the globe have adapted to vastly different diets. Some people have difficulty digesting or are allergic to legumes, but many people like myself can eat them easily with no problems. The problem of allergies is often mentioned by paleos who denounce grains and beans, but look at the list of top allergenic foods:

    tree nuts, peanuts, cow’s milk, eggs, soy, fish and shellfish

    Half are animal protein foods, and fish has been a part of the human diet from earliest times. It is, in fact, the addition of fish to the diet that enabled the evolution of the human brain. Yet fish still provokes allergies in some people.

    Grains and beans aren’t net negative just because they are relatively recent additions to the human diet and because of so-called antinutrients and the potential for allergies. I read recently about research correlating consumption of whole grains with reduced rates of certain cancers. It is thought that those naughty mineral-robbing phytates might bind with carcinogic toxins and carry them out of the body.

    Sonagi wrote on August 18th, 2007
  11. And I forgot to add that only 8% of children and 2% of adults have at least one food allergy. Food allergies can be serious for those who have them, but most of us have immune systems that do not overreact to the great variety of animal or vegetable proteins in our diets.

    Sonagi wrote on August 18th, 2007
  12. A good example of a person surviving on a vegetarion diet is Dr. Lorraine Day. She cured herself of a pretty severe cancer by juicing and avoiding meats, but also 9 other areas of lifestyle change. She looks about 25 years younger than her age, now in the late sixties. Check out her website at drday.com.

    Sherman wrote on August 22nd, 2007
    • Dr Joel Furhman has a wonderful book “Eat to Live” that addresses the protein issue for vegans/vegetarians very well. He lists many vegetables that have just as much protein as animal sources.

      Darcie wrote on May 23rd, 2012
  13. This cartoon made me laugh out loud as my allergic ds (dairy, soy, egg white, wheat, malt) asked me the other day “Mom, where does rice milk come from?” Thanks for the chuckle!

    Nancy S wrote on August 22nd, 2007
  14. My main comment re veget. diet and colon cancer follows Mark’s article, “Escape form Vegan Island”. But, here I want to say that eating in our house is never boring with our veg. diet. There are too many veggies to include in salads, a stir fry or (when it’s cold) soups for it ever to be the same. I never cook or “salad” the same combo. It’s in the engineering background to be creative at all times.

    Tom Orlando wrote on August 25th, 2007
  15. there is disagreement about fish being the bigger brain spark – some feel it was tubers, which created more fuel for more work

    potatoes btw completely blow away all other foods on the satiety index

    tee wrote on August 25th, 2007
  16. I think the main problem in the diet is wheat – it causes fatigue which creates desire for sugar, caffeine and more wheat

    white rice does not do this – nor do potatoes

    though I agree we need to keep caloric consumption down – something relatively easy in a diet without wheat

    btw, there is some deabate about fish being the spark of bigger brains – some feel it was tubers – which gave more energy for more work

    tee wrote on August 25th, 2007
  17. Several good cookbooks by Robin Robertson address vegetarian cooking with a lot of variety of ingredients and flavors. Two of my favorite as a former meat-lover are “Vegetarian Meat and Potatoes” and “Vegetarian Chili”. Both have dozens of variations of these typical meals. “Some Like it Hot” is chock full of dishes spiced from around the world. I also see online that she has a vegan book with international recipes and a new one due in November called “One Dish Vegetarian Meals” Finally, she also has a “Carb-Conscious” cookbook that I have yet to open up to get beyond the typically grain-based alternatives.

    Brian wrote on August 29th, 2007
  18. I also think the protein concern is bunk. I fell for it at first, and was making sure I was eating plenty of beans, nuts, and soy-based foods. But after I stopped paying attention to how much protein I was consuming, I began to add a lot of weight and repetitions to my strength workouts and my waist melted away while I added noticable bulk in my upper body. I no longer believe one has to “try” to eat a lot of protein on a vegetarian diet to add muscle mass.

    Brian wrote on August 29th, 2007
  19. Great post! I’ll probably blog something similar later.

    Premium wrote on October 28th, 2007
  20. Y’know, even though I’m an omnivore, and never will choose to be vegan, here’s a list of vegetables that I absolutely love. I find that most western groceries don’t have a large variety of veg (you’re missing out!), which in turn makes for dull veg recipes (other than Indian). Anyway, on with the list. You can sometimes find these in farmers’ markets or chinese groceries.

    Garlic shoots – these are best stir-fried very quickly to maintain their crisp texture. They have a slightly garlicky sweetness to them

    Swamp Spinach – the leaves are great in soups, especially a sour philippine soup, or very quickly stir-fried with garlic and a dash of soy sauce. If you want extra fiber, add the stalks as well.

    Chinese broccoli- as opposed to regular broccoli, this is a leafy vegetable with a slight bitter taste. Treat as swamp spinach.

    Bok Choi – what is called Napa cabbage. Great as a stir-fry, even better as kimchi (and no, kimchi will not stink if you use salt instead of the traditional fermented fish paste)

    Squash flowers – perfect stuffed, or in soups. You can deep fry them, but that’s not exactly healthy.

    Anyhoo, just a partial list.

    JYC wrote on March 14th, 2010
  21. I have been a vegetarian for several years, and I must say that I am quite impressed… Not only with your post, but with the kindness, maturity, and curiosity of the other posters! I have never found a site where meat eaters and veg*ns can work together in collaboration (and in peace) for better health! It is nice to finally find a respectful and welcoming community!!!

    cisco wrote on June 14th, 2010
    • I’m 2 years late but I was thinking the same thing :-) I really love the acceptance that seems to be Mark’s M.O.! There’s no need to get religious about nutrition and insist there is one “right” way and everyone else is going to (be un)hell(thy). :-)

      Jackie wrote on April 8th, 2012
  22. Interesting! Might have to save this for the day when all the meat is gone:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/28/vegetarian-water-food-shortage_n_1836273.html

    Craig wrote on September 7th, 2012
  23. There is no such thing as an obligatorily vegan Hindu. We don’t revere cows because we think they’re godly. It is because of the nourishment they give in the form of milk! That is why, killing a cow is forbidden by Hinduism. About the only thing that Hinduism prohibits explicitly and unanimously. A cow is called “Gomata” or Mother Cow, at times, and killing a cow is considered tantamount to killing the human who first gives milk to the child – the mother. Please don’t equate Hinduism with veganism or soy. I never heard of veganism before moving to this continent. Nor did I ever eat soy in India. Yes, I was raised an ovo lacto vegetarian.

    sangeetha wrote on January 14th, 2013
    • “Most evolutionary biologists will tell you that there has never been a culture that existed entirely without animal products of any kind, although apparently some Hindu sects claim to have done so.”

      “some Hindu sects”

      Where did anyone mention obligatory vegan Hindus? Where did anyone equate Hinduism with veganism and soy?

      I think it’s quite easy to infer that he probably means Jains. The only ignorance here is calling them Hindus.

      Ashlee wrote on May 8th, 2014
  24. Ok, my post above sounds like I am offended by classing me with vegans, which isn’t the case. I was typing on a touch screen and editing is very annoying on it. As is avoiding certain buttons like enter :-). I am just amazed by how little people know of Hindus and yet make statements about it. I know that you say that you don’t believe that Hindus were ever vegan but who ARE these Hindus who call themselves vegan traditionally? Recently, I read an Indian’s post about her child’s milk consumption. And said that she’s vegan! I think that poor understanding of the term vegan by vegetarians is the source of this confusion. Of course, I do use the word vegan when I go to some restaurants because when I tell them that I am a vegetarian, they immediately ask if I would like some salmon. It is easier to strip everything down and then say that I can eat cheese.

    SAngeetha wrote on January 14th, 2013
  25. What is funnier is when Sally Fallon discusses the health and lifespans of Indians and how South Indians have a lifespan of about 30 years and are frail and sickly. There is nothing frail or sickly about me nor in most of my family, believe you me! My current health problems, I squarely attribute to my restricted diet for several months while nursing my daughter as she couldn’t tolerate many foods. That, and my bad posture.

    SAngeetha wrote on January 14th, 2013
  26. Wow, an entire blog post based entirely on fallacies and assumptions based on personal anecdotes. I have been a vegetarian for all of my eighteen years alive and a vegan for the past five years. I used to subside on a vegetarian diet consisting mainly of grain, tofu, vegetables, and milk fats. I was borderline obese. I have since dropped all animal products from my diet and I now have 8% body fat. I exercise very little aside from walking a few miles per week. I enjoy the food that I eat and do not starve myself. I eat mostly apples, nuts, cauliflower, mushrooms, and sweet potatoes. I have never had a nutritional deficiency and only started to take a vitamin supplement around five months ago, merely out of culturally-induced paranoia. My diet is high in fat from nuts, high in protein, and low in carbohydrates. You have some good points but you are wrong about the benefits of animal fat and protein and you are dead wrong about veganism. I haven’t had a moment’s regret in all five of my years of a herbivorous diet. Nobody claims that merely cutting out animal products will make you healthy and live to be one hundred and twenty years old. You have to eat a balanced diet… As is the case with any diet. It is childish and elitist to claim that your “paleo” diet is superior to my dietary choice, as you have no scientific evidence to support your point…

    Leroy wrote on December 5th, 2013

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