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February 18, 2017

Turkish Salad

By Worker Bee
8 Comments

PrimalIn this refreshing salad, herbs are treated as a main ingredient, not a garnish. Fill your salad bowl with parsley, mint and dill (thyme and oregano are also good), either finely chopped or roughly snipped with scissors. The bright and fragrant herbs obviously add color and potent aroma, but there’s more hidden in their leaves… namely antioxidants, plus many other health benefits.

Don’t get bogged down by memorizing which herbs offer what benefits. Just make a point of regularly enjoying salads like this one that feed your body a variety of fresh herbs. Every recipe for Turkish shepherd’s salad has a slightly different combination of ingredients, but they all strive for refreshing, lively flavor. This Turkish salad combines loads of fresh herbs, tomatoes, bell pepper, cucumber, and red onion with creamy feta and a tangy dressing made from olive oil and pomegranate molasses.

Because it’s loaded with fresh herbs, tomatoes and cucumbers, Turkish shepherd’s salad is often thought of as a summer salad. But go ahead and make it year round. Not only because it’s packed with antioxidants, but also because it’s the perfect cure for a case of the winter’s blues, when you need a taste of summer.

Servings: 4 to 6

Time in the Kitchen: 25 minutes

Ingredients

primal

  • 16 ounces cherry tomatoes, halved (450 g)
  • 1 bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 2 small or 1 large cucumber, chopped
  • ½ small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup chopped or snipped parsley leaves (240 ml)
  • ¼ cup chopped or snipped mint leaves (60 ml)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped dill (15 ml)
  • 1 tablespoon pomegranate molasses (15 ml)
  • ½ teaspoon lemon juice (2.5 ml)
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil (60 ml)
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt (1.2 ml)
  • 3 grinds black pepper
  • ½ cup crumbled feta (2 ounces/56 g)

Instructions

Primal

In a large bowl, gently combine tomatoes, bell pepper, cucumber, red onion, parsley, mint and dill.

In a small bowl, whisk together pomegranate molasses, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil and salt.

Pour the dressing on top of the salad and gently toss. Top the salad with feta.

Primal

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8 Comments on "Turkish Salad"

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Shary
Shary
7 months 5 days ago

This looks delish. I’ve never tried pomegranate molasses, but I do use lemon juice and EVOO on salads. Vinegar, which is high in histamines, gives me hives and makes my skin itch. It took me a long time to pin it down since the problem doesn’t show up immediately, but I find I do much better if I avoid foods that are high in histamines.

Colleen Madden
7 months 5 days ago

That looks so good-fresh & bright! I think it would be great spooned over grilled chicken, fish or steak

barry
barry
7 months 5 days ago

+1, I’d love to throw some grilled chicken or grass fed fajita steak over it. A salad never fills me up unless I have some animal protein with it.

Elizabeth Resnick
7 months 5 days ago

This sounds amazing! Love using fresh herbs, and they are loaded with antioxidants. Sometimes I throw a big handful of parsley or cilantro in my green drink in the am.

Amy Stainthorpe
7 months 2 days ago

Such a vibrant looking dish! It’s still a little cold to embrace salad here in the UK but I’m bookmarking this for warmer weather lunches! Thanks

Jeanne
Jeanne
7 months 2 days ago

I suggest eating this delicious salad with lamb, which would be really authentic. Lamb is everywhere in Turkey.

AnnaBecker
7 months 2 days ago

Pomegranate molasses sounds very interesting. I’ve never even heard of it. Where can I find it?

ian
ian
6 months 28 days ago

I do something similar, cucumber, onion, avocado, with olive oil, you can kick it up a notch with some dried sausage and fresh mozzarella,

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