Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

Tell Me More
Stay Connected

Tag: weekend link love

Weekend Link Love – Edition 463

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

Reducing sugar intake may be the key to reducing health care costs.

In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s, capsaicin (spicy component of hot peppers) improves cognitive function and reduces synapse loss.

Neanderthal genetic introgression may have shaped the modern human brain.

There’s a big link between substance abuse and sleep loss in adolescents.

Lutein, found in spinach, eggs, kale, and avocado (among others), may counter aging’s effect on the brain.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 462

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

The sperm count in men from North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand has declined by 50% over the last 40 years.

Sperm quality is down in dogs, too.

Birthday wishes do come true, as long as you wish to increase the cake’s bacterial levels by 1500%.

Another study shows that wearing blue blocking goggles at night boosts melatonin levels, even when you use your smartphone.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 461

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

A father’s absence triggers cellular stress in children.

Big new trans-ethnic Alzheimer’s study finds several new genetic variants associated with the disease.

Ketamine saves suicidal teens.

Lung cancer patients undergoing successful treatment experience spontaneous re-pigmentation of gray hair.

Dogs split from a now-extinct group of wolves about 40,000 years ago.

A black tea polyphenol (called mitochondria activation factor) enhances hypertrophy in rodents.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 460

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

Preformed vitamin D, the kind found in eggs, fish, and meat, is about 5 times as bioactive as vitamin D3. This makes animal foods a rich source of vitamin D and may explain why human skin lightened after the adoption of agriculture—so they could replace the vitamin D they no longer got from hunted meat.

Deficiencies of carnitine (a nutrient found in meat) may explain some autism cases.

Some people may be overdoing vitamin D supplementation.

Given a prompt, airport visitors are more likely to walk than ride the people-mover.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 459

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

A fourth Denisovan appears.

Regular meditation helps athletes endure interval training.

“Edible” oils may partially explain the South Asian diabetes epidemic.

When autophagy slows, cellular aging accelerates.

Taking 5 kilograms of broccoli crammed into a single pill is great for a diabetic’s blood sugar numbers.

Our relationship to the Neanderthals just got even more complicated.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 458

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

More research shows that chocolate is good for cognition.

A skull cult at Gobekli Tepe. Why can’t I join a skull cult?

Now this is a depression treatment I love: bouldering.

Identical workouts have different effects on mood depending on whether you’re indoors or outdoors. I’ll let you guess which setting gives the best results.

Scientists just ran seven different replication studies of the original power pose research. All of them failed to replicate.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 457

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

Seasonality may have driven the development of agriculture.

Even seated upper body activity suffices to break up sedentary time.

Old Japanese women who eat the most protein and high-antioxidant foods are the least frail.

Low-carb diets work well at getting type 2 diabetics off their meds, even left to their own devices with only occasional assistance from remote clinicians.

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 457

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

High cholesterol, lower Parkinson’s risk.

Cities are evolutionary hotspots.

19-year-olds are as sedentary as 60-year-olds.

Bariatric surgery creates an entirely new microbiome.

Many surgeries rely on the placebo effect.

Fried potato consumption raises mortality risk. Is it the potatoes, the frying, or the oil?

Read More

Weekend Link Love – Edition 456

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK

Moderate drinking emerges as a risk factor for cognitive decline.

We’re not even close to understanding the biological control of appetite.

If you’re going to take milk protein after lifting, 9 grams is the absolute minimum (and more is better).

New drugs are being fast-tracked without adequate testing.

Read More

Join Over 300,000 Subscribers!

Signup and get:

Primal Blueprint Fitness plus 7 other eBooks
7-Day Course on Primal Fundamentals
Special Offers and More!