Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Posts Tagged ‘ lunch ’

29 Mar

Slow-Cooked Chicken Adobo with Coconut Aminos

ChickenAdoboIn this Primal version of Filipino chicken adobo adapted for a slow cooker, coconut aminos take the place of soy sauce. The result is a wheat-free, soy free meal that still has the authentic sweet, salty and slightly tart flavor that makes chicken adobo so good.

While coconut aminos don’t taste exactly like soy sauce, the differences in flavor are harder to detect the longer coconut aminos are cooked. Braising or simmering meat in a sauce laced with coconut aminos adds umami flavor to the dish. The coconut aminos also add a hint of natural sweetness. By the end of the cooking process, the sweet, salty and umami flavors are in perfect balance.

15 Feb

Celeriac Noodles with Parsley Pesto

CeleriacNoodles1There are several types of vegetables that can be used to mimic noodles (spaghetti squash, zucchini) but none do it as well as celeriac. Peeled strands of this rugged root will cook to al dente in less than 3 minutes, making a fine bowl of faux fettuccine.

Celeriac noodles can be topped with any of your favorite sauces, but are especially good with this parsley pesto that matches the clean, fresh flavor of the noodles. Celeriac (also called celery root) has an herbal, pleasantly bitter flavor that will remind you of both celery and parsley. The flavor is stronger when raw and quite mild when cooked.

26 Nov

A Primal Thanksgiving Menu (plus a Contest)

thanksgivingturkeyIt’s two days away from Thanksgiving here in the United States, and that means a significant portion of my readership is scrambling to put together a Primal menu. Things are easier now with the rise of the ancestral health community and the growing preponderance of related recipe blogs, but a lot of you are still wasting precious time combing through their volumes or converting standard Thanksgiving recipes into Primal-friendly recipes. You have better things to do. You have family and friends to visit, footballs to toss (or kick, as the case may be), piles of polychromatic leaves to roll around in, and thanks to give. Even if you’re an international reader, don’t celebrate Thanksgiving or know quite what it’s all about, you still like to eat great food.

9 Nov

Cuban Picadillo

Picadillo1Cuban Picadillo is basically a sloppy joe without the bun. But picadillo has a little more pizzazz, thanks to the sweet and piquant flavor combination of raisins and olives simmered with ground beef and tomato sauce. Picadillo is home cooked comfort food, the type of easy weeknight meal that both kids and adults love.

Like Filipino Kaldereta, the ingredients in Cuban Picadillo are a reflection of its history. Peppers, tomatoes and olives can be traced back to Spanish colonization. The blending of sweet and acidic ingredients is also a big part of Caribbean cuisine. Traditionally served over rice and beans (and sometimes, plantains) Primal Picadillo can be served over cauliflower rice or simply heaped in a bowl with nothing else. It’s also pretty great next to eggs for breakfast.

2 Nov

Filipino Beef Kaldereta

KalderetaKaldereta is a Filipino stew with flavors influenced by three centuries of Spanish colonization in the Philippines. Tomato-based and traditionally made with goat or beef, potatoes, green olives and peppers, it’s a filling, comforting dish.

The really ingenious ingredient in Kaldereta is puréed chicken liver.

Stirred in at the end, chicken livers give the stew a thick, creamy texture and super-meaty flavor. This technique can be used with any of your favorite stew, chili or curry recipes. There are more sneaky ways to work offal into your meals, but this is arguably one the easiest and tastiest methods.

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