Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

Tell Me More
Stay Connected

Category: Recipes

Slow-Simmered Cabbage Soup

Cabbage is rarely described as tasting rich, but when simmered long and slow with plenty of butter and olive oil, that’s exactly the outcome. Although buttery, slow-simmered cabbage can be a dish in itself, add broth and sausage and you’ll get a very simple soup with incredibly rich, comforting flavor.

When cooking cabbage this way, high-quality butter and olive oil make a difference in flavor and healthfulness. Use grass-fed butter, if possible. Buy olive oil that’s as local as possible, has real flavor and has been put through the “fridge test.

Read More

Braised Turkey Legs with Fennel and Artichoke Hearts

When whole turkeys start showing up in grocery stores, so do turkey drumsticks. These are not dainty drumsticks. They are caveman style eating, drumsticks that weigh in around a full pound each. Roasted and carved, and served with sides, one drumstick can make a meal for two people. If you’re someone who loves dark turkey meat, or if turkey one day a year just isn’t enough, then braised turkey drumsticks are a meal you’ll love.

Turkey drumsticks can be cooked alongside a whole turkey, for more dark meat, or cooked in place of a whole turkey. (If you can find turkey thighs, they can be cooked using this same method.) The drumsticks braise uncovered (so the skin isn’t soggy) and there’s little risk of the meat drying out, like turkey breast often does.

All in all, you’re getting the best, most flavorful part of the bird for less money with less cooking stress involved. Sounds the perfect holiday meal, doesn’t it?

Read More

Waffle Iron Sweet Potato Hash Browns

Sweet potatoes have a lot going for them as a breakfast potato of choice. Shredded into hash browns, they make a bigger flavor statement than regular old potato hash browns, and the sweetness is a perfect contrast with salty bacon and eggs.

Sweet potatoes are also strong sources of beta-carotene, manganese, and copper and safe sources of starch.

Sure, sweet potato hash browns can be cooked in a skillet. But if you have a waffle iron in the back of the cupboard that’s not being used for waffles any more, then pull it out. A waffle iron quickly and easily turns shredded sweet potatoes (and regular potatoes) into hash browns. The strings of sweet potato are both tender and crispy, with sweet, buttery flavor. Pile them high on plate and they’ll fly off the breakfast table (and the dinner table, too).

Read More

Winter Squash, Leek and Chard Frittata

A frittata is the perfect meal any time of day, cold or hot, eaten with a knife and fork or with your hands. It’s the type of dish a person is tempted to use as a receptacle for leftovers, throwing in bits of meat and cooked vegetables, wilted herbs and an old knob of cheese. It’s hard to go wrong with a frittata, but if you want to go really, really right, this is the recipe.

The sweet and earthy flavors of winter squash, leeks and Swiss chard swirl together here in a frittata with a creamy, custard-like texture. The secret to the heavenly texture is full-fat dairy; without it, frittatas often have the texture of a kitchen sponge. Dairy isn’t for everyone, but if you tolerate dairy well, then there’s no reason to abstain. Full-fat dairy has more than just rich, delicious flavor to offer.

In this frittata recipe, crème fraiche adds amazing flavor and texture, although the same amount of yogurt, cream, or grated cheese can be substituted. And if this frittata has too many veggies for you and not enough meat, then go ahead and add some prosciutto or cooked bacon. You won’t be sorry.

Read More

Quick & Easy Salmon Cakes

This is a guest post from Diane Sanfilippo, author of Practical Paleo and the wildly popular blog, BalancedBites.com.

Diane often leaves a lot of space to make her recipes your own, and this one is no exception. This recipe can easily be modified to switch up flavors, or for those following a low FODMAP diet.

If you’re looking to dress-up the wild canned salmon you’ve been buying, this is the recipe for you! It’s quick and easy, and it can be made mostly from the ingredients you tend to have on-hand.

Bonus recipe: Use Primal Kitchen™ Mayo to make an amazing dipping sauce/topping for these salmon cakes using the recipe at the bottom of the page.

Read More

Beef Tamale Pie

Tamale pie is simple fare, an unfussy but delicious casserole topped with a cornbread crust. The crust is an essential part of tamale pie. Without it, you’ve just got a skillet of ground beef and bell peppers. But cornbread just isn’t a tempting topping (especially when made from a box of Jiffy cornbread). So what’s a tamale pie lovin’ person to do?

A quick flip through Primal Cravings, a book filled with innovative, Primal-approved recipes, brings inspiration. A riff on the Primal Cravings biscuit recipe, this tamale pie topping is everything you want it to be. It has a soft, crumbly texture that soaks up the meaty flavor below. It has a slight sweetness like cornbread does, but doesn’t scream out “coconut!” like some coconut flour recipes do.

A spoonful of the warm, savory bread-like topping with the seasoned ground beef below will definitely satisfy your tamale pie cravings. It’s a classic, comforting casserole, the Primal way.

Read More

Join Over 300,000 Subscribers!

Signup and get:

Primal Blueprint Fitness plus 7 other eBooks
7-Day Course on Primal Fundamentals
Special Offers and More!