Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Recipes

Oyster Po’ Boy Salad

An oyster po’ boy is a classic New Orleans sandwich made of oysters breaded in cornmeal and fried until crisp. Set on a white roll, slathered in mayo and topped with iceberg lettuce and tomatoes, it isn’t exactly health food. But if you ditch the white bread and cornmeal, the oyster po’ boy can be reincarnated as a salad that’s really good in its own right.

Fried oysters, it turns out, are a delicious salad topper. In this Primal version of an oyster po’ boy, the oysters are breaded in tapioca flour. Crunchy on the outside and juicy in the middle, they’re perfect tossed with cool iceberg lettuce, fresh tomatoes and a creamy, tangy dressing.

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Lasagna Meatloaf

Lasagna meatloaf has all the delicious flavor of lasagna, without the noodles. Cheese is optional, and although it adds creamy mozzarella flavor, the meatloaf is more than satisfying without it. Marinara sauce, basil and oregano, onion and garlic…this all-beef meatloaf has it all. Plus three ingredients that hold the loaf together perfectly: eggs, finely chopped mushrooms, and gelatin.

Eggs are always used to bind meatloaf. This recipe only uses two. Raw mushrooms, very finely chopped (use a food processor) look a lot like breadcrumbs and in this loaf, have a similar job. They help the meat bind together, while also adding flavor and moisture. Powdered gelatin is the final binding agent, helping to give the meatloaf a sliceable texture. This trio—eggs, mushrooms, and gelatin—can be used with any meatloaf recipe.

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Dulse “Bacon” and Eggs

Dulse, a type of red seaweed with high amounts of magnesium and calcium, has gotten some attention for tasting like bacon from the sea. Is it just media hype, or is it possible that dulse (pronounced duhls) really does taste like meaty, salty, fatty bacon?

Dried, whole leaf dulse can be eaten right out of the bag. It’s a bit chewy, tastes very salty, a little smoky and has that fresh-from-the-ocean seaweed flavor. When dulse is heated in a skillet with a little oil, it changes. The texture gets crispy, the seaweed flavor fades and the smokiness get stronger. It does indeed have some bacon-like qualities.

Even so, if you expect the dulse to taste exactly like bacon you’ll be disappointed. There is nothing like bacon…except bacon. But if you taste pan-fried dulse with a forkful of scrambled eggs and an open mind, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how well the smoky, salty flavor pairs with eggs. It’s not exactly like traditional eggs and bacon, but it’s a breakfast that’s good in its own right.

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Roasted Bone-In Leg of Lamb

A bone-in leg of lamb is a cut of meat that’s the perfect choice for a formal holiday table or a casual backyard dinner. Slather a marinade on the outside, roast the leg slowly for a few hours then crank up the heat to crisp up the outside. It doesn’t matter what you serve on the side, because the leg of lamb will get all the attention.

Of course there are health benefits that make lamb a good choice—all 8 essential amino acids, B vitamins, niacin, zinc, iron and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to name a few – but that’s not what most people are thinking when they look at a bone-in leg of lamb. What they’re thinking is, “Now that is an impressive cut of meat!”

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Chicken Skin Chips

Chips made from root vegetables or kale are all well and good, but once you’ve tried chicken skin chips they’ll be the only chip you crave. Like regular potato chips, the salty, oily flavor is truly addictive and the light, crispy texture shatters like glass when you take a bite. The only problem with these chips is that they require self-control. Although, if you’re going to eat one too many chips, then they might as well be made from chicken skin.

Animal skin is high in fat, collagen and gelatin. All three are good for joints, nails, hair, and skin. Of course, the healthier the chicken, the healthier the skin will be (pastured, organic, and antibiotic free are labels to looks for).

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Primal Salmon Spread with Nori Chips

This salmon spread, made from both poached and smoked salmon mashed with butter, is a version of French rillettes. Rillettes, which are similar to pâté, are made from blending together protein and fat. Could there be a better snack?

Rillettes are often made with pork, duck or rabbit meat and lard, but using salmon and butter is easier and a genius way to make creamy salmon spread without adding mayonnaise, cream cheese or sour cream. The blend of salmon and butter (with just a drizzle of olive oil) is flavored with chives, capers and lemon.

There’s really no reason not to treat this “spread” like a salad and eat it with a fork, but if you want finger food then serve salmon rillettes on crispy nori chips.

This salmon rillettes recipe is adapted from the book “Cooking at Home on Rue Tatin.”

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