Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Category: Recipes

Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes with Chives

Now here’s a vegetable that doesn’t have it easy. The Jerusalem artichoke is neither an artichoke nor is it from Jerusalem. It’s no beauty either; the knobby, brown exterior doesn’t exactly whet the appetite. Perhaps worst of all, however, is its reputation for causing a bit of, well, there’s really no delicate way to say this… gas.

So why do Jerusalem Artichokes have a devoted foodie fan base? A unique but delicate flavor, for starters. Secondly, it’s a vegetable that’s really easy to cook in a variety of ways. Last but definitely not least, we appreciate this low-starch tuber for its prebiotic fiber and think that in moderation it can add healthy variety to your diet.

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How to Make Red Wine Vinegar

Tart, sour, acidic, harsh: four words that don’t exactly make our mouth water. Unfortunately, they’re often words that come to mind when tasting moderately-priced red wine vinegar that we’ve bought at the store. Even more disappointing is that immoderately-priced bottles aren’t often much better. This isn’t the case with balsamic vinegar – we’re willing to splurge now and then on a bottle of good balsamic imported from Italy because we know we can’t replicate the smooth, syrupy results at home. But red wine vinegar is a different story. By taking matters into your own hands, you can make red wine vinegar that is often much better than what you can buy. Better yet, the whole process is much easier than you might think.

It does, however, require patience. About two months from start to finish. In fact, we’re currently waiting for a batch to reach maturity and find ourselves eagerly ticking off the days until we can whisk it into vinaigrette. This sort of giddy anticipation is a big part of why we love making our own food at home. If all goes well with the vinegar currently sitting in a crock in our cupboard, we’re expecting the flavor to be a bit fruity and earthy; mellow and not overpowered by sharp acidity.

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Mexican Mole Sauce

This particular recipe is a cross between red and black mole (pronounced MOLE-lay); the flavor and color influenced by a blend of dried chiles, nuts, seeds, dried fruit and chocolate. This is the type of mole people outside of Mexico tend to be most familiar with and unfortunately, many versions are overly sweet and heavy, especially store-bought versions. When made well, the sweetness in mole is balanced by the spicy, smoky flavor of chiles, and the toasted and slightly bitter flavor of roasted nuts and seeds.

There’s no denying that mole is a labor-intensive sauce, but we’ve done our best to make this version as straightforward as possible. Although it takes effort to gather and prepare the ingredients, the sense of accomplishment you’ll feel when it all comes together into an amazing Primal meal is worth it. Also, a little bit of mole goes a long way, so it’s likely you can make a batch and freeze half for another meal.

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Beef Stew and Chicken Soup in 35 Minutes or Less

Most of us are familiar with slow cookers and rely on them from time to time when we want a home cooked meal that requires very little effort. There are many reasons to love a slow cooker. Speed is not one of them.

A pressure cooker, on the other hand, can do just about everything a slow cooker can in a fraction of the time. The basic idea is the same: throw meat and vegetables in a pot, add seasonings and enough liquid to cover the ingredients, put on the lid and walk away. But instead of walking away for 4-8 hours, like you would with a slow cooker, a pressure cooker gives you just enough time to change out of your work clothes and sort through the junk mail before dinner is done. In about 30 minutes a whole chicken or several pounds of tough stew meat are transformed into a meal that will melt in your mouth, rich with flavor and perfectly cooked. In an hour, an entire pot roast will fall apart with tenderness.

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Caviar Served Three Ways (plus a Primal Blini Recipe)

Even if you’ve tried to keep your head buried in the sand and avoid the media headlines this year, the onslaught of bad economic news has been hard to ignore. Unemployment, defaulted mortgages, a tanking economy…it’s no wonder we’re looking forward to New Year’s Eve more than ever, a holiday that celebrates moving forward and starting fresh. It’s a holiday that encourages even the scrooges among us to be hopeful. It’s also a holiday that puts us in the mood to ignore the headlines and splurge a little bit, and few foods make us feel more extravagant than caviar.

I usually publish recipes here on Mark’s Daily Apple on Saturdays, but I thought you might like a little lead time so you can hunt down these delicious little fish eggs before the 31st. That and I’ve got something else planned for the 31st (stay tuned!). In any case, back to caviar.

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Spice Rubs for Your Holiday Roast

Whether you’re cooking prime rib, pot roast, top round or brisket, a roast is a great way to feed a holiday crowd. A roast makes for a substantial meal, pairs well with any of your favorite side dishes and offers the promise of leftovers the next day.

A roast can always be seasoned with salt and pepper, but for the holidays we like to spice things up a little. The spice aisle is full of pre-made spice blends, but you can easily personalize your holiday meal by simply opening up your spice drawer at home and mixing together a dry rub of your own.

Dry rubs can contain however many spices you want to add. They also usually contain salt, although you can leave this out and simply salt the meat to taste after it cooks. You can add equal amounts of each spice, or add more of a specific spice so its flavor dominates. How much rub to use on a piece of meat ultimately comes down to personal preference, but a good place to start is 1-2 tablespoons per pound of meat.

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